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NEWS
August 9, 2011
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was instrumental in landing Baltimore's first Grand Prix automobile race next month. It's destined to be a great profit-making extravaganza. But after the last car passes the finish line, the giddiness wanes and we clamber back to normalcy, the myriad problems facing our city will still be there. A high-profile automobile race will allow local folks only temporary respite from the real issues that somehow just don't seem to go away on their own. If only Mayor Rawlings-Blake could wave a magic wand like the Good Witch Glinda in "The Wizard of Oz" and eradicate homicides, the homeless situation, gang violence and rampant drug abuse.
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NEWS
August 9, 2011
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake was instrumental in landing Baltimore's first Grand Prix automobile race next month. It's destined to be a great profit-making extravaganza. But after the last car passes the finish line, the giddiness wanes and we clamber back to normalcy, the myriad problems facing our city will still be there. A high-profile automobile race will allow local folks only temporary respite from the real issues that somehow just don't seem to go away on their own. If only Mayor Rawlings-Blake could wave a magic wand like the Good Witch Glinda in "The Wizard of Oz" and eradicate homicides, the homeless situation, gang violence and rampant drug abuse.
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NEWS
By Luc Sante | December 10, 1993
THE usual imperative of those who would contemplate an event like Tuesday's Long Island Rail Road massacre is to "make sense" of it. While the wish is reasonable, no more sense can be made of such a thing than of a typhoon or cyclone.Forget the gunman's declared motive of racial hatred: When someone with a semiautomatic weapon starts perforating citizens en masse, the question of motive evaporates.Whether the action is purported to have arisen from race or religion or ball scores or indigestion or orders from beyond, the gunman's explanations are as immaterial as anybody else's.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman and Steve Chapman,Chicago Tribune | July 23, 2007
CHICAGO -- Of all the ideas on how to combat global warming, few have more obvious appeal than producing cars that get better mileage. The Sierra Club says a boost in fuel economy standards "is the biggest single policy step" the government can take. Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois went to Detroit in May to advise the auto industry that this change would "help bring it into the 21st century." And last month, the Senate voted to require that each automaker's fleet of cars and trucks average at least 35 miles to the gallon by 2020.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions have developed a computer-assisted "magic wand" they say will greatly reduce the risks of brain surgery.The prototype device, tested and developed at Hopkins, "could revolutionize" neurosurgery, Dr. Donlin Long, the neurosurgeon in chief, said yesterday at a science writers' seminar called "Beyond Radiology: All Things Exposed."So far, the wand has been tested on three brain tumor patients "with dramatic results," Long said. "We were able to reduce the size of incisions into the skull and brain and minimize potential brain damage."
NEWS
May 1, 2005
HE'D WAVE a magic wand, if he could. He'd hold hands with a Saudi prince, and he did. He'd even sign the bill passed by the House last month that includes generous tax breaks for the highly profitable oil and gas industry he admits are unnecessary. President Bush's desire to look as if he's trying to do something about soaring gasoline prices seems sincere enough. The cost of fuel is a pocketbook issue that could be a real threat to Mr. Bush's party at the polls. And yet he's ignoring the chance to use his leadership and political clout to help Americans save money at the pumps in the quickest, most environmentally friendly way possible: by using less gas. If the president would throw his support behind raising the fuel-efficiency standards for SUVs and light trucks, he'd be doing a great favor for owners of the ubiquitous gas-guzzling vehicles.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman and Steve Chapman,Chicago Tribune | July 23, 2007
CHICAGO -- Of all the ideas on how to combat global warming, few have more obvious appeal than producing cars that get better mileage. The Sierra Club says a boost in fuel economy standards "is the biggest single policy step" the government can take. Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois went to Detroit in May to advise the auto industry that this change would "help bring it into the 21st century." And last month, the Senate voted to require that each automaker's fleet of cars and trucks average at least 35 miles to the gallon by 2020.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 27, 1996
You use it all the time. Odds are, you have more than one, since there now are more of them than there are of us.To most of us, it is simply "the remote" -- as in, "Where's the remote?" That's the thing about it: The only time we give the remote control device any thought is when we're trying to find it. Otherwise, it's just this little plastic box with buttons that we wave in the general direction of whatever it is we want to change.Forty years after its invention, the remote control has changed programming, advertising and even you. It has added firepower to the war between the sexes.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | February 17, 2006
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-- --Orioles pitchers and catchers ran and threw here yesterday for the first time this year. Another annual baseball rite of mid-February happened the day before, when anti-urgency super agent Scott Boras finally procured a contract for his last remaining high-profile client, pitcher Jeff Weaver. Weaver and the Los Angeles Angels agreed to a one-year, $8.325 million deal that could be worth nearly $9 million if he meets certain incentives. With it, an Orioles fan's worst nightmare became official.
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III | January 14, 2001
Alan Greenspan has pulled off many an economic miracle as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. Remember the Crash of '87, when, as the newly minted Fed chief, Greenspan stepped off an airplane in Dallas to learn that the Dow had dropped 508 points? He averted a crisis by boosting liquidity, and the expansion continued for another three years. In 1994, with the U.S. economy accelerating and inflation worries spiraling, the Greenspan-led Fed boosted interest rates enough to engineer a "soft landing" - and in 1995 the central bank cut rates fast enough and deep enough to avert a recession and continue the expansion.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | February 17, 2006
Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-- --Orioles pitchers and catchers ran and threw here yesterday for the first time this year. Another annual baseball rite of mid-February happened the day before, when anti-urgency super agent Scott Boras finally procured a contract for his last remaining high-profile client, pitcher Jeff Weaver. Weaver and the Los Angeles Angels agreed to a one-year, $8.325 million deal that could be worth nearly $9 million if he meets certain incentives. With it, an Orioles fan's worst nightmare became official.
