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By Norah Vincent and By Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2001
Mae West: An Icon in Black and White, by Jill Watts. Oxford University Press. 374 pages. $35. If the mere mention of that rusty triad of words so beloved of academics everywhere -- race, class and gender -- doesn't send you into immediate paroxysms of rage against the p.c. machine, then you won't be bothered in the least by Jill Watts' new biography of Mae West. And if you're sufficiently inured to that other irritating academics' tendency to shuttle all available information into the prescribed categories of a distinctly postmodernist worldview, then you'll have all your cherished notions about "subversiveness" gently reaffirmed by this book.
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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Some would say that Philip Krach is just a gardener, a man whose existence revolves around the seasons, the emergence of hundreds of iris blooms and roses in the spring, the relentless growth of weeds and grass in the summer, the quick disappearance of the perennials in the fall frost. But watch Krach take hold of a pair of electric hedge clippers at Ladew Topiary Gardens and attack the yew, carving perfect straight lines and curves that only he seems to see so clearly in his mind's eye. Working on a 10- to 15-foot high topiary seahorse, he wields the clippers as though they are an extension of his arms and hands, with a flick of the elbow or wrist this way or that producing a clean line.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
In a 1913 vaudeville show that toured the country, one routine featured a melodically undistinguished Tin Pan Alley song called "And Then." It wouldn't have made much of an impression, except for the startlingly suggestive spin put on it by a 20-year-old woman named Mae West when she sang such lines as: "He saw me home last evening all alone; of course, I asked him to come in. Oh, joy! Some boy!" For the rest of her life, West served as the ultimate innuendo machine, a slow-speaking, forcibly curvaceous, almost supernaturally blond symbol of everything that decent folks warned you against.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Some would say that Philip Krach is just a gardener, a man whose existence revolves around the seasons, the emergence of hundreds of iris blooms and roses in the spring, the relentless growth of weeds and grass in the summer, the quick disappearance of the perennials in the fall frost. But watch Krach take hold of a pair of electric hedge clippers at Ladew Topiary Gardens and attack the yew, carving perfect straight lines and curves that only he seems to see so clearly in his mind's eye. Working on a 10- to 15-foot high topiary seahorse, he wields the clippers as though they are an extension of his arms and hands, with a flick of the elbow or wrist this way or that producing a clean line.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 14, 2001
Mae West was one of a kind -- a bawdy, outspoken sex symbol who made her own way in a world dominated by men. All of those qualities are present in Dirty Blonde, Claudia Shear's three-person show about West, which transferred from off-Broadway to Broadway and now is on tour. The show is more than a bio-drama, however. As conceived by Shear and the play's director, James Lapine, it also chronicles the unconventional relationship between two avid West fans -- Jo, an aspiring actress, and Charlie, a film librarian.
NEWS
By Lucille Bjanes | January 16, 1996
IN 1921 WHEN I was 10 years old, my ambition was to grow up and have a bosom like Mae West's.When I was 15 and living in Manhattan, I yearned to ride a horse in Central Park. Riding lessons were expensive and at that time a riding habit was a necessity. Girls may ride in jeans now, but they didn't wear pants then (except underneath). On a salary of $15 a week it was an impossible dream.Later I envisioned myself as a dancer, willowy and graceful, in beautiful flowing gowns, dazzling an audience with the intricacies and perfect execution of my choreography.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | May 17, 1991
THERE HAS BEEN so much advance publicity about the Madonna movie there are hardly any surprises when you actually see the film. In fact, there are no surprises.Of course, we still have the star, Madonna. She's a little girl, dressed up in clothes that may have belonged to Second Hand Rose's mommy. She talks dirty and comes on like a new Mae West, but a Mae West with no mystery.It's hard not to like her, though. And it's hard not to like her film, even if you do get a little tired of it. Finally, you get a little too much of the star and her supporting performers praying before some of her concerts, and you get a little too much of the star carrying on with the dancers in her show.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Some would say that Philip Krach is just a gardener, a man whose existence revolves around the seasons, the emergence of hundreds of iris blooms and roses in the spring, the relentless growth of weeds and grass in the summer, the quick disappearance of the perennials in the fall frost. But watch Krach take hold of a pair of electric hedge clippers at Ladew Topiary Gardens and attack the yew, carving perfect straight lines and curves that only he seems to see so clearly in his mind's eye. Working on a 10- to 15-foot high topiary seahorse, he wields the clippers as though they are an extension of his arms and hands, with a flick of the elbow or wrist this way or that producing a clean line.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
