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NEWS
April 2, 2000
The chicken magnate of the Eastern Shore, Franklin P. Perdue, was seriously injured yesterday when his Mercedes rear-ended a pickup truck on Route 13 in Salisbury, Maryland State Police said. Police said they issued the 79-year-old a ticket charging him with negligent driving. Perdue was traveling south shortly after 9 a.m. when his car struck the truck whose driver was was making a right turn onto the Cheers gas station parking lot, said Maryland State Police Sgt. L. K. Guyton. The driver of the truck, James D. Simms, 47, sustained minor injuries and drove himself home after the accident, Guyton said.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
The Inn at Perry Cabin, a luxurious St. Michaels hotel where parts of the movie "Wedding Crashers" were filmed, will be sold to a private real estate firm for $39.7 million. The purchase by real estate magnate Richard Cohen's CAP Acquisitions LLC is expected to close in the next few weeks, according to real estate services firm Savills Hospitality Group, which advised on the deal. The seller, Orient-Express Hotels Ltd., will remain as manager under a 10-year agreement. Marc Magazine, executive managing director of Savills Hospitality, said his firm approached London-based Orient-Express at the end of last summer about selling the property because Cohen, the president of CAP Acquisitions, was interested in expanding his hotel holdings.
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NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Sergei L. Loiko and Jeffrey Fleishman and Sergei L. Loiko,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 6, 2007
MOSCOW -- New money-laundering and embezzlement charges filed yesterday against Russian oil magnate Mikhail Khodorkovsky make it unlikely that the prominent political enemy of President Vladimir V. Putin will be released from prison before Russia's 2008 presidential election. Khodorkovsky's conviction in 2005 for tax evasion and fraud, viewed by many analysts as retribution for his supporting political opposition figures, resulted in an eight-year prison sentence. Before the new accusations, the former billionaire chairman of Yukos Oil, who is being held in Siberia, could have been eligible for parole in October.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2012
Harbor Point, a development project led by bakery magnate and developer John Paterakis Sr., will be the site of the headquarters for the combined Constellation-Exelon company if the proposed merger is completed, the energy giants announced Wednesday. The prospect of adding a new office tower to Baltimore's skyline excited city officials and the development community. But some were disappointed that the companies chose a site between Harbor East and Fells Point, rather than in the central business district.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | November 11, 1993
Poultry magnate Frank Perdue has emerged as a potential player in Baltimore's effort to land an NFL expansion team.Perdue, the colorful executive who made his Salisbury-based Perdue Farms Inc. one of the nation's biggest privately held companies, has offered both Gov. William Donald Schaefer and prospective team owner Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass his assistance in landing an NFL team, according to sources familiar with the deliberations.His exact role is undefined, but sources say he has discussed becoming a member of Weinglass' investment group, which already includes moviemaker Barry Levinson, ex-Colt Joe Washington and a number of local businessmen, including Crown Central Petroleum chief Henry Rosenberg and H&S Bakery head John Paterakis.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1997
Michael Bloomberg finally emerged from six-and-a-half hours of board meetings into the sunshine outside Baltimore's Evergreen House, a neoclassical mansion once owned by a 19th century railroad magnate.Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg is a magnate himself, but of a uniquely 20th century industry -- information.He has built his Bloomberg News service into a billion-dollar force in only 15 years, challenging the venerable Dow Jones as the preferred provider of information to the financial world.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
SAN DIEGO - In this working-class neighborhood near San Diego's eastern border, the Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center is the face of the Salvation Army - one that seems a long way from the image of storefront missions and volunteers ringing bells to help the downtrodden. The entranceway, labeled "Doorway to Opportunity," is propped wide open on a recent evening - the better to accommodate a steady flow of tots and parents to the ice rink and teen-agers to the basketball court. Women in swim caps and men in goggles perform twilight laps at the outdoor pool, their arms breaking the surface in sync.
FEATURES
By Scott McCaffrey and Scott McCaffrey,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 4, 1996
A future Supreme Court chief justice raised his six children there. A future president called it a fire trap and moved out. A man known as Governor Moonbeam spent his college days there, but lived in a rented bachelor pad when his time came to lead the state.California's historic Governor's Mansion was the home of 13 Golden State chief executives from 1903 to 1967. Since then, it's been open to the public as a monument to the state's incredible growth and the men who oversaw its transition to America's most populous and diverse state.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 9, 1995
The papal visit was wonderful. We must do this again soon.They could always dispense with juries and let the people vote on big murder trials and public hangings.Turning economic development over to a nursing-home magnate was Hizzoner's clearest recognition yet of who still lives in Baltimore.All sides in Bosnia agreed to a 60-day trial cease-fire just to see if they would like it.5/8
NEWS
October 27, 1994
Mary G. Roebling, 89, the first American woman to serve as president of a major banking institution, died Tuesday of kidney failure in Trenton, N.J. Her second husband was banking and steel cable magnate Siegfried Roebling, whose company, Roebling Steel Corp., built the Brooklyn Bridge. After his death in 1937, she took over the Trenton Trust, serving as president or chairwoman until 1972 when Trenton Trust was merged into the National State Bank. She was then named to head the board of the combined institutions.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Construction magnate Willard Hackerman has offered to finance and build an 18,500-seat arena in downtown Baltimore, civic leaders say, freeing taxpayers from having to foot the bill and significantly increasing the chances that plans for a $900 million convention center expansion and arena will become a reality. News of Hackerman's offer was made public Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Greater Baltimore Committee, a private business group that has been exploring ways to build an arena that would be combined with an expanded convention center to bolster the city's tourism business and add life to Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
NEWS
February 26, 2009
Unfair for AFSCME to get additional fee AFSCME Maryland Director Patrick Moran was quoted in "Union seeks nonmember fees" (Feb. 18) as saying that AFSCME's efforts to seek a mandatory deduction of service fees from the paychecks of state employees is "about democracy, bottom line." What Mr. Moran, and the article addressing the legislation to allow a mandatory fee, fail to acknowledge is that when elections were held more than a dozen years ago, and AFSCME fought hard for the votes of state employees to become their collective bargaining representative, its representatives made no mention of such service fees.