NEWS
May 1, 2005
HE'D WAVE a magic wand, if he could. He'd hold hands with a Saudi prince, and he did. He'd even sign the bill passed by the House last month that includes generous tax breaks for the highly profitable oil and gas industry he admits are unnecessary. President Bush's desire to look as if he's trying to do something about soaring gasoline prices seems sincere enough. The cost of fuel is a pocketbook issue that could be a real threat to Mr. Bush's party at the polls. And yet he's ignoring the chance to use his leadership and political clout to help Americans save money at the pumps in the quickest, most environmentally friendly way possible: by using less gas. If the president would throw his support behind raising the fuel-efficiency standards for SUVs and light trucks, he'd be doing a great favor for owners of the ubiquitous gas-guzzling vehicles.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 6, 2002
AT THIS rate, future archaeologists will think civilization in much of industrial Baltimore ended around 1980. The ancient Trojans constructed nine cities on top of one another, recycling building sites as needed to stay on the real estate of their ancestors. Modern Baltimoreans stopped after one or two layers and bugged out to Harford County. In Baltimore, a city of 49,000 acres, some 3,000 acres that once held businesses and factories lie vacant or unused. Partly as a result, Baltimore has lost a tenth of its jobs over the past decade, with predictable fiscal and social consequences.
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III | January 14, 2001
Alan Greenspan has pulled off many an economic miracle as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. Remember the Crash of '87, when, as the newly minted Fed chief, Greenspan stepped off an airplane in Dallas to learn that the Dow had dropped 508 points? He averted a crisis by boosting liquidity, and the expansion continued for another three years. In 1994, with the U.S. economy accelerating and inflation worries spiraling, the Greenspan-led Fed boosted interest rates enough to engineer a "soft landing" - and in 1995 the central bank cut rates fast enough and deep enough to avert a recession and continue the expansion.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
They look for all the world like the drawings of a child enchanted by an imaginary fantasy land, spilled out onto paper in a wondrous explosion of Crayola primary colors. Beneath the smiling sun that is also a gigantic light bulb, kids slide through pipes in an oversize mystery house, search mazes and pyramids for the lost pharaoh's tomb, swing from a trapeze in a three-story, futuristic playland best scaled not by stairs but by rope ladders and bridges.These drawings, appearances notwithstanding, flow not from the hand of an artistic prodigy blessed with a fertile imagination, but from grown men and women who puzzled two years over precisely what the four colorful images should show.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | July 27, 1996
You use it all the time. Odds are, you have more than one, since there now are more of them than there are of us.To most of us, it is simply "the remote" -- as in, "Where's the remote?" That's the thing about it: The only time we give the remote control device any thought is when we're trying to find it. Otherwise, it's just this little plastic box with buttons that we wave in the general direction of whatever it is we want to change.Forty years after its invention, the remote control has changed programming, advertising and even you. It has added firepower to the war between the sexes.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | March 6, 2002
AT THIS rate, future archaeologists will think civilization in much of industrial Baltimore ended around 1980. The ancient Trojans constructed nine cities on top of one another, recycling building sites as needed to stay on the real estate of their ancestors. Modern Baltimoreans stopped after one or two layers and bugged out to Harford County. In Baltimore, a city of 49,000 acres, some 3,000 acres that once held businesses and factories lie vacant or unused. Partly as a result, Baltimore has lost a tenth of its jobs over the past decade, with predictable fiscal and social consequences.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
They look for all the world like the drawings of a child enchanted by an imaginary fantasy land, spilled out onto paper in a wondrous explosion of Crayola primary colors. Beneath the smiling sun that is also a gigantic light bulb, kids slide through pipes in an oversize mystery house, search mazes and pyramids for the lost pharaoh's tomb, swing from a trapeze in a three-story, futuristic playland best scaled not by stairs but by rope ladders and bridges.These drawings, appearances notwithstanding, flow not from the hand of an artistic prodigy blessed with a fertile imagination, but from grown men and women who puzzled two years over precisely what the four colorful images should show.
NEWS
By Luc Sante | December 10, 1993
THE usual imperative of those who would contemplate an event like Tuesday's Long Island Rail Road massacre is to "make sense" of it. While the wish is reasonable, no more sense can be made of such a thing than of a typhoon or cyclone.Forget the gunman's declared motive of racial hatred: When someone with a semiautomatic weapon starts perforating citizens en masse, the question of motive evaporates.Whether the action is purported to have arisen from race or religion or ball scores or indigestion or orders from beyond, the gunman's explanations are as immaterial as anybody else's.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions have developed a computer-assisted "magic wand" they say will greatly reduce the risks of brain surgery.The prototype device, tested and developed at Hopkins, "could revolutionize" neurosurgery, Dr. Donlin Long, the neurosurgeon in chief, said yesterday at a science writers' seminar called "Beyond Radiology: All Things Exposed."So far, the wand has been tested on three brain tumor patients "with dramatic results," Long said. "We were able to reduce the size of incisions into the skull and brain and minimize potential brain damage."
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