Some would say that Philip Krach is just a gardener, a man whose existence revolves around the seasons, the emergence of hundreds of iris blooms and roses in the spring, the relentless growth of weeds and grass in the summer, the quick disappearance of the perennials in the fall frost. But watch Krach take hold of a pair of electric hedge clippers at Ladew Topiary Gardens and attack the yew, carving perfect straight lines and curves that only he seems to see so clearly in his mind's eye. Working on a 10- to 15-foot high topiary seahorse, he wields the clippers as though they are an extension of his arms and hands, with a flick of the elbow or wrist this way or that producing a clean line.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser | March 2, 1997
1995 Hedges Cabernet-Merlot, Columbia Valley ($11.29).This red-wine blend, from an excellent Washington state winery, offers firm structure and ripe, voluptuous black currant and black cherry fruit. It's a full-bodied, forward wine in the Mae West style. There's also enough backbone here to let this wine age for a good five years.Pub date: 3/2/97
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
In a 1913 vaudeville show that toured the country, one routine featured a melodically undistinguished Tin Pan Alley song called "And Then." It wouldn't have made much of an impression, except for the startlingly suggestive spin put on it by a 20-year-old woman named Mae West when she sang such lines as: "He saw me home last evening all alone; of course, I asked him to come in. Oh, joy! Some boy!" For the rest of her life, West served as the ultimate innuendo machine, a slow-speaking, forcibly curvaceous, almost supernaturally blond symbol of everything that decent folks warned you against.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 14, 2001
Mae West was one of a kind -- a bawdy, outspoken sex symbol who made her own way in a world dominated by men. All of those qualities are present in Dirty Blonde, Claudia Shear's three-person show about West, which transferred from off-Broadway to Broadway and now is on tour. The show is more than a bio-drama, however. As conceived by Shear and the play's director, James Lapine, it also chronicles the unconventional relationship between two avid West fans -- Jo, an aspiring actress, and Charlie, a film librarian.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and By Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | July 29, 2001
Mae West: An Icon in Black and White, by Jill Watts. Oxford University Press. 374 pages. $35. If the mere mention of that rusty triad of words so beloved of academics everywhere -- race, class and gender -- doesn't send you into immediate paroxysms of rage against the p.c. machine, then you won't be bothered in the least by Jill Watts' new biography of Mae West. And if you're sufficiently inured to that other irritating academics' tendency to shuttle all available information into the prescribed categories of a distinctly postmodernist worldview, then you'll have all your cherished notions about "subversiveness" gently reaffirmed by this book.
NEWS
By Lucille Bjanes | January 16, 1996
IN 1921 WHEN I was 10 years old, my ambition was to grow up and have a bosom like Mae West's.When I was 15 and living in Manhattan, I yearned to ride a horse in Central Park. Riding lessons were expensive and at that time a riding habit was a necessity. Girls may ride in jeans now, but they didn't wear pants then (except underneath). On a salary of $15 a week it was an impossible dream.Later I envisioned myself as a dancer, willowy and graceful, in beautiful flowing gowns, dazzling an audience with the intricacies and perfect execution of my choreography.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | May 17, 1991
THERE HAS BEEN so much advance publicity about the Madonna movie there are hardly any surprises when you actually see the film. In fact, there are no surprises.Of course, we still have the star, Madonna. She's a little girl, dressed up in clothes that may have belonged to Second Hand Rose's mommy. She talks dirty and comes on like a new Mae West, but a Mae West with no mystery.It's hard not to like her, though. And it's hard not to like her film, even if you do get a little tired of it. Finally, you get a little too much of the star and her supporting performers praying before some of her concerts, and you get a little too much of the star carrying on with the dancers in her show.
NEWS
March 29, 2005
Andrew Toti, 89, inventor of the inflatable Mae West vest that saved the life of thousands of World War II pilots, including future President George H.W. Bush, died Tuesday at his home in Modesto, Calif. He held more than 500 patents, including one for the pull tab on soda and beer cans. He also invented the automatic chicken plucker, which revolutionized the poultry business. Ken Johnson, 53, the drummer for acts including Ike and Tina Turner, the Steve Miller Band, Kenny Neal and bluesman James Cotton, died of diabetes complications March 19 in Jonesboro, Ga. Billed as Kenny "The Snake" Johnson, he played 13 years with the James Cotton Blues Band and recorded two albums with Steve Miller - Fly Like an Eagle and Book of Dreams.
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