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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2005
"Grab your Walkman, and make sure you bring extra duct tape. You'll need it to make sure that gigantic weight hanging off your side doesn't fall and crash to the ground, and blast the Huey Lewis." "Go for some Fruit Roll-Ups. Make sure to separate the cellophane from the equally toxic candied sheet. The cellophane's probably healthier to eat." "Cool off. Take a dip with some Snorks at your local pool. Snork it up, seriously." "Guys, put on your rainbow-striped Mork suspenders, and make sure the lady in your life wears shoulder pads.
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | March 18, 2008
DAVIDSON, N.C. -- All three swivel chairs are occupied and all three barbers are busy at work. "Doing what we do -- cutting hair and talking basketball," as Ron Raeford puts it. He's the owner and proprietor of Raeford's Barber Shop on Main Street. "They're about where they want to be right now," says Thomas Marsh, snipping away on the far end. "Yeah, they're jellin', " Raeford agrees. At 79 years old, it's Kenneth Norton's endorsement that carries the most weight. "Yes," he says, his words slow and soft, "I believe we're ready."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 31, 1995
Years back, "Mad Max" pretty much blew the genre of post-apocalyptic neo-techno-road western out of the water, and since then there's been nowhere to go but down. But who could have imagined "Tank Girl"? It's gone down so far it looks like there's no up to me.Derived from a raw, vulgar, protean British comic strip, it's been tamed and crushed by director Rachel Talalay (I know she's from Baltimore; the movie's still terrible) and a less than overwhelming production team. This is one of those films set in a teeming, swarming future that really has about seven people in it and all the backgrounds are crude paintings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2005
"Grab your Walkman, and make sure you bring extra duct tape. You'll need it to make sure that gigantic weight hanging off your side doesn't fall and crash to the ground, and blast the Huey Lewis." "Go for some Fruit Roll-Ups. Make sure to separate the cellophane from the equally toxic candied sheet. The cellophane's probably healthier to eat." "Cool off. Take a dip with some Snorks at your local pool. Snork it up, seriously." "Guys, put on your rainbow-striped Mork suspenders, and make sure the lady in your life wears shoulder pads.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | March 18, 2008
DAVIDSON, N.C. -- All three swivel chairs are occupied and all three barbers are busy at work. "Doing what we do -- cutting hair and talking basketball," as Ron Raeford puts it. He's the owner and proprietor of Raeford's Barber Shop on Main Street. "They're about where they want to be right now," says Thomas Marsh, snipping away on the far end. "Yeah, they're jellin', " Raeford agrees. At 79 years old, it's Kenneth Norton's endorsement that carries the most weight. "Yes," he says, his words slow and soft, "I believe we're ready."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 3, 2000
Dark science fiction is a tricky television genre. Last fall, I was mightily impressed by the mythology that Chris Carter ("The X-Files") created for a new Fox series titled "Harsh Realm." But the teen male viewers it takes to put sci-fi over the top weren't, and the series was canceled after only a few weeks. I say that as a warning, because I am absolutely dazzled by the universe and lead character that Academy Award-winner James Cameron ("Titanic") has created in the new Fox series "Dark Angel," which premieres tonight.
NEWS
December 2, 1995
Gen. Maxwell Thurman, 64, a retired Army general who led the 1989 invasion of Panama and was a principal architect of the all-volunteer Army, died yesterday at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington. He was diagnosed with leukemia in 1990.Called "Mad Max" and "Maxatollah" by colleagues for his aggressive style, General Thurman delayed his retirement at the request of the Bush administration so he could lead the effort to oust Gen. Manuel Noriega's regime.He was named commander of the U.S. Southern Command, based at Quarry Heights, Panama, in September 1989, with responsibility for forces in South and Central America.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1995
The most expensive epic of all time is here, and it's not a washout. It can swim! In fact, "Waterworld," which cost around $175 million to make, is good.Kevin Costner can finally put aside all the bad press about cost overruns and just be glad he didn't have to do an accent. He's an able, compelling hero as the Mariner, a scruffy loner with a very cool boat who is just trying to survive on an Earth that has been flooded by the melting of the polar ice caps.He's a Mad Max with gills, a "muto" who can breathe underwater.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff pTC | January 18, 1991
MAD MAX as Hamlet?Come on. The only person who would try something like that is Franco Zeffirelli, and that he has, with surprising result.It's all rather amazing. We've see this drama so many times, we know all the lines by heart (well, some of them), and still we are enrapt, transported, moved by the film, one that was done on locations in Scotland.Mel Gibson may be the weakest thing about the movie, but he isn't at all bad. He is better, say, than Clint Eastwood would have been in the same part.
NEWS
April 28, 1997
Peter Earle,71, an investigative reporter who helped uncover a scandal that brought down a British government and who revealed the "poison umbrella" murder of a Bulgarian dissident, died of cancer April 6 in London. His investigations into a call-girl ring grew into the Profumo scandal that brought down Prime Minister Harold Macmillan's government in 1962.Joey Faye,87, a burlesque and Broadway star who performed with stripper Gypsy Rose Lee and played the dancing green grapes in Fruit of the Loom commercials, died Saturday in Englewood, N.J.Bernard Vonnegut,82, a chemist known for his discovery of cloud-seeding techniques and his research into the nature of thunderstorms, died Friday in Albany, N.Y. Vonnegut, the older brother of writer Kurt Vonnegut Jr., discovered the power of silver iodide as a cloud-seeding agent in 1946.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 3, 2000
Dark science fiction is a tricky television genre. Last fall, I was mightily impressed by the mythology that Chris Carter ("The X-Files") created for a new Fox series titled "Harsh Realm." But the teen male viewers it takes to put sci-fi over the top weren't, and the series was canceled after only a few weeks. I say that as a warning, because I am absolutely dazzled by the universe and lead character that Academy Award-winner James Cameron ("Titanic") has created in the new Fox series "Dark Angel," which premieres tonight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 31, 1995
Years back, "Mad Max" pretty much blew the genre of post-apocalyptic neo-techno-road western out of the water, and since then there's been nowhere to go but down. But who could have imagined "Tank Girl"? It's gone down so far it looks like there's no up to me.Derived from a raw, vulgar, protean British comic strip, it's been tamed and crushed by director Rachel Talalay (I know she's from Baltimore; the movie's still terrible) and a less than overwhelming production team. This is one of those films set in a teeming, swarming future that really has about seven people in it and all the backgrounds are crude paintings.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,By the Evening Sun Staff | January 19, 1991
Movies It seems unlikely that anyone would cast Mel Gibson, below, as the lead in a new film version of ''Hamlet,'' but that's exactly what Franco Zeffirelli has done, and this is anything but stunt casting. Gibson, who first made it as ''Mad Max,'' is a respectable Hamlet. He isn't the best, but he does exceptionally well with the soliloquies. Glenn Close, as Hamlet's mother, Gertrude, is even more persuasive. You may know all the details, but the film makes them seem new. Violence. Rating: PG. *** The Ridge String Quartet, a celebrated young chamber music group, plays at 8:30 tonight in the Shriver Hall Concert Series at Johns Hopkins University's Homewood Campus.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
This weekend, the Pratt presents one of the most joyous surprises of recent feature-length cartoons: George Miller's "Happy Feet," in which two very different superstars play Mumbles the penguin. Frodo himself, Elijah Wood, provides the character's voice. More important, tap genius Savion Glover provides the character's moves as dancer and choreographer. You see, in an emperor penguin society that values vocalizing, little Mumbles can't carry a tune. But the lad can dance, and he eventually finds five new buddies who declare him their "Big Guy."
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