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By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,Tribune newspapers | January 1, 2010
When he takes on a role, Johnny Depp often paints a watercolor portrait of the still-forming character to help find his face and personality. After putting the finishing touches on his painting for "Alice in Wonderland," Depp looked down at the Mad Hatter staring back at him from the canvas and giggled. "I was thinking," the actor said, " 'Oh, my God, this one will get me fired!' " It's hard to imagine any pink slips in the future for Depp, who, it could be argued, reigns as the biggest movie star in the world at the moment.
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NEWS
By Allison Eatough | April 2, 2014
With whiskey barrel chairs, rows of colored glass bottles and mismatched antique teacups reminiscent of a Mad Hatter tea party, Twisted Teahouse is not your traditional teahouse. The Savage Mill business is half tea boutique, half consignment shop and host to tea parties both on and off site.   Angela Vogel, a mother of two and home day care provider, opened Twisted Teahouse in December after years of collecting antique teacups and hosting English-style tea parties in her Severn home.
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NEWS
By KATHERYN G. McGILL | October 9, 1991
The center of the market was dominated by a large red, white and blue canopy. Still seeking the White Rabbit, Alice had left Tweedledum and Tweedledee far behind, up the hill, exhausted in fits of glee after their poem.As she approached the market, she could make out hundreds of people milling around amidst muffled noises. A row of traffic cones stood in front of the canopy, on either side of a large gate. A guardsman, dressed in camouflage, paced back and forth. As Alice approached, he stepped forward.
NEWS
February 22, 2011
Each new morning paper and evening newscast describes congressional activity that more and more resembles the Mad Hatter's Tea Party. At the same time the mantra is "jobs," they propose to cut thousands and thousands of government jobs, especially if they relate to such nefarious liberal causes as the environment, education and social services, all of which relate to the natural resources and the grassroots people who have added the word "great" to...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 28, 2005
Towson Spring Festival Four stages of live music, tables upon tables of handmade crafts, an array of delectable foods, an antique-car show, numerous inflatable rides and various games -- where to begin at the Towsontown Fine Arts and Crafts Spring Festival? The annual festival takes place Saturday and Sunday throughout downtown Towson. Hours are extended this year, and the layout of the festival grounds has changed a bit. Visitors are encouraged to pick up a free program from any of the show vendors upon entering the festival.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1998
Tre Dennis wanted to make himself really small.So, the 5-year-old drank a magic potion from an imaginary cup and followed the rabbit down the hole and into Wonderland.If this sounds familiar, it should -- Tre and several of his friends were among the dozens of youngsters who mingled with "Alice in Wonderland" characters at the Annapolis library recently to launch Anne Arundel County's annual summer reading program.The program -- "Thrills and Chills at the Library" -- runs until July 31. Librarians have added a new twist this year -- a prize.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | October 31, 1993
Visitors to last summer's Harford County Seafood Festival may recall meeting the Mad Hatter, a character from the Lewis Carroll children's story who mingled with the crowds and invited them into the world of Alice in Wonderland.The Mad Hatter was a costumed Bel Air High School sophomore named Carrie Siegel.The 15-year-old was among the young actors who came to the festival to promote a production of the play by Theatreworks . . . Live!, a nonprofit theater company her parents helped start early this year.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | April 23, 1993
A novel is a novel. A play is a play. And neither automatically becomes a successful version of the other.That's one lesson to be learned from the Moonlight Trouper's presentation of "Alice In Wonderland," which is showing at Anne Arundel Community College's Pascal Center this weekend.Indeed, a great deal of this script adapted for the stage by Eve Le Galliene and Florida Friebus comes directly from Lewis Carroll himself, and therein lies the problem. With no handcrafted dramatic structure to buttress them, the enchanting monologues and conversations of the novel become talky and just plain uneventful when transported to the stage.
NEWS
By Allison Eatough | April 2, 2014
With whiskey barrel chairs, rows of colored glass bottles and mismatched antique teacups reminiscent of a Mad Hatter tea party, Twisted Teahouse is not your traditional teahouse. The Savage Mill business is half tea boutique, half consignment shop and host to tea parties both on and off site.   Angela Vogel, a mother of two and home day care provider, opened Twisted Teahouse in December after years of collecting antique teacups and hosting English-style tea parties in her Severn home.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
The show this month at the Resurgam Gallery looks like a shoe store run by the Mad Hatter -- or by a slightly crazed cobbler inspired by Dada masters Man Ray and Marcel Duchamp.After more than a decade, Ruth Pettus has gotten tired of being pointed out as the "men-in-suits painter."So for her "A History in the Life of a Shoe, Part II,"' she's installed about 75 examples of artful footwear in the gallery at 910 South Charles St., about three gulps down from the New World Coffee Shop.They're shoes she's deconstructed, reconstructed, un-constructed, un-tongued, unlaced, re-laced, de-soled, unsold, re-souled, turned-inside-out, sliced, diced, bent, broken and battered, and some she's just preserved as purely unique specimens of the shoemaker's craft.
