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NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 2005
The young magician stood before a group of children and declared that he could read their minds. After scribbling a prediction on a board and covering it with his jacket, 16-year-old Natan Lefkowits chose four volunteers. Three of them picked a three-digit number and whispered it to Natan, who wrote down each one. The fourth volunteer added the numbers and wrote the sum on the board. Natan then revealed his prediction. It matched exactly. The Clemens Crossing resident probably didn't read anyone's mind.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Claire Wang and Claire Wang,SUN STAFF | March 10, 2005
In a single afternoon, you can take your kids to see a magic show, enjoy karate school demonstrations, experience a simulated home fire drill and examine baby strollers from a local store that designed one to give to actress Julia Roberts. And you can do it all in one place. Kidz Konvention 2005, being held Sunday at the Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City, will have dozens of vendors and entertainment acts for expectant parents, parents and young children. "The purpose of this event is to gather together everything there is to do for kids in the region so that parents and kids can enjoy the day," said Regina Ford, Turf Valley marketing director.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2004
Albert J. Dennis, a one-time newspaper reporter and political aide whose true love was performing magic, died Thursday at Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in St. Mary's County of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 78. Born and raised in East Baltimore, Mr. Dennis quit high school to devote himself to magic. He became acquainted with the art when a magician visited his grandfather, who for many years had been a circus performer. The magician taught the young Mr. Dennis several tricks and piqued his interest in magic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun Staff | October 3, 2004
Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell, by Susanna Clarke. Bloomsbury. 782 pages. $27.95. In England, it is the worst of times. Politicians watch nervously as Napoleon's armies sweep though Europe. King George III is barking mad and his government universally detested. The Raven King -- Britain's greatest magician -- has been gone for at least 200 years and practical magic has almost completely disappeared from English life. Two magicians hope to bring it back. The first is Gilbert Norrell, a humorless recluse from York who has spent a lifetime hoarding books about magic and painstakingly teaching himself the craft.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2004
When Kenny Cooper walks through Baltimore-Washington International Airport, people still call him "Coach" and ask about the team. And though Cooper is now a businessman in Dallas, it is fitting he is still identified with the indoor soccer team that would not even have come to Baltimore if not for him. Cooper and all-star players Mike Stankovic and the late Stan Stamenkovic will become the first inductees into the Blast Hall of Fame tonight during a...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 28, 2003
Magic's not what it used to be, in the days before television when music halls, vaudeville circuits and Earth's largest theaters could be packed by a great conjurer. But for some of us the fascination lives on. And for us comes a delightful new book -- Hiding the Elephant: How Magicians Invented the Impossible and Learned to Disappear, by Jim Steinmeyer (Carroll & Graf, 384 pages, $26). Steinmeyer is a modern master. Fascinated from childhood, he collected books, commercial tricks and then worked as an assistant to a number of established performing magicians.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 19, 2003
LONDON - For more than a month, the American street magician and illusionist David Blaine has dangled about 60 feet in the air inside a clear plastic box not much bigger than a deep bathtub, looking down at crowds gathered to peer up at him near the banks of the River Thames. He pledged to survive only on water, and he has done nothing in the way of magic: no great escape, no disappearing act, no prestos to make a monkey appear in the box with him. But as he prepares to end his 44-day feat by leaving the box today, Blaine has, without trying, gotten a lot of British people wondering.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jennifer McMenamin and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2003
Magician Ray-Mond Corbin was the first performer to appear at an art deco theater that opened in 1930s Westminster. He went on to play before the queen of England, Baltimore nightclub crowds and, having made his reputation in the world of illusion, generations of Carroll County schoolchildren. Mr. Corbin died Friday of complications from a broken hip at St. Luke's Mayo Clinic Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla., where he kept a home. The Westminster resident was 86. A memorial service Saturday at the renovated art deco Carroll Theater is expected to draw admirers from across the county and a contingent of magicians flying from a national convention in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | January 19, 2003
In the beginning, there was film. And sound. The two have been inseparable for roughly a century. But wait -- the first movies were silent, and "talkies" only arrived in the late 1920s, so what's this about a century of sound and film? It's simple. "Silent films were never silent," says composer and conductor John Williams, whose memorable film scores have earned him five Oscars. "There was always music to go with them." Once sound-on-film became possible, the marriage of the visual and aural arts blossomed even more, producing an extraordinary musical legacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | November 7, 2002
Come dressed as your favorite Harry Potter character this weekend to Port Discovery. It's all part of the third annual "Wizards' Weekend" of activities, games and contests relating to young magician Harry Potter and the books about him. Upon arrival, visitors will receive their Hogwarts class schedule -a virtual "to do" list of events at the museum. Among the array of activities are a scavenger hunt, wand-making and the Hogwarts Final Exam. "Wizards' Weekend" runs 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and noon-5 p.m. Sunday at Port Discovery, 35 Market Place.
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