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By TIMMY SAMUEL and TIMMY SAMUEL,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 26, 2006
Apple Computer Inc. CEO Steve Jobs traditionally uses the annual Macworld Conference & Expo to introduce his company's latest and greatest hardware and software - and this year was no exception. Jobs' big news at the show, held Jan. 9-13 at San Francisco's Moscone Center, was that Apple's previously announced move to Intel processors would be much sooner than expected. He said the first Macintosh computers using the processor, the iMac and MacBook Pro, will be available in January and February, respectively - a full six months ahead of schedule.
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BUSINESS
By Jim Rossman and Jim Rossman,The Dallas Morning News | January 4, 2007
DALLAS -- A new year can mean many things, but to Macintosh enthusiasts, it means one very special thing - Macworld. The yearly gathering of Macintosh users and vendors and a visit from Apple chief executive Steve Jobs are just around the corner. A Steve Jobs Macworld keynote address is the one time during the year when we can count on Apple Computer Inc. unveiling new products. Apple has a reputation of keeping new product releases close to the vest. This only serves as kindling to the rumor-fires that start around the first of December.
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BUSINESS
By Jim Rossman and Jim Rossman,The Dallas Morning News | January 4, 2007
DALLAS -- A new year can mean many things, but to Macintosh enthusiasts, it means one very special thing - Macworld. The yearly gathering of Macintosh users and vendors and a visit from Apple chief executive Steve Jobs are just around the corner. A Steve Jobs Macworld keynote address is the one time during the year when we can count on Apple Computer Inc. unveiling new products. Apple has a reputation of keeping new product releases close to the vest. This only serves as kindling to the rumor-fires that start around the first of December.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIMMY SAMUEL and TIMMY SAMUEL,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 26, 2006
Apple Computer Inc. CEO Steve Jobs traditionally uses the annual Macworld Conference & Expo to introduce his company's latest and greatest hardware and software - and this year was no exception. Jobs' big news at the show, held Jan. 9-13 at San Francisco's Moscone Center, was that Apple's previously announced move to Intel processors would be much sooner than expected. He said the first Macintosh computers using the processor, the iMac and MacBook Pro, will be available in January and February, respectively - a full six months ahead of schedule.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- For Mac users and Mac developers, the twice-yearly Macworld conference and convention is a celebration -- a preview of what's going to keep the Mac different and a reminder that most of those differences are good ones.But in a year such as this, with Apple Computers struggling, Macworld takes on a different cast.Think of it as a public visit to the doctor, a complete physical examination that offers the chance to learn what this year's illness means for the Mac's future.L The prognosis from last week's show in San Francisco: mixed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1998
The crushing weight of Windows' dominance in the computer universe has made it ever more difficult to find news and discussion about the Apple Macintosh. If you know where to look, however, you can find an abundance of information on the Mac.The most obvious place to get Mac news is from magazines, either the electronic variety on the Web or old-fashioned ink-on-paper ones.The two best-known Mac magazines, MacWorld and MacUser, merged late last year under the banner of MacWorld (www.macworld.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2002
In the Region Internet security company SafeNet posts a profit SafeNet Inc., a White Marsh developer of Internet security software, posted a profit for the third quarter yesterday and said its revenue was more than double that of a year ago. Net income was $993,000, or 12 cents per diluted share, in the quarter that ended Sept. 30. That compares with a net loss of $717,000, or 10 cents a share, in the corresponding quarter of last year. SafeNet's adjusted net income in the quarter, which does not include losses from discontinued operations and other expenses, was $830,000, or 10 cents per diluted share.
FEATURES
By John Flinn and John Flinn,San Francisco Examiner | August 23, 1994
The information superhighway is veering toward Hollywood and Las Vegas, but a new survey says consumers would rather it go to their local civic center.The survey, released last week by San Francisco-based Macworld magazine, suggests that users don't really want the video-on-demand, interactive video games or home gambling being touted as prime uses of the superhighway.Instead, they want to be able to vote electronically, search reference books and educate themselves."Our findings suggest that commercial applications for the information superhighway are quickly diverging from the public's needs and interests," says Macworld editor-in-chief Adrian Mello.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
Sex and power. It's an irresistible combination, and Apple CEO Steve Jobs knows it. When Jobs introduced the PowerBook G4 at January's MacWorld Expo in San Francisco, he said Apple's goal was to combine the sex appeal of the Sony Vaio (a Windows-based notebook computer) with the power of a Mac desktop computer. Although Jobs tends to exaggerate at these semi-annual extravaganzas, the newest PowerBook is the real thing. Here we have a laptop Mac powered by a 400 or 500 MHz G4 chip, featuring a 15.2-inch-wide screen, a DVD-ROM drive, 128 megabytes of memory and an advertised battery life of five hours - all encased in an inch-thick, 5.3-pound titanium shell.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 9, 1993
BOSTON -- Apple Computer Inc.'s Newton got off to a torrid, if somewhat controversial, start last week when some buyers at the Macworld Expo show complained they had been gouged by profit-hungry retailers.The personal digital assistant was the show's hottest item, with one booth selling its allotment of a couple hundred Newtons before the show opened. Those units were sold to exhibitors, on the floor to prepare their booths, who lined up four deep and jostled one another to wave credit cards at sales clerks.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2002
In the Region Internet security company SafeNet posts a profit SafeNet Inc., a White Marsh developer of Internet security software, posted a profit for the third quarter yesterday and said its revenue was more than double that of a year ago. Net income was $993,000, or 12 cents per diluted share, in the quarter that ended Sept. 30. That compares with a net loss of $717,000, or 10 cents a share, in the corresponding quarter of last year. SafeNet's adjusted net income in the quarter, which does not include losses from discontinued operations and other expenses, was $830,000, or 10 cents per diluted share.
