Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMademoiselle
IN THE NEWS

Mademoiselle

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1990
HOLIDAY and fall dressing moves beyond basic black this year into bright lights worthy of decorating a Christmas tree.Ruby, emerald, and aquamarine blue and pink take a turn in the spotlight for both day and evening. Earrings sway and glitter their way down to the shoulder, and gold baroque jewelry quietly glimmers.Luxury is an essential part of the fashion picture this year. Achieving this in local stores on a reasonable budget is the challenge. Leslie Lynch, fashion merchandising editor at Mademoiselle, suggests women select a few items that appeal from a list of fashion essentials.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 22, 1999
Horst P. Horst, 93, a photographer of the fashionable and the famous, including Harry S. Truman, Marlene Dietrich and Maria Callas, died Thursday in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.Mr. Horst, who worked until 1991, photographed subjects as diverse as Coco Chanel, Jean Cocteau and Andy Warhol, and settings such as the Iranian desert and interiors of Irish castles.Kimberly Jensen, 44, a top New York publishing executive, was found dead in an Ocean City motel room in an apparent suicide, police said Friday.
Advertisement
FEATURES
March 25, 1998
Ever since she was a young mouse, Angelina Ballerina dreamed of becoming a famous ballerina. She danced all the time - doing arabesques through the kitchen, practicing curtsies on her bed and twirling and spinning in the schoolyard. She enrolled in Miss Lilly's Ballet School and remained extremely dedicated to her craft. Angelina is now widely known as the famous ballerina, Mademoiselle Angelina, and people come from far and wide to enjoy her lovely dancing.Book titles in this series by Katharine Holabird include:"Angelina and the Princess""Angelina at the Fair""Angelina Ice Skates""Angelina on Stage""Angelina's Baby Sister"Pub Date: 3/25/98
FEATURES
March 25, 1998
Ever since she was a young mouse, Angelina Ballerina dreamed of becoming a famous ballerina. She danced all the time - doing arabesques through the kitchen, practicing curtsies on her bed and twirling and spinning in the schoolyard. She enrolled in Miss Lilly's Ballet School and remained extremely dedicated to her craft. Angelina is now widely known as the famous ballerina, Mademoiselle Angelina, and people come from far and wide to enjoy her lovely dancing.Book titles in this series by Katharine Holabird include:"Angelina and the Princess""Angelina at the Fair""Angelina Ice Skates""Angelina on Stage""Angelina's Baby Sister"Pub Date: 3/25/98
NEWS
November 22, 1999
Horst P. Horst, 93, a photographer of the fashionable and the famous, including Harry S. Truman, Marlene Dietrich and Maria Callas, died Thursday in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.Mr. Horst, who worked until 1991, photographed subjects as diverse as Coco Chanel, Jean Cocteau and Andy Warhol, and settings such as the Iranian desert and interiors of Irish castles.Kimberly Jensen, 44, a top New York publishing executive, was found dead in an Ocean City motel room in an apparent suicide, police said Friday.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
Penny-pinching has become chic. After all, just about anybody can stay on top of style given enough money and time. A browse through the March magazines yields a mine of ideas on dressing and professional advice.* The editors of Self suggest that you "Swap Till You Drop." For an entertaining evening, gather your friends and neighbors for a clothes swap. You provide some snacks, space for try-ons and a full-length mirror. They bring their unwanted clothes and accessories. Remember, one woman's cast-off may be another's treasure.
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | July 10, 1995
Each year, tennis faces a crises of monumental proportions. It's always right around this time, before, during and after the Grand Slam events in Paris and Wimbledon and as the players fan out for tournaments scheduled everywhere but the North and South Poles.The claim "Tennis is Dead" in big, bold headlines gets things started and corroborating evidence comes pouring in: There are no red-hot rivalries as in days of yore. Too many of the top pros are either boors or boring. The young women dominating their game grab the winner's check and scrub out in their Ferraris.
