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By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | March 28, 1995
For most people, maggots and leeches are gross and disgusting. Even though they were once used medically, most modern practitioners are put off by these creatures as much as their patients are.But the loathsome leech and the lowly maggot are experiencing a comeback, especially with certain plastic surgeons on the cutting edge.The resurgence of interest can be traced to Vietnam, where medics sometimes relied on maggots to repair severely infected tissue. Dr. Joe Upton, a surgeon at Harvard, remembered his Vietnam experience when he was faced with an impossible task in 1985.
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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
The popular Burger King restaurant on Fort Meade, shut down this week when workers discovered an infestation of maggots, has reopened after an all-clear from the installation's public health team. Col. Edward C. Rothstein, commander of the Army base in Anne Arundel County, closed the restaurant Wednesday after the insect larvae were discovered during repairs to a soda machine. The infestation apparently developed around a leak behind a panel that was inaccessible to restaurant workers, according to base officials.
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NEWS
April 6, 2009
Older women can add to strength Most people can build muscle through strength training, it has long been thought - even people in their 80s who have never hoisted a dumbbell. But it may be time to tweak that idea. A new study found that women in their 80s who do resistance training might not boost their muscle mass. However, this doesn't mean older women are off the hook from working out - the study also found that despite the lack of muscle growth, the participants could lift more weight after the weight-training program.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | November 17, 2009
Two Baltimore sisters charged in the death of their paraplegic mother pleaded guilty to first-degree vulnerable adult abuse in Baltimore City Circuit Court on Monday. Tia Sewell, 27, and Sharon Jones, 26, face up to six years in prison under the plea agreement. Sentencing is scheduled for Dec. 28. Their mother was 40-year-old April Montford. Paramedics discovered Ford Feb. 29, 2008, after being called to her house in the 400 block of W. Franklin St. According to court records, police said Montford, who was paralyzed from a 1985 gunshot wound, was lying on bedsheets that had been unchanged for years.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
ADVISERS AT the Food and Drug Administration took time out last week to determine how best to regulate leeches and maggots for use on ailing humans. Turns out these creepy-crawlies are accounted as medical devices; the question is how stringent a review their "manufacturers" will have to undergo before they may bring them to market. Why "devices"? Because they chew, which is a mechanical process, says the FDA. One could call them the oldest bits of biotechnology. Certainly the squirmiest.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | June 22, 1993
The prognosis is not good for a young bald eagle found staggering down the middle of a rural Edgewater road yesterday.The eagle, which was rescued by two passing motorists, faces a "nip and tuck" battle for its life, a Baltimore veterinarian said.The 1- to 2-year-old bird "should be strong and at its peak," said Kim Hammond, owner of the Falls Road Animal Hospital, where it is being treated in a "shock trauma" unit for shock, a broken wing and multiple puncture wounds.The young bird hasn't yet grown its signature crown of white feathers, he added.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | March 13, 1991
A drug-addicted mother whose neglected baby was found covered with maggots three days after his birth last summer has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for child abuse.Tears streaked the thin face of Margo Bryant, 28, as she pleaded with Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Hilary D. Caplan to give her a light sentence."Your honor, I know what I did was wrong," said Bryant, who has tried to kick a cocaine habit with acupuncture treatment. "I can't change what I did."Caplan shot back: "You're lucky you're not here on a murder charge."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | November 17, 2009
Two Baltimore sisters charged in the death of their paraplegic mother pleaded guilty to first-degree vulnerable adult abuse in Baltimore City Circuit Court on Monday. Tia Sewell, 27, and Sharon Jones, 26, face up to six years in prison under the plea agreement. Sentencing is scheduled for Dec. 28. Their mother was 40-year-old April Montford. Paramedics discovered Ford Feb. 29, 2008, after being called to her house in the 400 block of W. Franklin St. According to court records, police said Montford, who was paralyzed from a 1985 gunshot wound, was lying on bedsheets that had been unchanged for years.
NEWS
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 2006
The signature family expression of joy or hangdog remorse might be more than a matter of monkey see, monkey do. It might be hard-wired into our brains. By comparing the videotaped facial responses of 21 people born blind with those of their family members, researchers at the University of Haifa in Israel found similarities in expressions of concentration, sadness, anger, disgust, joy and surprise. "There's plenty of evidence that facial expressions are inherited," says Gili Peleg, a doctoral candidate at the university's Institute of Evolution and lead investigator on the study.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 20, 2005
WHETHER YOU are rich or poor, young or old, wired or wireless, your trash stinks. It is part of the cycle of life. After expiration comes redolent decomposition, especially in August. Anyone caught downwind of a fragrant sanitation truck recognizes this aroma as part of a Maryland summer. Proust had cookies to link him to memories of his past, we have the bouquet of spent crabs and other leavings from the summer table. Part of our civic duty, our contribution to the commonwealth, is to donate waste, sometimes twice a week, to the municipal scrap heap.
