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By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 5, 1998
"Gangbusters: The Destruction of America's Last Mafia Dynasty," by Ernest Volkman. Faber and Faber. 256 pages. $24.95.Former Gambino family crime boss John Gotti, a.k.a. the "TefloDon," is doing life without possibility of parole at hard-time Marion Federal Penitentiary, which sums up how far the godfathers have fallen. But justice was a long time coming. For decades, the FBI's war on organized crime ("OC") consisted of rounding up the usual suspects (mainly gamblers and numbers writers) and chalking up stats.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
In New York City in the 1930s, '40s and '50s, when city laws made it illegal to serve gay patrons or hire gay employees, it took a lot of money and clout for a gay establishment to stay ahead of the vice police and remain open. The city's entrenched Mafia, of course, had both, and "specialized in illegal markets, which is what gay bars became in Gotham," writes 41-year-old Federal Hill resident Alex Hortis in his new book, " The Mob and the City ," due out from Prometheus Books next week.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 3, 1995
ROME -- Giulio Andreotti, a former prime minister and a symbol of the now-collapsed Italian political establishment, has been indicted and ordered to stand trial in September on charges that he acted as a protector for the Mafia during his many years in power.Prosecutors will seek to prove that Mr. Andreotti did favors for the Mafia in return for political support in Sicily for the Christian Democratic Party, which dominated the Italian government for decades after World War II.Mr. Andreotti, 76, could face a 20-year prison sentence if convicted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Allison Brickell and For The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
On Saturday, crowds of people will gather at St. John's Church in Charles Village to experience the eighth annual Pile of Craft. It is, organizers say, a different sort of craft show. About 50 vendors will be there selling items in a variety of media, including paintings, plush toys, soaps, repurposed clothing and pottery. Michael Bracco, one of the founding members of the Charm City Craft Mafia, which organized the event, said that while he mostly targets 18- to 35-year-olds, he also finds unexpected customers for his Spaghetti Kiss science fiction-themed apparel at the show.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 16, 1992
Now we are being told that the Mafia, as we know it -- and most of us know it only by movies and myth -- is not expected to survive. The New York City trial of John Gotti, a mob boss of People magazine dimensions, is said to mark the last chapter of organized crime in the United States. For those who are inclined to buy into this line, I say caveat emptor.That the demise of any single man could finish modern organized crime is a theory of law enforcement and media that has been proven wrong again and again.
NEWS
By Jonathan Kwitny | September 12, 1990
ATTY. GEN. Richard Thornburgh and the Federal Bureau of Investigation both say they have no evidence of any large-scale involvement of organized crime in the savings and loan disaster. But how would they know? From what the FBI told me, it never took the first logical step to find out.The same goes for evidence now coming from the Houston Post of looting by at least some people with CIA affiliations. The government says there's no big problem, but apparently nobody with subpoena power has bothered looking.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | April 30, 1995
"Excellent Cadavers: The Mafia and the Death of the First Italian Republic," by Alexander Stille. 467 pages. New York: Pantheon. $27.50Alexander Stille's history does what history should: it tells a story that makes sense of what occurred in a specific place during a period of time. The subject is Italy during the years between the end of World War II and the dissolution of the Cold War. These two events, like bookends in time, embrace a period of unprecedented prosperity as Italy grew into the fifth industrial power in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Rodricks and By Dan Rodricks,Sun Staff | May 20, 2001
"I Don't Want To Go To Jail," by Jimmy Breslin. Little, Brown. 306 pages. $24.95. Connoisseurs of a specific kind of nonfiction -- fine reporting or commentary written on deadline -- should find a well-stocked used-book store and dig for "The World of Jimmy Breslin," a paperback with a black-and-white cover photograph of the New York columnist on a telephone in what appears to be a bar. It's a collection of the early, good Breslin, perhaps the best Breslin,...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 18, 1991
TAURIANOVA, Italy -- There were no police around the day the Mafia came calling.The date was May 3, the time 5:30 in the afternoon, the place a small neighborhood grocery store on the Via Solferino.Owner Giuseppe Grimaldi, 54, was standing behind the deli counter when he saw the hit men coming. He grabbed a long, sharp knife made for slicing bread and cheese.Before he could use it, he was shot dead. So was his brother, Giovanni.The killers took the bread knife and cut off Giuseppe's head.
