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Magic Words

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NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff Writer | May 28, 1992
Two weeks from now, Julia Jung will stack the wooden blocks, push in the red plastic chairs, hug the last child and finally, after 21 years, leave kindergarten.The veteran Oakhill Elementary School teacher is retiring this June, and she is in a happy, unhappy haze of anticipation."This is my swan song," she says, and tears well in her blue eyes. "After you've been someplace this long, you cannot walk out and be really happy."Through a kaleidoscope of emotion, Jung is leaving a world of jump ropes and sand buckets, teddy bears and globes -- and children to whom "everything is wonderful, everything is fun," she says.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
Rob Gonzalez seldom gets caught in the gridlock that snarls Route 30 in Hampstead each weekday morning - neither would you if you got to work at 3:30 a.m. But rush hour is another matter. "It can take 20 minutes to go three miles; you literally have to plan for that," said Gonzalez, owner of Snickerdoodles, a bakery-cafe on Route 30. During rush hour, he and other local residents all but avoid the road frequented by ex-Marylanders who now live as far as 15 miles to the north in Hanover, Pa., but still work and do business here.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | December 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- While Congress continues to dither over campaign finance reform, a fight is being waged at the level of the Federal Election Commission over a major loophole in federal campaign spending that now permits buying ads supporting or opposing a candidate without having the ads' cost charged against federal candidate limits.Under existing law, such ads may be run as long as the ads don't ''express advocacy'' of a candidate, or oppose one. But what constitutes ''express advocacy'' has been interpreted differently by two federal circuit courts, and the Supreme Court in October declined to step in.'Magic words'One court has ruled unless an ad includes what have been called ''magic words,'' instructing voters to ''vote for'' or ''elect'' or ''vote against'' a specific candidate, it can say basically whatever it wants, even if the substance supports or is in opposition to a candidate.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | July 31, 2006
Since this is the height of vacation season and everyone's walking around with a camera and snapping pictures, it's a good time to address something that's ticked me off for years. And that is: People who don't say "1 ... 2 ... 3" before they take your picture. In other words, people who snap your picture without any kind of cue or heads-up. What is the deal with these people? Here we have a long, proud history in this country of not actually snapping a picture until you say "1 ... 2 ... 3."
NEWS
By Fay Lande | August 20, 1993
IN 1987 I had two mastectomies, leaving me, as one of my children said, "without boobs." Several years later, the feelings of grief and loss finally surfaced for me in a form I could understand.Neither doctors nor hospital staff spoke to me about these feelings before or after the surgery and, for a long time, I was embar rassed to acknowledge having them. After all, it seemed like petty carping when I was still alive and others I knew had died.If each of us is meant to sing our own song, this, I thought, is part of mine.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | October 14, 1991
I write so frequently about Microsoft Windows that I often forget about people like my friend Sam.Four or five years ago, Sam bought an IBM XT-compatible machine that he uses mainly for word processing. It's hopelessly out of date by today's standards, but Sam doesn't know that. It still does what he hired it to do -- churn out stories, letters and the kids' term papers -- and he's happy with it.A few days ago Sam stopped by the desk and asked, "What's this Windows business you write about all the time?
NEWS
By Mark Fleming | October 6, 1991
Can you say, "tax base"?Careful, now.These are magic words on the lips of bureaucrats, developers and businessmen who use them as if the door to all sorts of wonders wouldswing open majestically if only we had a greater tax base.Need anew road or school?Chant, "tax base."Sewer plant overflowing?Whisper it reverently: "tax base."Ever see a small group of bright-eyed, sweating men huddled over a tiny pair of rolling white cubes, cursing excitedly and murmuring incantations like "come to papa" and "baby needs a new pair of shoes"?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynell George and Lynell George,Los Angeles Times | September 13, 1999
Did your summer fling start out footloose and fancy-free in June? Shift into hot and steamy come July? Shoot off the charts by August?Well, summer's over, and like every other, uh, sorta good thing, this too must come to an end -- and fast. Now you have to figure out how to break The News. Problem is you've worn out your best friend's ears with all the Technicolor, surround-sound details, so how do you disengage?Like just about everything else in this high-tech age, if a couple of well-turned keystrokes brought you together, a different combination can help dig you out. If you want to send a Dear John e-mail or create a hand-tailored, hard-copy farewell, you can strike the right balance with a few tools -- all easily available online.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Universal Press Syndicate | January 13, 1992
Two of the most damaging words in the English language are also two of the most common: "Don't cry."Tears come for many reasons. But inevitably they cause a problem, especially when the tears spring from grief.The problem doesn't belong to the grieving, tearful person; tears help relieve the pressure of overwhelming emotions. More likely, the tears cause a problem for those of us who find ourselves watching someone cry.Our problem is as common -- and as human -- as tears. It's as simple as a reddened face, and it's called embarrassment.
