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Magic Moment

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NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | April 5, 2012
The threat of lightning brought a public address directive to leave the ever-dampening seating bowl, and we had all taken refuge in the concourses of Oriole Park to wait out the rain delay. Red Sox fans were ubiquitous, each wearing some form of team logo, along with the smug visage that accompanies a $160 million payroll. For several years, as attendance has dwindled in the face of what now seems to be endless losing by the hometown team, the appearance of swarms of Boston fans has been as predictable as a periodic cicada infestation, as, in droves, they have taken over our lovely ballpark with a haughty air of entitlement.
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NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | April 5, 2012
The threat of lightning brought a public address directive to leave the ever-dampening seating bowl, and we had all taken refuge in the concourses of Oriole Park to wait out the rain delay. Red Sox fans were ubiquitous, each wearing some form of team logo, along with the smug visage that accompanies a $160 million payroll. For several years, as attendance has dwindled in the face of what now seems to be endless losing by the hometown team, the appearance of swarms of Boston fans has been as predictable as a periodic cicada infestation, as, in droves, they have taken over our lovely ballpark with a haughty air of entitlement.
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SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder | April 16, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Magic Johnson has lived his basketball life by the credo that it is indeed better to give than to receive. And last night, after giving everyone in the Forum another Magic moment to remember him by, he wanted to be sure to thank the people who gave him life."
SPORTS
December 30, 2009
Why do we love watching sports? And what did we love the most in 2009? Those are two questions each of us would answer differently. But the answer to the second question helps explain the answer to the first. We love watching sports because they are a Rorschach inkblot test for our emotions. And we file away certain memories from any given year based on what we love about the games we watch and play.
SPORTS
By Mark Heisler and Mark Heisler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2002
SPRINGFIELD, Mass. - The one, the only, the unforgettable and irreplaceable Magic Johnson is going into the Hall of Fame. Gee, no kidding. This one has been on the schedule since that night in 1980 when Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was out and Johnson jumped center in the NBA Finals, getting 42 points, 15 rebounds and seven assists against the Philadelphia 76ers and leading the Showtime Lakers to the first of five titles. He was a 20-year-old rookie. Forget the old line about waiving the five-year rule.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau Nelson Schwartz of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | September 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Tomorrow night, President Clinton will explain why he believes it is necessary to reform the nation's health care delivery system -- a massive overhaul of one-seventh of the nation's economy.His aides have already asserted that this initiative is the "defining issue" of the Clinton presidency, but he indicated yesterday that in his mind the stakes are even higher:The nation is at an historic "magic moment" in which the battle over health care will reveal whether the United States has the will to confront its deepest problems, asserted the president, flanked by former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, as he met with influential physicians.
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUSINESS EDITOR | October 9, 1991
Are you ready for some football?With the Orioles' season over, Memorial Stadium officially designated a relic, and the politically correct name for the new field finally decided, it's time to move on to that other great pastime of grown-up male children -- pro football.In the business community, this means turning our attention to the city's chances of winning one of the two precious expansion slots up for grabs in the National Football League. This is no idle topic among grown-up male children because common wisdom does not place Baltimore among the top two candidates for a new franchise.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
Some first date. First he makes a joke of buying drinks at the bar for another woman who is drunk and, it appears, homeless. Then, as Bohager's sound system plays Van Morrison's "Brown Eyed Girl," he turns to his date and says: "Can I call you my brown eyed girl?"Better yet, bonehead, call me a cab.All right, his date, Margaret, a graphic designer from Baltimore, doesn't say that. She doesn't know what to say. At such moments, words may fail. Yet the gut speaks loudly. Two words: Check, please ...Consider it the opposite of a magic moment.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1997
Tonight there's pretty standard Saturday night stuff, meaning it's a good night to spend out on the town. There is a good flick on USA, but that's not the place you should watch it."Lifepoints: A Woman's Guide to Health" (7: 30 p.m.-8 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Mary Beth Marsden and Sherry Jones are the hosts of this look at women's health issues, produced in co-operation with St. Joseph Medical Center."The World's Wildest Magic" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Set yourself up for a night of illusions, prestidigitation and just plain trickery, thanks to Penn and Teller, the Amazing Jonathan and a host of other magicians.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 14, 1997
Zany, wacky, goofy and even pretty darn nutty, here comes "Touch," which refers not to low-impact football but to the finger of the Almighty.Derived from an Elmore Leonard novel by Paul ("Taxi Driver") Schrader and starring Christopher Walken, the movie carries with it expectations that everybody is only too happy to smash to pieces. No, darn it, it's not a sleazy, violent, tensely plotted, quirky tale of small-beer crooks and cops, as one might expect from the magic teaming of the Leonard, Schrader and Walken sensibilities.
