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By John H. Gormley Jr | February 24, 1991
It's a winner-take-all game for high stakes, as the ports of Baltimore and Hampton Roads, Va., vie for the business of Maersk Line.Maersk handles more cargo than any other container line in Baltimore's port -- about 500,000 tons a year, more than 12 percent of the containerized traffic handled here.If Maersk chooses Baltimore, it would return to Baltimore the weekly ship now calling on Hampton Roads. That would mean an additional 250,000 tons of cargo coming here annually.But much more than cargo hangs in the balance.
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BUSINESS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
For the fourth time in his 4 1/2 years in office, Gov. Parris N. Glendening will travel overseas on a trade mission. His seven-day trip to Europe, which starts tomorrow, will focus on bringing airline and shipping business, as well as cultural offerings, to the state.Glendening, his wife and seven state employees will visit Denmark, Italy and England -- at a cost of up to $48,000 to Maryland taxpayers, according to Michael Morrill, the governor's spokesman. After the trade mission ends, the Glendenings will tack on a family vacation at their own expense, Morrill said.
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BUSINESS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
For the fourth time in his 4 1/2 years in office, Gov. Parris N. Glendening will travel overseas on a trade mission. His seven-day trip to Europe, which starts tomorrow, will focus on bringing airline and shipping business, as well as cultural offerings, to the state.Glendening, his wife and seven state employees will visit Denmark, Italy and England -- at a cost of up to $48,000 to Maryland taxpayers, according to Michael Morrill, the governor's spokesman. After the trade mission ends, the Glendenings will tack on a family vacation at their own expense, Morrill said.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | February 24, 1991
It's a winner-take-all game for high stakes, as the ports of Baltimore and Hampton Roads, Va., vie for the business of Maersk Line.Maersk handles more cargo than any other container line in Baltimore's port -- about 500,000 tons a year, more than 12 percent of the containerized traffic handled here.If Maersk chooses Baltimore, it would return to Baltimore the weekly ship now calling on Hampton Roads. That would mean an additional 250,000 tons of cargo coming here annually.But much more than cargo hangs in the balance.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | December 17, 1991
An article in yesterday's Business section used an incorrect shipping route to show how the port of Baltimore would benefit from a new agreement between Maersk Line and American Transport Lines Inc.The article should have said cargo originating in South America and bound for Northern Europe would be unloaded from an AmTrans ship in Baltimore and reloaded onto a Maersk vessel here.+ The Sun Regrets the errors.Maersk Line and Crowley Maritime Corp. have reached an agreement that will make Baltimore a hub for cargo moved jointly the two lines.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | May 20, 1995
Maersk Line will resume its South American service out of Baltimore, meaning the return of a container ship a week that had been shifted to Hampton Roads, Va., Baltimore's primary competitor in the mid-Atlantic region.The resumption of the weekly service stems from Maersk's decision to enter a vessel-sharing agreement with Transroll/Sea-Land to provide more frequent service to South America.The new service, which begins in mid-June, will feature two weekly departures from the United States to the East Coast of South America, with one service calling at Baltimore and the other calling at Hampton Roads.
NEWS
December 16, 1991
Rep. Helen Bentley last week proclaimed 1991 as the year the Port of Baltimore began to reverse its long decline. That's an optimistic message, but there is evidence to support the claim. For the first time in recent memory, the good news from the port has outnumbered the stories of labor unrest or departing shipping lines. Some contracts -- notably the Maersk Line's 10-year lease and the deal that lured the Orient Overseas Container Line back from Hampton Roads, Va. -- represent major successes.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | February 25, 1991
NEW YORK -- A group of shipping lines plans to raise freight rates from the West Coast to Europe by approximately 10 percent on March 15, officials of the group said.Prices will increase by $100 for a 20-foot container, $200 for a 40-foot unit and $250 for a refrigerated box, said Allan Peicher, regional commercial manager in San Francisco for the USA-North Europe Rate Agreement.The members of the agreement are Atlantic Container Line, Compagnie Generale Maritime, Hapag-Lloyd AG, Maersk Line, Nedlloyd Lines BV, P&O Containers Ltd. and Sea-Land Service Inc.Currently, the rate for shipping a 20-foot container to Europe is about $1,000, he estimated.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 6, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- It was a rare day for Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday -- the chance to bask in the warm glow of the success of the port of Baltimore."
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
In a move that might aid the port of Baltimore, the world's three largest shipping companies announced that they will form a global alliance to boost fleet capacity and reduce operating costs. If the partnership of the Maersk Line, Mediterranean Shipping Co. and CMA CGM, survives potential anti-trust hurdles, more container traffic could come Baltimore's way, port officials say. Swiss-based MSC is the port's biggest customer. "We could see MSC ships coming here carrying Maersk and CMA cargo in addition to its own. [It]
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 27, 1990
Both labor and management officials remained upbeat yesterday about the prospects for avoiding a dockworkers strike later this week, despite their inability to reach agreement over the weekend on a contract proposal."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
The Mediterranean Shipping Co. will increase by several thousand containers the cargo it moves through the port of Baltimore under an agreement announced yesterday with the Maryland Port Administration.The agreement gives the company special rates for cargo moved through the Seagirt Marine Terminal to and from southern and western destinations. The increased business in the port stems largely from improved rail service at the 2-year-old Seagirt terminal.Last year, the CSX Corp., one of two major railroads serving Baltimore, opened a rail yard at Seagirt as it closed its Potomac Yards facilities in Alexandria, Va. That will enable companies like Mediterranean to ship more cheaply by rail directly from the port, rather than trucking cargo first to Alexandria.
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