Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMad
IN THE NEWS

Mad

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Antonio Harrell signed up to design and build competition robots at Dunbar High School because, he says, he "didn't have anything else to do. " Three years later, the 18-year-old senior has gotten so good at engineering robots, he's teaching Baltimore's business leaders how to use them. "He did a great job. Well, he did better than I expected he would do," Harrell said Sunday after Eliot Pearson, AOL's principal software engineer, finished operating a robot Harrell and two other Dunbar students built.
Advertisement
SPORTS
Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
EMMITSBURG - If you like your March Madness stories improbable, this is the team for you. The Mount St. Mary's Mountaineers are a rag-tag group of transfers and unsung recruits who, two years ago, watched their previous coach resign midway through an 8-21 season. Their current coach, Jamion Christian, is all of 31 years old with two years experience heading a program. They lost their first five games of the season and stood 3-9 when the calendar turned to 2014. They trailed by eight with less than a minute to go in the opening game of the Northeast Conference tournament.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2014
Now that "The Book of Mormon" has settled into Baltimore's Hippodrome , the folks behind Midweek Madness (OK, that's me) could not resist posting this droll parody of the show's opening number. Shalom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
OK, so the first thing you need to know about this Midweek Madness installment is that it isn't quite mad. But let's face it, when you think of Patricia Routledge, who turned 85 this week, you think of Hyacinth Bucket (it's pronounced "bouquet"), the fussy, snobby character she portrayed to hilarious effect on the 1990s Britcom "Keeping Up Appearances. " (Given how often it still airs on PBS stations over here, perhaps it could also be called "Keeping Up Ratings. ") One of the many brilliant things about Miss Routledge is her ability to imitate hideous singing as Hyacinth.  It takes a true singer to do that perfectly, and she is a true singer.
NEWS
February 12, 2014
As a citizen of Maryland, I oppose S.B. 629, a bill in the state Senate that, if enacted, would authorize a county or municipality to impose an annual surcharge for the registration of a motor vehicle. The legislation would provide for a surcharge up to $20 per year per vehicle and require that revenue from the surcharge be used for transportation development purposes. While the terminology used in S.B. 629 says "surcharge," this is really a tax since the intent is for the "surcharge" to apply every year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
For fellow sufferers of polar vortexes (vortices?) -- and this winter really is getting to be a terrible bore, don't you think? -- Midweek Madness provides a steamy version of "Baby It's Cold Outside" to help you keep warm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
So, you didn't win the big Mega Millions jackpot? Well, neither did your trusty Midweek Madness provider. Or all his colleagues at The Sun who were so sure that, by pooling our resources, we were going to be one-percenters. Well, time to get over it and listen to sage advice from the divine Judy Garland, whose 1937 recording seems all the more fitting for us poor losers today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
So many friends, so many gifts to buy. Such tsuris, this holiday business. But not to worry. Midweek Madness wants to make things easier for you by offering some unique gift suggestions, starting today with this recording, the ultimate prize for any music lover on your shopping list.  
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
Midweek Madness says "Happy Thanksgiving, pilgrims. " (That's '50s/'60s actress Barbara Nichols, in case you were wondering.)
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | November 21, 2013
Venus Theatre's latest production, the premiere of "731 Degraw-street, Brooklyn or Emily Dickinson's Sister," starts with a dramatic ending and goes backward and forward in time, opening with gunshots and a young man's dead body sprawled on the stage. The opening left the theater tensely silent as the audience seemed to lean toward the stage in anticipation of where the story would go. They had to wait, a bit long at times, as the plot progressed while four actors changed into different costumes behind stage, and those playing ensemble roles changed the staging to music with a funky beat.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.