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NEWS
September 8, 2014
Kudos to Japan Rail and its promoters in the U.S. for their ingenuity and persistence in advancing the fortunes of magnetic levitation rail along the Northeast Corridor from Washington, D.C. to New York ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). As the project manager for past studies of Baltimore-Washington maglev feasibility for the federal and state transportation departments, I am convinced that 300 mile per hour rail service from Washington to Baltimore and ultimately on to New York will revolutionize travel along the Northeast and transform the recreational, business, tourist and commuter travel between Northeast cities.
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BUSINESS
Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
The circle of political power brokers and deep-pocketed investors hatched their plan more than three years ago, seeing promise in a project deemed wildly unrealistic by some and stubbornly unattainable by others. With billions in backing from the Japanese government, the Northeast Maglev group envisions building a futuristic magnetic levitation or "maglev" train capable of transporting Baltimore homeowners to Washington jobs in 15 minutes, at speeds above 300 mph. Plenty in Maryland think it will never happen or shouldn't, given the price tag in excess of $10 billion.
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NEWS
September 12, 2014
Everybody seems to think maglev is the answer, but what is the problem ( "Supertrain is cool, but improve what we have right now," Sept. 7)? If $10 billon were spent fixing the Baltimore & Potomac Tunnel and the Amtrak line between Baltimore and Washington, you could get similar results. The French high-speed TGV train's speed record is just one mile per hour slower than the Japanese maglev speed record - and the French engineer was told not to go faster although he indicated that he still had more power in reserve.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
John Harding, a maglev scientist from Palm Springs, Calif., blithely asserts that "the Amtrak station" (it's called Penn Station, Hon) should be moved downtown "for the sake of local commuters" ( "Maglev outperforms other trains," Sept. 16). It's a sure bet he has never conferred either with people who use Penn Station who are not all commuters or with those who would be affected either by its abandonment or by the disruption and expense associated with constructing a new one and the tracks leading to it. Good urban planning begins with respect for existing structures and communities.
NEWS
March 22, 2004
THE NOTION THAT soon there will be sleek, high-tech trains hurtling along at 300 miles per hour on a cushion of air, shuttling commuters between Baltimore and Washington, has long been a beguiling image. Magnetic levitation technology, or maglev, has also been accompanied by serious reservations. Is it feasible? Cost-effective? Safe? But those questions have never provided a reason to reject the maglev project. Rather, they are the reason why it must be studied further. Lawmakers need to find out as much as possible about its potential rewards and its risks.
NEWS
September 7, 2014
I read your article about the proposed maglev train with interest but was surprised that you did not write more about the one that is operational in Shanghai, China ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). It was built by Siemens and runs from downtown to the airport. I rode on it and they have a speed meter on it which gets to 400 kilometers per hour (or 260 miles per hour). It was very smooth and comfortable. One interesting thing our guide mentioned is that all of the drivers are women because the men would not go fast enough for the schedule.
NEWS
Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
A proposal to run a maglev train in the Northeast comes with a hefty price tag - approximately $10 billion just for the segment between Baltimore and Washington. Though the technology holds the promise of transporting passengers from one city to the next in 15 minutes, promoters will have to overcome the legacy of other promising projects that busted their budgets or turned out different than they looked on the drawing board. Big Dig By the early 1990s, traffic in Boston's Central Artery, an elevated six-lane highway that ran through the city's downtown, left traffic crawling for more than 10 hours a day. The Massachusetts Turnpike Authority started construction in 1991 to replace the Central Artery with an underground eight- to-10-lane expressway to combat the congestion.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
Republican delegates who oppose a proposed high-speed train connecting Baltimore and Washington are questioning the timing and the objectivity of a proposed task force to study the issue. The legislation creating that task force, which lawmakers are to discuss today, would set up a panel of state officials to evaluate the proposed 250-mph magnetic levitation, or maglev, train that Maryland has been trying to land since the early 1990s. The Federal Railroad Administration will decide next year whether Maryland or Pittsburgh will get the right to go ahead with the project, expected to cost $3.8 billion.
NEWS
April 5, 2003
Stephen Kiehl's article in the March 30 Sun asked, "Would anyone ride the maglev?" The answer is that there is a high probability some 30,000 to 33,000 riders a day would use the maglev in its initial year of operation of 2010. This estimate comes from a careful and painstaking study by Alex Metcalf, a national expert in travel projection who used survey and analytic procedures that have proved successful for many other highway and rail projects throughout the world. The maglev system is not intended for the average commuter who travels between Baltimore and Washington daily.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | November 14, 1991
The state Transportation Department will ask the General Assembly to allocate funds to study building a magnetic levitation, or maglev, rail line between Washington and Baltimore, a transportation official said yesterday.Robert Agee, deputy secretary of the transportation, said that the department "is not one of those standing back and saying it's too new, it's too difficult, it's too expensive."At the same time, he said at a conference held at the Stouffer Harborplace Hotel that "we have to deal with it in the context of the fiscal realities" that so far have left Maryland struggling to bridge a $600 million budget gap in fiscal 1992.