NEWS
April 6, 2009
Older women can add to strength Most people can build muscle through strength training, it has long been thought - even people in their 80s who have never hoisted a dumbbell. But it may be time to tweak that idea. A new study found that women in their 80s who do resistance training might not boost their muscle mass. However, this doesn't mean older women are off the hook from working out - the study also found that despite the lack of muscle growth, the participants could lift more weight after the weight-training program.
NEWS
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | October 27, 2006
The signature family expression of joy or hangdog remorse might be more than a matter of monkey see, monkey do. It might be hard-wired into our brains. By comparing the videotaped facial responses of 21 people born blind with those of their family members, researchers at the University of Haifa in Israel found similarities in expressions of concentration, sadness, anger, disgust, joy and surprise. "There's plenty of evidence that facial expressions are inherited," says Gili Peleg, a doctoral candidate at the university's Institute of Evolution and lead investigator on the study.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
ADVISERS AT the Food and Drug Administration took time out last week to determine how best to regulate leeches and maggots for use on ailing humans. Turns out these creepy-crawlies are accounted as medical devices; the question is how stringent a review their "manufacturers" will have to undergo before they may bring them to market. Why "devices"? Because they chew, which is a mechanical process, says the FDA. One could call them the oldest bits of biotechnology. Certainly the squirmiest.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 20, 2005
WHETHER YOU are rich or poor, young or old, wired or wireless, your trash stinks. It is part of the cycle of life. After expiration comes redolent decomposition, especially in August. Anyone caught downwind of a fragrant sanitation truck recognizes this aroma as part of a Maryland summer. Proust had cookies to link him to memories of his past, we have the bouquet of spent crabs and other leavings from the summer table. Part of our civic duty, our contribution to the commonwealth, is to donate waste, sometimes twice a week, to the municipal scrap heap.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2004
Enough already. Now that Ken Jennings, a baby-faced software engineer from Salt Lake City, has become the first person in Jeopardy! history to win $1 million, it's time for him to call it quits. It's the only way out, since it seems that no one can come close to toppling him. Jennings, whose 30th appearance yesterday earned him $1,004,960, has done it in dominating fashion. He does not squeak by with $1 margins of victory and "Final Jeopardy!" cliffhangers. Instead, he tosses off competitors as if they had just wandered over from the Wheel of Fortune set. On Monday night, Jennings won with $52,000.
FEATURES
By Isaac Guzman and Isaac Guzman,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 10, 2001
Most Americans can thank Anthony Soprano Jr. for introducing them to the masked troubadours known as Slipknot. The mini-Mafioso of The Sopranos, played by Robert Iler, was frequently seen wearing his favorite T-shirt, adorned with the Slipknot logo. Given Tony Jr.'s hormone-driven mood swings and adolescent disaffection, it's no wonder he's a "maggot," the preferred term of endearment for hard-core Slipknot fans. The group's brutal imagery, jackhammer guitars and ghoulish howls seem to have been designed to thrill teen-age boys while simultaneously ticking off their parents.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2004
Enough already. Now that Ken Jennings, a baby-faced software engineer from Salt Lake City, has become the first person in Jeopardy! history to win $1 million, it's time for him to call it quits. It's the only way out, since it seems that no one can come close to toppling him. Jennings, whose 30th appearance yesterday earned him $1,004,960, has done it in dominating fashion. He does not squeak by with $1 margins of victory and "Final Jeopardy!" cliffhangers. Instead, he tosses off competitors as if they had just wandered over from the Wheel of Fortune set. On Monday night, Jennings won with $52,000.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
The popular Burger King restaurant on Fort Meade, shut down this week when workers discovered an infestation of maggots, has reopened after an all-clear from the installation's public health team. Col. Edward C. Rothstein, commander of the Army base in Anne Arundel County, closed the restaurant Wednesday after the insect larvae were discovered during repairs to a soda machine. The infestation apparently developed around a leak behind a panel that was inaccessible to restaurant workers, according to base officials.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | March 28, 1995
For most people, maggots and leeches are gross and disgusting. Even though they were once used medically, most modern practitioners are put off by these creatures as much as their patients are.But the loathsome leech and the lowly maggot are experiencing a comeback, especially with certain plastic surgeons on the cutting edge.The resurgence of interest can be traced to Vietnam, where medics sometimes relied on maggots to repair severely infected tissue. Dr. Joe Upton, a surgeon at Harvard, remembered his Vietnam experience when he was faced with an impossible task in 1985.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | June 22, 1993
The prognosis is not good for a young bald eagle found staggering down the middle of a rural Edgewater road yesterday.The eagle, which was rescued by two passing motorists, faces a "nip and tuck" battle for its life, a Baltimore veterinarian said.The 1- to 2-year-old bird "should be strong and at its peak," said Kim Hammond, owner of the Falls Road Animal Hospital, where it is being treated in a "shock trauma" unit for shock, a broken wing and multiple puncture wounds.The young bird hasn't yet grown its signature crown of white feathers, he added.
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