Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMad
IN THE NEWS

Mad

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 20, 2010
You ask the question in your editorial "Muddled tea leaves" (May 20): "Voters are mad at incumbents, but how will it translate to Maryland?" Answer; almost zero influence because the Maryland voters are not mad as hell. With unemployment statistics more than 2 percent below the national 9.9 percent average, the solid control by the Democratic Party in all branches of state and most local governments, and the inept Republican/independent parties unable to present candidates that can light a fire under the electorate with solid programs to challenge the incumbents, there will be no Massachusetts/Virginia/New Jersey/Pennsylvania miracle in Maryland come November 2010.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
I swear this episode was brought to us by Bad Idea Jeans. On to the show ... Back at Coyopa's camp after last week's Tribal Council, Josh explains to Baylor that he voted for her because he really wants to be in an alliance with her, but didn't want the rest of the guys to know. That makes no sense. Didn't you just, in fact, draw Baylor to their attention and prove that you have no problem with going against the rest of the group. Bad idea! At Hunahpu (which is the most unnatural thing to spell.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | May 29, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- "Negative, negative, negative," was all Gov. William Donald Schaefer could say about The Sun's coverage last week of his appointment of Capt. Larry Tolliver, his chief bodyguard, as the new superintendent of State Police.So, when The Evening Sun asked its readers the very next day to register their opinion on the appointment by telephone, Mr. Schaefer was outraged. He angrily complained the question was skewed to produce a vote against his appointee.Mr. Schaefer's press secretary, Frank Traynor, apparently took the governor's remarks as a cue and did what he could to skew the clearly unscientific poll in the captain's favor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A jolting cupful of Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" for your Midweek Madness break. I especially like the bits of choreography, as well as what I gather is a Finnish folk song that these guys from the Fabulous Backstrom Brothers Show toss into the mix. (Thanks to conductor Lee Mills, whose FB post of this clip gave me something to steal for this week's post.)
NEWS
August 25, 1997
A SCARY MAN named Carl Drega, who was 67 and had feuded violently with town officials for decades in northern New Hampshire near the Vermont and Quebec borders, finally popped last Tuesday.When troopers Scott Phillips and Leslie Lord stopped Drega's truck for a violation, it was Drega who had an assault rifle, Drega who wore a bulletproof vest. He assassinated them.He took their cruiser, hunting down a hit list. He executed Vickie Bunnell, a lawyer and part-time judge in Colebrook who had offended him, and murdered Dennis Joos, the town newspaper editor, who tried to intervene.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 24, 2002
"What, me sell out?" Apparently so. Alfred E. Neuman, the gap-toothed mascot of Mad magazine, has officially joined the Establishment. Dressed in a preppy blue polo shirt, he can now be found on the cover of a Lands' End catalog, hawking chinos, button-down Oxford shirts and tasseled loafers. He also had his teeth fixed for a new "Got milk?" campaign. And PepsiCo plans to plaster his lopsided mug on bottles of its SoBe drinks. The list goes on. Although Mad's founder, the late William Gaines, once vowed to teach kids not to believe in ads, his cartoon protege has clearly chosen another path.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | July 12, 1999
SAMUEL PENNINGTON publishes Maine Antique Digest, watchguards the antiques market, collects (historical bronze sculptures), and now and then catches public television's current hit, "Antiques Roadshow." Now and then his eyes, too, widen.May's issue of M.A.D., as the trade calls it, had 412 tabloid-size pages; 30,000-some subscribers rate M.A.D. without equal for Americana.Pennington, who founded M.A.D. in 1973, is from Baltimore (Calvert School, Johns Hopkins '52). Waldoboro, Me., offered lower costs, perhaps more action (recently a July 17, 1776, printing of the Declaration of Independence turned up in a Dumpster; clouded provenance, but worth at least $100,000)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 24, 1999
One of the more complicated end-of-the-television-season rituals is saying goodbye to one-time hit series that have overstayed their welcome.In recent years, that list has included "Murphy Brown" and "Roseanne." Tonight, in that category comes "Mad About You" with Helen Hunt and Paul Reiser in a one-hour finale titled "The Final Frontier."The episode opens with Paul (Reiser) and Jamie (Hunt) Buchman in bed introducing a clip reel of some of their "favorite moments from the last seven years."
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 6, 1997
With the sun spreading its vast Technicolor glow along York Road, and with thousands streaming into the Towsontown Festival, and with the music of their laughter filling the weekend air, this kid was spotted outside the Towson Library. Immediately, he made you want to cancel spring and issue a factory recall for winter.He was maybe 14 years old and wore a black T-shirt and a smirk. The T-shirt said "Nazi Punk." The smirk said: I am a geek who thinks this is cool, and I have no idea what I am doing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Schlesinger and By Judith Schlesinger,Special to the Sun | February 10, 2002
Mad in America: Bad Science, Bad Medicine, and the Enduring Mistreatment of The Mentally Ill, by Robert Whitaker. Perseus Publishing. 334 pages. $27. Every problem in life can be solved with a pill. We learn this from TV ads where cartoon blobs are energized by Zoloft, snarling premenstrual women are beatified by Serafem and a lifetime of shyness is cured (poof!) by Paxil. Each day, more of us fall into a warm pharmaceutical embrace, seduced by blitzkrieg marketing to believe that psychiatry is always progressive and benign, its remedies always safe and effective.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Your Midweek Madness provider is on vacation for a couple of weeks, but understands your need for periodic relief from the dreariness of life, hence this Beethoven-ized blast of a well-known march tune played by the ever so clever Dudley Moore.