NEWS
By Algerina Perna and Algerina Perna,Sun Photographer | December 16, 2007
When I got a positive answer to my request to photograph the annual holiday lighting of the historic Washington Monument in Mount Vernon and the spectacular display of fireworks that accompanied it, I was both excited and a little apprehensive. The pressure was on to record this Charm City ritual for the front page on deadline, and to shoot video for The Sun's Web site. I set up a tripod for the still camera in an 11th-floor room at the Peabody Court Hotel at the west side of Mount Vernon Square, an often-used vantage point for photographing the monument.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | June 28, 2006
Country singer LeAnn Rimes meets the Dance Theatre of Harlem on PBS' In Performance at the White House series tonight, and the result is proof positive of art's ability to span cultural divides. Rarely has the East Room shone as brightly as it does when Rimes' sublime interpretation of "Over the Rainbow" is further voiced through the perfectly pitched movements of a young dancer on In Performance at the White House: Dance Theatre of Harlem. Not to make too much of the moment, but on paper, Rimes' inclusion in a program billed as a "celebration of the Dance Theatre of Harlem" seemed questionable.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 25, 2006
Every time someone addresses the worrisome state of classical music, at least one exception gets mentioned - the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. Since the inquisitive and inspiring Michael Tilson Thomas became music director in 1995, the ensemble has been on a steadily upward trajectory. A volatile mixture of standard and far-from-common repertoire has proven to be highly marketable. Grammy-winning recordings of Mahler symphonies - Tilson Thomas and the orchestra are putting the complete cycle on disc - have reinforced the stature of the organization.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 9, 2005
HE'S DANCED and sung in a rock band. He's taught puppets to dance in the Broadway musical Avenue Q. Now Kenneth Lee Roberson will bring a touch of the tropics to Baltimore when he directs and choreographs the West Indian-flavored Once on This Island at Center Stage from Dec. 16-Jan. 22. The Lynn Ahrens-Stephen Flaherty musical is adapted from Rosa Guy's novel, My Love, My Love, which is in turn adapted from Hans Christian Andersen's The Little Mermaid. "The magic is in the storytelling, and it's in the movement," Roberson says.
NEWS
By Norman Allen | August 21, 2005
THE MAGIC began on a Saturday afternoon when my parents, sister and I climbed the steps to the balcony of the Curran Theater in San Francisco. We took our seats. The lights dimmed, the overture began and a scene from Edwardian England appeared far below us. I was 7 years old. It was my first trip to the theater. And I was ready. Seven is young to be attending a full-length Broadway musical. As an adult theatergoer, I would not be pleased to find myself seated next to a child that age, especially when paying $100 for the ticket.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
When Pope John Paul II visited St. Mary's Seminary and University in Roland Park in 1995, he spent about 15 minutes at the final stop of his Baltimore visit praying silently in the back pew of the seminary's cavernous, dimly lighted chapel. Though the pope said little to the students and faculty at the nation's oldest Roman Catholic seminary, the Rev. Robert R. Leavitt recalls the visit as "one of the most magical moments of my priesthood," adding that the pontiff's peaceful presence awed and inspired seminarians.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - It's a good thing Jarvis Hayes has a healthy sense of humor, not to mention a pretty good sense of self, or he might take this getting ignored thing to heart. It's not often a first-round NBA draft choice, not to mention the 10th overall selection, can be virtually ignored, but Hayes, a 6-foot-7 swingman, has managed that feat in the past two weeks. Hayes was immediately upstaged not once, but twice on draft night last month, when the Wizards first signed veteran guard Jerry Stackhouse to a contract extension, then took Maryland point guard Steve Blake with their second-round selection.
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