NEWS
September 10, 1990
3 Magic WordsEditor: Amidst all the hurley-burley of rhetoric about the education dilemma it was refreshing to read in Alice Steinbach's column the conviction of Tracy Kidder that ''public education rests precariously on the skill and virtue of people at the bottom of the institutional pyramid -- the teachers."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Shovan and By Laura Shovan,Special to the Sun | September 29, 2002
After four hours of driving, I turn off the highway into the Skylands region of northern New Jersey. The two-lane road is wooded. Breaks in the trees offer glimpses of unfarmed fields and quiet ponds. At 6 p.m., the parking lot of Historic Waterloo Village is still crowded. The last of several school groups are loading teen-agers onto buses. Though they've been here since early this morning, students from the Milwaukee High School of the Arts in Wisconsin are debating about who gets to stay for the evening concert.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | May 3, 2000
Are the Orioles for real? Their age, defense and pitching lapses suggest no. Their ability to repeatedly overcome such deficiencies suggests yes. They did it again last night, scoring twice in the ninth inning off Anaheim closer Troy Percival to defeat the Angels, 7-6. Last season, they found ways to lose. This season, they find ways to win, more often than not. `To get to the playoffs, you've got to win games like this," catcher Charles Johnson said. "During the course of the year, it will take games like this to get us where we need to be."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynell George and Lynell George,Los Angeles Times | September 13, 1999
Did your summer fling start out footloose and fancy-free in June? Shift into hot and steamy come July? Shoot off the charts by August?Well, summer's over, and like every other, uh, sorta good thing, this too must come to an end -- and fast. Now you have to figure out how to break The News. Problem is you've worn out your best friend's ears with all the Technicolor, surround-sound details, so how do you disengage?Like just about everything else in this high-tech age, if a couple of well-turned keystrokes brought you together, a different combination can help dig you out. If you want to send a Dear John e-mail or create a hand-tailored, hard-copy farewell, you can strike the right balance with a few tools -- all easily available online.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | December 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- While Congress continues to dither over campaign finance reform, a fight is being waged at the level of the Federal Election Commission over a major loophole in federal campaign spending that now permits buying ads supporting or opposing a candidate without having the ads' cost charged against federal candidate limits.Under existing law, such ads may be run as long as the ads don't ''express advocacy'' of a candidate, or oppose one. But what constitutes ''express advocacy'' has been interpreted differently by two federal circuit courts, and the Supreme Court in October declined to step in.'Magic words'One court has ruled unless an ad includes what have been called ''magic words,'' instructing voters to ''vote for'' or ''elect'' or ''vote against'' a specific candidate, it can say basically whatever it wants, even if the substance supports or is in opposition to a candidate.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,SUN STAFF | February 19, 1997
At Westinghouse Electric Corp., David Oros got used to supervising armies of engineers working on glamorous projects. But that was before the Pentagon canceled the A-12 fighter program.The A-12 cancellation was a decision that forced a few thousand Westinghousers to consider new careers. For the 37-year-old former head of Westinghouse's wireless data systems group, that new career came by breaking out of defense contracting and forming Aether Technologies LLC, a new wireless services company in Owings Mills that he hopes -- and others are betting -- can be just as glamorous as fighter planes.
NEWS
By Fay Lande | August 20, 1993
IN 1987 I had two mastectomies, leaving me, as one of my children said, "without boobs." Several years later, the feelings of grief and loss finally surfaced for me in a form I could understand.Neither doctors nor hospital staff spoke to me about these feelings before or after the surgery and, for a long time, I was embar rassed to acknowledge having them. After all, it seemed like petty carping when I was still alive and others I knew had died.If each of us is meant to sing our own song, this, I thought, is part of mine.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein | February 4, 1992
As Alice in Wonderland might say, Magic Johnson's basketball situation is getting curiouser and curiouser.It is no longer an argument solely over whether the retired NBA superstar, who is infected with the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome, should be allowed to participate in Sunday's All-Star game and the summer Olympics in Barcelona. A far bigger issue is whether he should be reactivated by the Los Angeles Lakers this season.Each day, Johnson seems to be leaning closer toward rejoining the Lakers, who have managed to remain competitive in his absence, only four games back of the division-leading Portland Trail Blazers.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN COLUMNIST | July 31, 2006
Since this is the height of vacation season and everyone's walking around with a camera and snapping pictures, it's a good time to address something that's ticked me off for years. And that is: People who don't say "1 ... 2 ... 3" before they take your picture. In other words, people who snap your picture without any kind of cue or heads-up. What is the deal with these people? Here we have a long, proud history in this country of not actually snapping a picture until you say "1 ... 2 ... 3."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 16, 1993
"Hocus Pocus"Starring Bette Midler, Sarah Jessica Parkerand Kathy NajimyDirected by Kenny OrtegaReleased by DisneyRated PG... ** As Shakespeare would have certainly written if he'd been on the movie beat, "Double, double toil and trouble, movie stink and critic bubble/'Hocus Pocus' has no focus/has no rhyme, has no reason/ and is . . . out of season."The movie begins with its foot in the bucket and never gets out. I mean, it is somewhat difficult to do a frothy musical parody when the first scene depicts the comical murder of a darling little girl whose "life vapors" are sucked out of her by a trio of third-rate actresses.
NEWS
By Leslie H. Gelb | May 7, 1993
THERE is an old and wise rule of thumb about Arab-Israeli relations. If they seem to be getting better, just wait a while and they'll almost always get worse.Yet in the current round of talks in Washington, Israelis and Palestinians are actually making progress for the first time. And while Syrians and Israelis haven't gone forward, they haven't gone backward either.Two words explain this fragile and unlikely state of affairs: Islamic fundamentalism.Where war and the threat of war have failed to overcome mutual Arab-Israeli hatreds, fundamentalist fanatics have made peace look almost appetizing.
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