NEWS
Wesley Case, Justin George, Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Does the EDM scene have a drug problem? The question, which has followed the increasingly mainstream electronic dance music genre for years, is being raised again in the wake of the deaths of two males, ages 20 and 17, who attended an all-day EDM show last weekend in Columbia. Nineteen other people were sent to hospitals from Friday's Mad Decent Block Party at Merriweather Post Pavilion, which featured artists such as Diplo, Flux Pavilion and Dillon Francis. The concerns come as Baltimore prepares for the first-ever Moonrise Festival, which will take place Saturday and Sunday at Pimlico Race Course and feature genre heavyweights Kaskade and Bassnectar.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A 17-year-old Woodbridge, Va., boy died Sunday evening of an apparent overdose, the second drug fatality following a Merriweather Post Pavilion concert on Friday, Howard County police said. The teen, whom police did not identify at the request of his family, was one of 20 hospitalized after the "Mad Decent Block Party" music festival at the Columbia venue. Authorities identified the man who died Saturday as Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C. Police do not believe the two knew each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Your Midweek Madness supplier confesses ignorance of Shakira. Please forgive. The first awareness of this global sensation came a couple days ago with the accidental discovery of a cover made of one of Shakira's mega-hits, "Hips Don't Lie," sung by an a cappella ensemble of Oxford University students called Out of the Blue. (They've been raising money to support a children's hospice with downloads of the performance .) The infectious Out of the Blue video has gone viral, needless to say, so it is posted here only for the benefit of those few who remain pitifully unaware of Shakira's "Hips Don't Lie" or a bunch of "Glee"-worthy, wiggling warblers from a posh British school.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
Sam Farrell was not necessarily looking for a coaching job when she was hired in January to lead the South River girls lacrosse team, just weeks after former Seahawks coach  Kim McNemar stepped down. Farrell, a Severna Park graduate who played at Florida, said Thursday she wasn't necessarily looking for her most recent opportunity, either. After one season coaching South River, Farrell decided this week to join San Diego-based Mad Dog Lacrosse as a camp director and coach.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
It was three years ago -- it only seems like 13 -- in June that I launched Midweek Madness, a good enough excuse to offer an encore of the inaugural posting and the perfect way to celebrate the first full week of summer. Here is the fab Mari Lynn, self-proclaimed coloratura soprano and musicologist, veering off her usual heilige kunst to destroy, I mean, deliver Gershwin's "Summertime. " If you can't endure all of it, don't miss the very end of the performance.
NEWS
July 22, 1993
President Clinton, on being accused of weakness for his compromise policy on gays in the military, responded, "I am the first president who ever took on this issue. It may be a sign of madness, sir, but it is not a sign of weakness." We don't think the president has gone mad, but we wonder about some of his critics.The fact is this compromise moves homosexual rights in the military quite far along. This was achieved without provoking bitter acceptance from the Joint Chief of Staffs, much less opposition.
NEWS
By Elsbeth L. Bothe and Elsbeth L. Bothe,special to the sun | August 31, 1997
"The Mad, the Bad and the Innocent," by Barbara R. Kirwin, Little, Brown & Company, 306 pages. $23.95.Soldiers and hangmen can be sane killers. There is something mentally the matter with virtually anyone else who deliberately brings about the death of another human being. Ordinary people eschew killing even as they are vicariously infatuated with murderers. The more killings are multiple, senseless and bizarre, the more likely the mind-set of those accused of committing them will become an issue in the courtroom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Just when you thought you had endured the last of Midweek Madness, it's back. And, for no evident reason, it has decided to foist something truly mad on you -- "Dot's Nice, Donna Fight," sung by two great artists, Rosemary Clooney and Marlene Dietrich in the early 1950s. I heard it and I still don't believe it. But the harpsichord is such a classy touch, no?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karmen Fox and For The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
That's one small two-step for SC&P, and one giant leap for Don's humility. So, who was expecting that? Not the death. I was suspecting someone would be killed off with Ted's death wish and the looming Mets pennant. And not Roger swooping in to save Don and the agency. We've been rooting for an underdog all season - we just didn't know it was Roger. And not Sally's amped up cynicism and sass, either. That's just business as usual. I mean Bert's dance from beyond the grave. Say what you will about the episode's ending - bizarre and out of place, or comical and uplifting (Twitter seemed pretty evenly divided)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.