FEATURES
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,Tribune newspapers | January 1, 2010
When he takes on a role, Johnny Depp often paints a watercolor portrait of the still-forming character to help find his face and personality. After putting the finishing touches on his painting for "Alice in Wonderland," Depp looked down at the Mad Hatter staring back at him from the canvas and giggled. "I was thinking," the actor said, " 'Oh, my God, this one will get me fired!' " It's hard to imagine any pink slips in the future for Depp, who, it could be argued, reigns as the biggest movie star in the world at the moment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 28, 2005
Towson Spring Festival Four stages of live music, tables upon tables of handmade crafts, an array of delectable foods, an antique-car show, numerous inflatable rides and various games -- where to begin at the Towsontown Fine Arts and Crafts Spring Festival? The annual festival takes place Saturday and Sunday throughout downtown Towson. Hours are extended this year, and the layout of the festival grounds has changed a bit. Visitors are encouraged to pick up a free program from any of the show vendors upon entering the festival.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 2001
IF HOLLYWOOD presented Oscars for best performance by a movie fan, Henry and Ingrid Petzold of Severna Park would have a mantel-full of statuettes. Their movie-going motto might be: "If they put it on the silver screen, we will come." Everything from big budget productions to little independents to foreign films with captions, they don't miss a single show. Mrs. Petzold can't resist a movie's emotional appeal, having seen one of her all-time favorites, the Robert Redford-Meryl Streep "Out of Africa," more than a dozen times.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | July 5, 1998
Tre Dennis wanted to make himself really small.So, the 5-year-old drank a magic potion from an imaginary cup and followed the rabbit down the hole and into Wonderland.If this sounds familiar, it should -- Tre and several of his friends were among the dozens of youngsters who mingled with "Alice in Wonderland" characters at the Annapolis library recently to launch Anne Arundel County's annual summer reading program.The program -- "Thrills and Chills at the Library" -- runs until July 31. Librarians have added a new twist this year -- a prize.
NEWS
By Jonathan Kirsch | January 25, 1998
STRANGE as it may seem, America owes Theodore J. Kaczynski a debt of gratitude. By pleading guilty to murder charges, the Unabomber has spared us all the sorry spectacle of a murder trial in which the defendant is opined to be a paranoid schizophrenic and at the same time competent to face a jury.The Kaczynski trial was shaping up as yet another travesty of justice, no less a media circus than the criminal prosecution of O. J. Simpson and, even more to the point, the Long Island Rail Road shooter, Colin Ferguson.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
The show this month at the Resurgam Gallery looks like a shoe store run by the Mad Hatter -- or by a slightly crazed cobbler inspired by Dada masters Man Ray and Marcel Duchamp.After more than a decade, Ruth Pettus has gotten tired of being pointed out as the "men-in-suits painter."So for her "A History in the Life of a Shoe, Part II,"' she's installed about 75 examples of artful footwear in the gallery at 910 South Charles St., about three gulps down from the New World Coffee Shop.They're shoes she's deconstructed, reconstructed, un-constructed, un-tongued, unlaced, re-laced, de-soled, unsold, re-souled, turned-inside-out, sliced, diced, bent, broken and battered, and some she's just preserved as purely unique specimens of the shoemaker's craft.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 2001
IF HOLLYWOOD presented Oscars for best performance by a movie fan, Henry and Ingrid Petzold of Severna Park would have a mantel-full of statuettes. Their movie-going motto might be: "If they put it on the silver screen, we will come." Everything from big budget productions to little independents to foreign films with captions, they don't miss a single show. Mrs. Petzold can't resist a movie's emotional appeal, having seen one of her all-time favorites, the Robert Redford-Meryl Streep "Out of Africa," more than a dozen times.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | October 6, 1994
Charles Street at dusk:Cross dressers in midriff tops dance to a Latin beat, their heels clicking on the cobblestones. Senior citizens, a block away, order hot dogs from a makeshift barbecue. And in the C. Grimaldis Gallery, art students in rumpled sweat shirts and jeans gaze at $10,000 paintings and sip free Sauvignon Blanc.This can mean only one thing: It's First Thursday in Baltimore.For the last 10 years, these quirky collisions of urban life have defined the monthly happy hour-cum-art openings along Charles Street.
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