BUSINESS
By Kim Christensen and E. Scott Reckard and Kim Christensen and E. Scott Reckard,Los Angeles Times | July 14, 2007
A former assistant to Broadcom Corp. co-founder Henry T. Nicholas III says in a lawsuit that the high-tech billionaire required him to oversee supplies of cocaine and other drugs, pay prostitutes from a $10,000 "petty cash" fund and conceal the "extracurricular activities" from his wife and others. In their own legal filings, Nicholas' attorneys accuse Kenji Kato of making the accusations as part of an attempt to extort $9 million from Nicholas. "These absurd allegations seem to be intended to disrupt the principal focus of my work, post-retirement, which would be in criminal justice and medical research," said Nicholas, who stepped down from Broadcom, a chip manufacturer, in January 2003.
BUSINESS
By Phil Rosenthal and Phil Rosenthal,Chicago Tribune | April 4, 2007
It must have been quite a sight in baggage claim at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. Crane Kenney, Tribune Co.'s general counsel and corporate secretary, was on his mobile phone getting yelled at by Chicago billionaire Sam Zell, who was calling from a jet cruising at 35,000 feet. Kenney had just arrived in Arizona, where he had gone 2 1/2 weeks ago to oversee the Cubs in spring training. He earlier had called the real estate magnate's right-hand man, Bill Pate, with what ostensibly should have been good news.
NEWS
February 6, 2007
NATIONAL Bush offers $2.9 trillion budget President Bush, seeking $245 billion more for the nation's two wars, proposed a $2.9 trillion federal budget for 2008 yesterday that would significantly increase defense spending while restraining other areas of the government. pg 1a Giuliani closer to bid Rudolph W. Giuliani, the former New York mayor whose popularity soared after his response to the Sept. 11 attacks, moved closer yesterday to a full-fledged campaign for the Republican presidential nomination.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Sergei L. Loiko and Jeffrey Fleishman and Sergei L. Loiko,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 6, 2007
MOSCOW -- New money-laundering and embezzlement charges filed yesterday against Russian oil magnate Mikhail Khodorkovsky make it unlikely that the prominent political enemy of President Vladimir V. Putin will be released from prison before Russia's 2008 presidential election. Khodorkovsky's conviction in 2005 for tax evasion and fraud, viewed by many analysts as retribution for his supporting political opposition figures, resulted in an eight-year prison sentence. Before the new accusations, the former billionaire chairman of Yukos Oil, who is being held in Siberia, could have been eligible for parole in October.
NEWS
July 1, 1993
Cable magnate Ted Turner didn't win any friends last week when he told a congressional subcommittee that television executives shoulder the blame for escalating homicide rates. But then the colorful cable magnate never has minced words. TV programmers "are guilty of murder as far as I can see," he said. "They all are. Me, too." He then suggested that if the TV industry did not adopt a voluntary ratings system, the Congress should "ram it down their throats."Chances are, plenty of Americans would agree with him. Congress is beginning to pay attention to the increasing numbers of people -- social science "experts" as well as common-sense parents -- who complain that gratuitous violence is having an effect on child behavior.
NEWS
February 6, 2007
NATIONAL Bush offers $2.9 trillion budget President Bush, seeking $245 billion more for the nation's two wars, proposed a $2.9 trillion federal budget for 2008 yesterday that would significantly increase defense spending while restraining other areas of the government. pg 1a Giuliani closer to bid Rudolph W. Giuliani, the former New York mayor whose popularity soared after his response to the Sept. 11 attacks, moved closer yesterday to a full-fledged campaign for the Republican presidential nomination.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE AND DOUG DONOVAN and JOHN FRITZE AND DOUG DONOVAN,SUN REPORTERS | April 19, 2006
GREAT MILLS -- Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley brought a bit of his big-city fight yesterday to one of the state's most politically provocative parklands in this tranquil town in Southern Maryland. Surrounded by shoulder-high pines in a protected forest that Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. tried to sell to a construction magnate two years ago, O'Malley promised that as governor he would preserve such land with development policies checked by state legislators. "In Baltimore City, we can't sell an abandoned house without [City Council]
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN and SLOANE BROWN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 16, 2005
Rodney Henry, 40, was lead guitarist for the popular bar band Glenmont Popes before becoming a "pie magnate." His Dangerously Delicious Pies, which opened in Canton two years ago, now sells his home-baked creations to several retail and restaurant businesses in the Baltimore-Washington area. We caught up with Henry at Peter's Inn in Fell's Point. How do you describe yourself? Free spirit. I rock! I want everything to be happy. I want to enjoy as much stuff as I possibly can. I like to have people feel pumped up. And if it's people you're working with, [when they're happy]
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