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By Chicago Tribune | February 28, 1993
A recent review of more than a dozen new videos produced three that should be prized additions to any cook's home video library, plus some well-made cassettes that relate to dining.Two cooking videos feature Indian actress and cooking teacher Madhur Jaffrey. Both are designed to help us understand the exotic, spice-oriented cuisines of Asia."Madhur Jaffrey's Far Eastern Cookery: Thailand" ($29.95, 2 hours, distributed by Home Vision Films) is a combination travelogue and cooking lesson. Produced and filmed on location with the usual high production values of the British Broadcasting Corp.
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By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
Best-selling cookbook author Madhur Jaffrey's From Curries to Kebabs: Recipes From the Indian Spice Trail is a welcome addition to the pantry shelf for anyone who savors curries and wants to make them at home. Fans of Jaffrey's earlier books will find this one just as well organized and as richly illustrated. The full-color photographs here are so artful and elegant they leap off the page. Best of all, they lure you through pages of easy-to-follow recipes, all introduced in the savory context of history.
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By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2003
Cold and creamy, a lassi is a perfect treat for a summer day, especially when it's flavored with fresh, ripe fruit. Lassis, as fans of Indian food will know, are similar to milkshakes, except they're made with yogurt rather than ice cream. And like a good milkshake, a lassi is versatile enough to carry a wide variety of flavors. If you're like me, you tasted your first lassi in an adventurous moment at an Indian restaurant. Chances are the flavor was mango, which is always a good choice but especially now when fresh mangoes are abundant.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2003
Cold and creamy, a lassi is a perfect treat for a summer day, especially when it's flavored with fresh, ripe fruit. Lassis, as fans of Indian food will know, are similar to milkshakes, except they're made with yogurt rather than ice cream. And like a good milkshake, a lassi is versatile enough to carry a wide variety of flavors. If you're like me, you tasted your first lassi in an adventurous moment at an Indian restaurant. Chances are the flavor was mango, which is always a good choice but especially now when fresh mangoes are abundant.
NEWS
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2004
Best-selling cookbook author Madhur Jaffrey's From Curries to Kebabs: Recipes From the Indian Spice Trail is a welcome addition to the pantry shelf for anyone who savors curries and wants to make them at home. Fans of Jaffrey's earlier books will find this one just as well organized and as richly illustrated. The full-color photographs here are so artful and elegant they leap off the page. Best of all, they lure you through pages of easy-to-follow recipes, all introduced in the savory context of history.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
Cotton Mary is a conniving, petty, backbiting, egotistical woman whose manners are only partly excused by the fact that she's forced to live under the thumb of a bunch of people no better than she is. As the central figure in the new film from director Ismail Merchant (the producing half of the Merchant-Ivory filmmaking team), she's meant to symbolize the uneasy clash of cultures that continued to bedevil India even after British rule ended. But she's so pervasively unpleasant it's hard to care what happens to her. And the filevils-of-colonialism theme has been played so often that it's just as hard to care about the film, which treads little new ground.
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By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Universal Press Syndicate | July 13, 1994
There are five new books on my desk, each featuring recipes from the Far East, particularly India. Perhaps it indicates a renewed interest in these intriguing, mystical, fragrant and incredibly flavorful cuisines after several lean years of publishing in this field.Foremost among them is "Madhur Jaffrey's A Taste of the Far East" (Carol Southern Books, $35). It is a knockout of a book, which deservedly captured the 1994 Cookbook of the Year award from the James Beard Foundation. With photographers Michael Freeman and James Murphy in tow, this accomplished author takes the reader on a wondrous culinary journey through the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Indonesia and Hong Kong.