NEWS
September 15, 2014
In Robert Reuter's letter to the editor ( "Maglev is not the answer," Sept. 12), he identifies the great need to upgrade the Northeast Corridor's infrastructure. The proposal of an SCMAGLEV train system between Washington, D.C. and New York with an initial phase between Baltimore and Washington represents an opportunity to transform the mega-region. Undertaking this project, we will ensure that we can scale for future needs - both those we can foresee and those we cannot. With SCMAGLEV, we will choose a system technologically superior to conventional high-speed rail with extreme performance advantages.
NEWS
September 12, 2014
Everybody seems to think maglev is the answer, but what is the problem ( "Supertrain is cool, but improve what we have right now," Sept. 7)? If $10 billon were spent fixing the Baltimore & Potomac Tunnel and the Amtrak line between Baltimore and Washington, you could get similar results. The French high-speed TGV train's speed record is just one mile per hour slower than the Japanese maglev speed record - and the French engineer was told not to go faster although he indicated that he still had more power in reserve.
NEWS
September 8, 2014
Kudos to Japan Rail and its promoters in the U.S. for their ingenuity and persistence in advancing the fortunes of magnetic levitation rail along the Northeast Corridor from Washington, D.C. to New York ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). As the project manager for past studies of Baltimore-Washington maglev feasibility for the federal and state transportation departments, I am convinced that 300 mile per hour rail service from Washington to Baltimore and ultimately on to New York will revolutionize travel along the Northeast and transform the recreational, business, tourist and commuter travel between Northeast cities.
NEWS
September 7, 2014
I read your article about the proposed maglev train with interest but was surprised that you did not write more about the one that is operational in Shanghai, China ( "Billions lined up for 'maglev,'" Sept. 4). It was built by Siemens and runs from downtown to the airport. I rode on it and they have a speed meter on it which gets to 400 kilometers per hour (or 260 miles per hour). It was very smooth and comfortable. One interesting thing our guide mentioned is that all of the drivers are women because the men would not go fast enough for the schedule.
NEWS
Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
A proposal to run a maglev train in the Northeast comes with a hefty price tag - approximately $10 billion just for the segment between Baltimore and Washington. Though the technology holds the promise of transporting passengers from one city to the next in 15 minutes, promoters will have to overcome the legacy of other promising projects that busted their budgets or turned out different than they looked on the drawing board. Big Dig By the early 1990s, traffic in Boston's Central Artery, an elevated six-lane highway that ran through the city's downtown, left traffic crawling for more than 10 hours a day. The Massachusetts Turnpike Authority started construction in 1991 to replace the Central Artery with an underground eight- to-10-lane expressway to combat the congestion.
NEWS
Michael Dresser and Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
Maglev is back, tantalizing Marylanders with the promise of speeds that could whisk train passengers from Baltimore to Washington in 15 minutes. What is billed as a new generation of magnetic levitation technology is at the heart of the latest proposal, the first step in what would eventually be a line taking passengers from Washington to New York in 60 minutes at a cruising speed of 311 mph. The proposal resurrects a technology that seemed to...
BUSINESS
By David Conn | November 12, 1991
A futuristic 300 mile-an-hour train that would run silently between Washington and Baltimore moved one step closer to reality yesterday as Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke appointed a committee to help promote the magnetic levitation rail line for Baltimore.The maglev train, as it is known, could rush commuters between the two cities in as few as 15 minutes, not counting a stop at the Baltimore-Washington International Airport. But it probably won't be built here unless the mayor's Maglev Advisory Committee can raise $500,000 from non-federal sources to match a grant included in the U.S. Transportation Department's appropriation bill.
NEWS
By Tom Wilcox and Don Fry | January 27, 2003
TWO IMPORTANT and highly visible efforts to transform Baltimore's regional transportation system have been put forth - the magnetic levitation train, or maglev, and the MTA's regional rail plan, a collaboratively developed 40-year blueprint for the area's mass transit system. These two are not, as some might suggest, rival predators struggling for control of a single bone of attention and funding. Neither are they separate but equally crucial opportunities for our city and state. In fact, maglev and the rail plan offer a happy synergy, like the parallel rails - or the pair of opposing magnets - of Baltimore's track to the future.
NEWS
January 24, 2011
I am happy that you did not mention Mag-Lev in your editorial on high speed rail ( "Working on the railroad," Jan. 23). The proposed Baltimore-Washington Mag-Lev would be a disaster partly because it would be incompatible with all existing railroad track and trains. On the other hand, high speed rail is completely compatible with our existing system. Although new track would be needed in some areas, much existing track can be upgraded to the higher standards. Trains can use existing track to enter cities and stations.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
Kevin C. Coates and I didn't exactly get off on the right foot. The longtime advocate for Maglev — for magnetic levitation — train technology wrote that he found my column last week praising a book whose author favored another approach to high-speed rail "offensive. " I wrote back that I found it offensive that he would be offended. He is, after all, executive director of the North American Maglev Transport Institute and ought to have a thicker skin. Eventually, we got past snorting at each other like bull moose in mating season and had a civil exchange of ideas about Maglev technology versus incremental approaches to improved passenger rail service such as those championed by author James McCommons in his book "Waiting on a Train.
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