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By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
It's interesting watching Mark Turgeon, isn't it? The Maryland coach prepares for practices and games by giving his players thoughts and themes to focus on. It turns out he also orchestrates home crowds -- not just his players. Did you see him during Sunday's Virginia game? Waving toward the crowd and disputing officials' calls? He picked up a technical in the second half. It's almost as if he's still the feisty, undersized Kansas point guard hoping his "gumption" -- the word he often uses -- will rub off on his team.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
It's interesting watching Mark Turgeon, isn't it? The Maryland coach prepares for practices and games by giving his players thoughts and themes to focus on. It turns out he also orchestrates home crowds -- not just his players. Did you see him during Sunday's Virginia game? Waving toward the crowd and disputing officials' calls? He picked up a technical in the second half. It's almost as if he's still the feisty, undersized Kansas point guard hoping his "gumption" -- the word he often uses -- will rub off on his team.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1996
Impossible Industrial Action will present the world premiere of Polish playwright Stanislaw Witkiewicz's "The Madman and the Nun" at the Theatre Project beginning WednesdaySet in a mental hospital, the play focuses on a novice nun assigned to help rehabilitate a mad poet. To create an evening of what Witkiewicz called "pure form," director Tony Tsendeas has come up with a multimedia production concept that includes slide projections and an original score.Show times at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St., are 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays, through April 28. Tickets are $14. Call (410)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2008
Iggy Pop & The Stooges ESSENTIALS: Iggy Pop's stage name has nothing to do with his music. Punk, not pop, has been Iggy's forte since he first came to the American music scene in the '60s. A true innovator of the genre, he has been taking fans on a wild ride for nearly four decades, and they have been his willing passengers all the while. WHAT TO EXPECT: Iggy is a feat of age-defying stamina, bounding around the stage like a madman (many times, shirtless). The newer tunes don't exactly have the edge that the classics do, but Iggy still has all the energy of years past.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 11, 2005
THE MUSIC plays on. Al "Madman" Baitch, 80 years old, assures this yesterday morning as he bounces from his car toward Miller's Deli at the Greenspring Shopping Center, defying every lurking pneumococcus in the morning chill, and also defying the odds. His career is entering the springtime of its 65th year. He wears a brand-new pacemaker, which will have to learn to move to the rhythm of the Madman. Baitch goes back to weekend nights atop Keith's Roof, where guys wore zoot suits and the dancing was interrupted only by the fights.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 22, 1994
In real estate, they say location is everything. That's true, too, for new TV shows. No single factor is more important than where a show is located on the prime-time schedule.No new series makes that point better than "Madman of the People," the NBC sitcom starring Dabney Coleman, which will premiere at 9:30 tonight on WMAR (Channel 2).I don't think much of "Madman." But it is the one new series that virtually every advertising agency media buyer has picked as a hit.It's not that the ad gang thinks all that much more of the quality of "Madman" than I do, but it's got one of best locations in all of prime time.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 18, 1996
The set for "The Madman and the Nun" at the Theatre Project is a huge padded cell. To one side is a metallic door, two stories high and trapezoidal in shape. Above the cell, the padding extends heavenward in flame-like shreds.The jarring angles of the set -- designed by Robb Bauer -- recall another European work about a madman, the German Expressionist movie, "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari." Combined with Scott Rosenfeld's high-contrast lighting and the projections designed by Thomas E. Cole and Sun Kwon, the result is one of the more impressive visual designs ever seen at the Theatre Project.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
You'd think that Jean-Claude Van Damme, cast as a cop wh poses as a prisoner in an undercover assignment, would be able to take care of himself and the film.No go. Not this time. ''Death Warrant'' does nothing for Van Damme and even less for the spectator. Its trouble is that it doesn't know what it wants to be, a prison movie with all the attendant cliches, or another ''Nightmare on Elm Street,'' with all its cliches.What it is, actually, is a combination of all these cliches with some very silly footage of its own.''Death Warrant'' is a brutal movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2008
Iggy Pop & The Stooges ESSENTIALS: Iggy Pop's stage name has nothing to do with his music. Punk, not pop, has been Iggy's forte since he first came to the American music scene in the '60s. A true innovator of the genre, he has been taking fans on a wild ride for nearly four decades, and they have been his willing passengers all the while. WHAT TO EXPECT: Iggy is a feat of age-defying stamina, bounding around the stage like a madman (many times, shirtless). The newer tunes don't exactly have the edge that the classics do, but Iggy still has all the energy of years past.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | November 3, 1994
The fall after Hurricane Andrew devastated parts of South Florida, NBC came up with the presumably clever idea of having the same hurricane "hit" its Saturday-night sitcoms, all set in Miami, so that the same event could befall the characters on "The Golden Girls," "Nurses" and "Empty Nest." Creatively, it was a washout Saturday, but ratings were high, so tonight NBC gives it another shot on another night -- with blackout Thursday.The idea is that Jamie, on "Mad About You," causes a New York blackout that also affects the Big Apple characters of "Friends" and "Madman of the People," but not "Seinfeld."