FEATURES
By Jeanette Belliveau and Jeanette Belliveau,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 15, 1999
In literature, outstanding books join the canon: a body of great works that can shape a culture.With the holidays approaching, we asked top chefs and others to create a canon of international cookbooks for gift-giving. Regional and ethnic cooking have surged in popularity as more men, women, young people and travelers enter the kitchen, eager to re-create a pasta they enjoyed in Rome, a Senegalese dish for Kwanzaa or tasty vegetarian fare from India.Of course, with 19,000 food and cooking titles listed at Amazon.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 16, 2005
Among the knife-and-fork-carrying masses, there is little doubt that Thanksgiving is the best holiday of the year. It is the right length of time to spend with relatives, three to four days at the most. It is devoted to eating and drinking, not buying presents. And it is a full-employment occasion, meaning there is enough work to keep everybody feeling needed. Yet even this glorious feast can have its trouble spots. The issue, for example, of how you treat your turkey - whether you brine it, barbecue it, deep-fry it or roast it - has become laden with significance.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | June 8, 1994
Whether you're a novice cook or an experienced home chef, Sheila Lukins' first solo effort, "All Around the World Cookbook," provides a rewarding opportunity to be an armchair traveler and experience an array of tastes from exotic lands.Her approach to international cuisine is fun and light-hearted, with the charming visual appeal of her early books co-authored with Julee Ross. There are side bars, charts, picture postcards, "souvenirs to savor," and slices of global life, which make the book entertaining reading and cooking material.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2000
Cotton Mary is a conniving, petty, backbiting, egotistical woman whose manners are only partly excused by the fact that she's forced to live under the thumb of a bunch of people no better than she is. As the central figure in the new film from director Ismail Merchant (the producing half of the Merchant-Ivory filmmaking team), she's meant to symbolize the uneasy clash of cultures that continued to bedevil India even after British rule ended. But she's so pervasively unpleasant it's hard to care what happens to her. And the filevils-of-colonialism theme has been played so often that it's just as hard to care about the film, which treads little new ground.
FEATURES
By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Universal Press Syndicate | July 13, 1994
There are five new books on my desk, each featuring recipes from the Far East, particularly India. Perhaps it indicates a renewed interest in these intriguing, mystical, fragrant and incredibly flavorful cuisines after several lean years of publishing in this field.Foremost among them is "Madhur Jaffrey's A Taste of the Far East" (Carol Southern Books, $35). It is a knockout of a book, which deservedly captured the 1994 Cookbook of the Year award from the James Beard Foundation. With photographers Michael Freeman and James Murphy in tow, this accomplished author takes the reader on a wondrous culinary journey through the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Indonesia and Hong Kong.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | February 28, 1993
A recent review of more than a dozen new videos produced three that should be prized additions to any cook's home video library, plus some well-made cassettes that relate to dining.Two cooking videos feature Indian actress and cooking teacher Madhur Jaffrey. Both are designed to help us understand the exotic, spice-oriented cuisines of Asia."Madhur Jaffrey's Far Eastern Cookery: Thailand" ($29.95, 2 hours, distributed by Home Vision Films) is a combination travelogue and cooking lesson. Produced and filmed on location with the usual high production values of the British Broadcasting Corp.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 18, 2009
On a day that is supposed to bring families together, this dish has a tendency to push them apart. I am talking about cranberries, those tart little berries that everyone feels obligated to serve in some form on Thanksgiving Day. I have nothing against cranberries. I like them, as long as they're fixed the "right way." That means with fresh horseradish, grated ginger, minced garlic and a can of cranberry jelly. This produces a chutney that has zest, fruit and presence.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
When a young woman accompanied her new husband home to Allentown, Pa., for Thanksgiving a few decades ago, she encountered a cranberry relish that so teased and pleased her tongue that she asked her mother-in-law for the recipe. Susan Stamberg later broadcast the recipe over WAMU-FM in Washington, beginning a tradition that for National Public Radio listeners is proof that Thanksgiving is at hand. The exact date of that first broadcast is "lost in the mists of memory," she says, but she thinks this year's recitation, Nov. 16 on NPR's Morning Edition, marked the 29th or 30th rendition of a dish that has taken root on Thanksgiving tables around the country.
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