NEWS
October 18, 1990
A memorial service for Elizabeth W. Shreve, a native of Baltimore, will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Wianno, Mass.Mrs. Shreve, who was 76 and lived in Wianno, died Tuesday at a hospital in Hyannis, Mass.The former Elizabeth Wampole was born in Baltimore and educated at the Ethel Walker School in Simsbury, Conn., the Greenwood School in the Baltimore area and Mademoiselle Bouissierres School inParis.She moved from Baltimore to Boston in 1939 when she married Richard S. Shreve, who is retired as president of the Shreve, Crump & Low jewelry company.
NEWS
October 5, 2006
Tamara Dobson, the Baltimore-born model-turned-actress best known for her leading role in two films as kung fu-fighting government super-agent Cleopatra Jones, died Monday at Keswick Multi-Care Center from complications of pneumonia and multiple sclerosis. She was 59. One of four children of a beauty shop operator and railroad clerk, Miss Dobson was a graduate of Western High School.
NEWS
May 5, 1993
THIS just in from Reuters:"Americans in their 20s, dubbed 'Generation X' because of their indefinability, are not happy with their sex lives, according to a magazine survey released Monday."The survey of 2,500 respondents, conducted by Details and Mademoiselle magazines, also found that two-thirds of men have changed their sexual behavior because of AIDS, but that only 37 percent of women have done so."The survey found that 63 percent of men and 50 percent of women are having sex less often than they want to."
SPORTS
By PHIL JACKMAN | July 10, 1995
Each year, tennis faces a crises of monumental proportions. It's always right around this time, before, during and after the Grand Slam events in Paris and Wimbledon and as the players fan out for tournaments scheduled everywhere but the North and South Poles.The claim "Tennis is Dead" in big, bold headlines gets things started and corroborating evidence comes pouring in: There are no red-hot rivalries as in days of yore. Too many of the top pros are either boors or boring. The young women dominating their game grab the winner's check and scrub out in their Ferraris.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
Penny-pinching has become chic. After all, just about anybody can stay on top of style given enough money and time. A browse through the March magazines yields a mine of ideas on dressing and professional advice.* The editors of Self suggest that you "Swap Till You Drop." For an entertaining evening, gather your friends and neighbors for a clothes swap. You provide some snacks, space for try-ons and a full-length mirror. They bring their unwanted clothes and accessories. Remember, one woman's cast-off may be another's treasure.
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1990
HOLIDAY and fall dressing moves beyond basic black this year into bright lights worthy of decorating a Christmas tree.Ruby, emerald, and aquamarine blue and pink take a turn in the spotlight for both day and evening. Earrings sway and glitter their way down to the shoulder, and gold baroque jewelry quietly glimmers.Luxury is an essential part of the fashion picture this year. Achieving this in local stores on a reasonable budget is the challenge. Leslie Lynch, fashion merchandising editor at Mademoiselle, suggests women select a few items that appeal from a list of fashion essentials.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | December 14, 2011
Apparently Brazil has enough umbrellas or maybe it just doesn't like outsiders sending pointy items in the mail. The international mail company DHL has sent along a list of items that aren't allowed to be shipped to certain countries. If you send one of the forbidden items, you could find it back on your doorstep. DHL, which delivers to more than 220 countries and territories, says these items are verboten: Mexico - computers, liquids and minerals France - imitation pearls containing lead salts (Mon Dieu, if you're sending a mademoiselle jewelry, make sure it's the real thing!
FEATURES
By Donna Peremes | September 23, 1990
Her clothing designs have been seen on the pages of such fashion magazines as Vogue, Elle, Cosmopolitan and Mademoiselle. Her interior designs have appeared in such venerable publications as Architectural Digest and the New York Times Magazine. And within a few weeks her clothes will be appearing in Sears stores around the country.Why Sears?"Why not?" she says in her charming Korean accent. "Everybody asks me that. After all, it is the largest retailer in the United States, and if I want to reach a broader audience, through Sears, almost anybody can buy my things."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.