NEWS
By Jim Jaffe | July 9, 2008
America's physicians are holding their breath as they wait to see how Washington will resolve the latest mess resulting when the methods of "Madman Muntz" meet Medicare. Earl William "Madman" Muntz was the pioneer pitchman who explained his low prices by saying, "I lose money on every one I sell, but I make it up on the volume." His business model is being tested by Medicare, which tries to keep its budget balanced in response to the increasing number of services that doctors provide by reducing the price paid per service.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | March 11, 2005
THE MUSIC plays on. Al "Madman" Baitch, 80 years old, assures this yesterday morning as he bounces from his car toward Miller's Deli at the Greenspring Shopping Center, defying every lurking pneumococcus in the morning chill, and also defying the odds. His career is entering the springtime of its 65th year. He wears a brand-new pacemaker, which will have to learn to move to the rhythm of the Madman. Baitch goes back to weekend nights atop Keith's Roof, where guys wore zoot suits and the dancing was interrupted only by the fights.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | April 24, 2003
DON'T TALK TO David Segui about being put out to pasture. He knows what happens to ballplayers whose time is up. Take his father, for example. Diego Segui, the Cuban emigre who fled his country at age 17 and wound up pitching 15 years in the major leagues, has taken up cattle farming back home in Kansas City, Mo. The father's 30 acres and the son's 60 acres abut, but David has insisted that fences keep his father's cows in their place. "He started with two. He bought them for my grandmother.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | October 8, 2002
CHICAGO -- He's a megalomaniac who has weapons of mass destruction and dreams of conquest. If left alone, he is bound to shatter the stability of the Middle East and the world. Anyone who expects him to behave rationally is deluded. He's so reckless and warlike that there's no telling what he might do. No, I'm not talking about George W. Bush. I'm talking about Saddam Hussein, as portrayed these days by those advocating war with Iraq. They claim we must act now to keep him from getting nuclear warheads and other weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | January 9, 2002
IN ONE of the most poetic and chilling of his narratives, Elie Wiesel tells the story of a small group of Jews gathered together to pray in an underground synagogue during the Nazi occupation. In the middle of the service, the small door burst open to reveal what could only be described as a half-crazed Jew. The man, with that unblinking stare that only accompanies religious fervor and certain kinds of insanity, put both his index fingers to his lips and said, "Shh, don't pray so loudly.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 10, 2001
BEIJING - Zhang Chenggen began last Tuesday morning as he did most, eating breakfast with his 11-year-old son, Zhang Yi. After a bowl of porridge and some buns, the boy headed off to school in their small, poor village of Fanglin in the mountains of Central China's Jiangxi province. As lunchtime approached, Zhang Chenggen was chatting at home with neighbors when he heard the explosion. He rushed to the scene, where he found the two-story school half-demolished with black smoke rising from the ruins.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 6, 1994
None of the new fall shows will beat Glenn Frey's record last year, when his "South of Sunset" series was axed after one airing, but the heads are starting to roll on network row.Don't look for Chad Everett's "McKenna" tonight (or, maybe, any night again) on ABC. The network yanked it from the schedule after just two outings. It will be replaced with the evergreen/ever-gray "Matlock" starting next Thursday.Replacing "McKenna" tonight at 9 on WJZ (Channel 13) is a special, "Billy Ray Cyrus: A year on the Road."
NEWS
By Jim Jaffe | July 9, 2008
America's physicians are holding their breath as they wait to see how Washington will resolve the latest mess resulting when the methods of "Madman Muntz" meet Medicare. Earl William "Madman" Muntz was the pioneer pitchman who explained his low prices by saying, "I lose money on every one I sell, but I make it up on the volume." His business model is being tested by Medicare, which tries to keep its budget balanced in response to the increasing number of services that doctors provide by reducing the price paid per service.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 2, 1999
SIXTEEN SUMMERS ago, the first time I laid eyes on Tom "Goose" Kaiser, he danced out of his Wishing Well Bar and hopped onto a bus he'd chartered to Cooperstown, N.Y., for Brooks Robinson's Hall of Fame induction.It was not yet 6 in the morning, and Goose hadn't been to sleep since maybe the previous decade. A big television screen inside the Wishing Well was showing a stock car race. I thought: Who can watch cars crashing before dawn?As the bus pulled onto Interstate 83 toward Pennsylvania, Goose stood at the front and faced everybody like some cheerleader who'd taken a bad turn.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 16, 1996
Say it ain't so, Bob.But Bob De Niro can't say it ain't so, and Wes Snipes can't say it ain't so either.That's because it is so: The mighty expensive "Fan" has struck out.An extremely overwrought, finally ludicrous stalker thriller set against a background of major league baseball, it appears to have been made by people who never set foot in a ballpark until they showed up at Candlestick Park with $50 million worth of equipment.They don't even get the crack of the bat right. If there's a signature baseball sound, it's the Louisville ash meeting the horsehide, that deeply organic, vibratory SWAK that sends reverberations of sheer quivery pleasure into the center of your ancient brain -- that is, unless it's the other team's guy who's made such good contact, in which case it's the pain center that lights up. Here's how they handle it in "The Fan": BONK!
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