NEWS
By New York Times | November 9, 1990
Battered by aggressive investigators and weakened by incompetent leadership, most of America's traditional Mafia families appear to be fading out of existence, law-enforcement officials and independent experts say.The Mafia remains potent in the New York City area, where officials say it is hard to uproot because it has five separate and large crime families, and in the suburbs of Chicago.But in most other areas, where prosecutors have to contend with only a single family, the legendary mob that once controlled whole labor unions, city governments and criminal enterprises has clearly lost its grip.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Christopher Gaul, former managing editor of the Catholic Review and reporter for The Sun and The Evening Sun and area television stations, died of lung cancer Thursday at his home in Essex. He was 72. He joined the Catholic Review as a writer in 1995 and worked there until he retired in 2005. George P. Matysek Jr., the Review's assistant managing editor, remembered Mr. Gaul as a mentor to the junior writers at the paper, taking time to carefully edit their work. "He really showed us what went into a good story," Mr. Matysek said, "He was very nurturing in how he dealt with younger writers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | June 9, 2011
A ctor Chazz Palminteri (“The Usual Suspects,” “A Bronx Tale”) has partnered with Aldo’s owners Sergio and Alessandro Vitale to open a new restaurant in Harbor East called Chazz: A Bronx Original. With its soft opening Friday, Palminteri’s restaurant is styled after the eateries on Arthur Avenue in the Bronx and will feature classic Italian-American dishes. Palminteri sat down with b to discuss his restaurant, movies, the mafia and the proper way to eat a slice of pizza.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
For Americans, Gomorrah will play like every other Mafia epic - and no other Mafia epic. The movie is named for Sodom's sister city and for the crime syndicate Camorra, which has made a Gomorrah out of Naples, Italy. The director, Matteo Garrone, working in the charged, realistic style of his predecessor Francesco Rosi (Salvatore Giuliano), achieves a journalistic drive on a scale so broad that it takes your breath away. Like Rosi, Garrone puts together a machine-gun mosaic as he depicts the Camorra's domination of everything from public housing to toxic-waste disposal and high fashion.
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | January 31, 2009
TNA's latest attempt to attract mainstream publicity is to offer the position of chairman of The Main Event Mafia to ousted Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich. TNA made the announcement in a news release yesterday. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ringposts)
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | January 17, 2009
The feud between The Main Event Mafia and The Front Line is becoming a little less one-sided, but the original premise has gotten convoluted in the process. It wasn't working, because the heels were booked to be cool and calculating, while the babyfaces were booked to be incompetent. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ringposts)
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | June 24, 2008
Three 6 Mafia Last 2 Walk Grade: D+ For a decade, Three 6 Mafia was relatively unknown outside the gritty, grimy confines of underground Southern rap. But then the Memphis collective flew up the pop charts in 2005 with the catchy, sinister "Stay Fly." And the next year, Three 6 Mafia became the first rap act to pick up an Oscar for best original song for "It's Hard Out Here for a Pimp" from the movie Hustle & Flow. Immediately after that baffling win, the group (now a duo made up of core members Juicy J and DJ Paul)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 14, 1993
ROME -- When Sicilian magistrates announced Friday that they had struck a major blow against the Mafia, the contrast between the hoopla surrounding the event and the questions that followed evoked a land that seems unsure of itself, even in victory.For some, the magistrates' identification of suspects in the killing of Judge Giovanni Falcone, who died in a bombing in May 1992, was cause for celebration."This is a magical moment in Italian history," said Giovanni Tinebra, who headed the inquiry that led to the issuing of 18 arrest warrants for 18 suspects Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David W. Marston and David W. Marston,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2004
For American organized crime, the beginning of the end came in 1992. That's when the feds, armed with RICO, the anti-racketeering law, and the blood-drenched testimony of serial mob hitter Sammy "The Bull" Gravano, finally proved that while New York's last big don was indisputably dapper, he was not, after all, Teflon. Convicted on a wide-ranging racketeering indictment, John Gotti was sentenced to life without parole, solitary confinement 23 hours a day, the hardest of hard time. By the time throat cancer finally killed Gotti in 2002, it was widely accepted that the mob was also dead, ravaged by the same lethal combination of RICO and rats that had toppled Gotti.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 2008
This may not be such a good time for the rich and powerful. Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton was punished for her drive, money and influence with a third-place finish in Iowa. Even Republicans turned up their noses at the wealthy, well-groomed Mitt Romney and chose a populist from Arkansas. Last week a former Goldman Sachs banker was sentenced to prison for several years for insider trading. On TV Cashmere Mafia's pilot repeats at 10:01 p.m. tomorrow on WMAR, Channel 2
NEWS
January 3, 2008
SALVATORE BONANNO, 75 Grew up in Mafia family Salvatore "Bill" Bonanno, the oldest son of the late New York City crime chieftain Joe Bonanno and author of a book about growing up in a Mafia family, has died. He was 75. Los Angeles literary agent Mickey Freiberg said Mr. Bonanno died Tuesday in Tucson, Ariz. The cause of death was a heart attack, said Anthony Tarantola, Mr. Bonanno's nephew. Mr. Bonanno wrote Bound by Honor: A Mafioso's Story in 2000. His Web site describes him as an author, movie producer and lecturer.
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