BUSINESS
By David Zeiler and David Zeiler,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
NEW YORK - Once again, Steve Jobs' keynote address at the Macworld Conference and Expo managed to surprise the semiannual gathering of Macintosh enthusiasts. But this time the surprise was the lack of one. Unlike past expos, when the Apple chief executive introduced the iMac and the Cube, Jobs announced no changes yesterday to Apple's notebook line of the PowerBook G4 or the white iBook, both introduced earlier this year. Apple's desktop line of G4 Power Macs got the most attention, with a new silver enclosure, faster processors and the SuperDrive - which is capable of writing to both DVDs and rewritable CDs - standard in both midrange and the high-end models.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
Sex and power. It's an irresistible combination, and Apple CEO Steve Jobs knows it. When Jobs introduced the PowerBook G4 at January's MacWorld Expo in San Francisco, he said Apple's goal was to combine the sex appeal of the Sony Vaio (a Windows-based notebook computer) with the power of a Mac desktop computer. Although Jobs tends to exaggerate at these semi-annual extravaganzas, the newest PowerBook is the real thing. Here we have a laptop Mac powered by a 400 or 500 MHz G4 chip, featuring a 15.2-inch-wide screen, a DVD-ROM drive, 128 megabytes of memory and an advertised battery life of five hours - all encased in an inch-thick, 5.3-pound titanium shell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1998
The crushing weight of Windows' dominance in the computer universe has made it ever more difficult to find news and discussion about the Apple Macintosh. If you know where to look, however, you can find an abundance of information on the Mac.The most obvious place to get Mac news is from magazines, either the electronic variety on the Web or old-fashioned ink-on-paper ones.The two best-known Mac magazines, MacWorld and MacUser, merged late last year under the banner of MacWorld (www.macworld.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 12, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO -- For Mac users and Mac developers, the twice-yearly Macworld conference and convention is a celebration -- a preview of what's going to keep the Mac different and a reminder that most of those differences are good ones.But in a year such as this, with Apple Computers struggling, Macworld takes on a different cast.Think of it as a public visit to the doctor, a complete physical examination that offers the chance to learn what this year's illness means for the Mac's future.L The prognosis from last week's show in San Francisco: mixed.
FEATURES
By John Flinn and John Flinn,San Francisco Examiner | August 23, 1994
The information superhighway is veering toward Hollywood and Las Vegas, but a new survey says consumers would rather it go to their local civic center.The survey, released last week by San Francisco-based Macworld magazine, suggests that users don't really want the video-on-demand, interactive video games or home gambling being touted as prime uses of the superhighway.Instead, they want to be able to vote electronically, search reference books and educate themselves."Our findings suggest that commercial applications for the information superhighway are quickly diverging from the public's needs and interests," says Macworld editor-in-chief Adrian Mello.
BUSINESS
By David Zeiler and David Zeiler,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
NEW YORK - Once again, Steve Jobs' keynote address at the Macworld Conference and Expo managed to surprise the semiannual gathering of Macintosh enthusiasts. But this time the surprise was the lack of one. Unlike past expos, when the Apple chief executive introduced the iMac and the Cube, Jobs announced no changes yesterday to Apple's notebook line of the PowerBook G4 or the white iBook, both introduced earlier this year. Apple's desktop line of G4 Power Macs got the most attention, with a new silver enclosure, faster processors and the SuperDrive - which is capable of writing to both DVDs and rewritable CDs - standard in both midrange and the high-end models.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julio Ojeda-Zapata and Julio Ojeda-Zapata,Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 26, 1999
The iMac, Apple Computer's hot-selling desktop Macintosh for consumers, now has a portable counterpart nicknamed "iMac to go."Apple has unveiled its long-awaited consumer laptop, dubbed iBook, which combines iMac-like color schemes such as "blueberry" and "tangerine" with innovative features such as wireless-networking capabilities.The $1,599 iBook, due for release in September, completes Apple's plan to create desktop and laptop computers for consumers and professionals. The iMac fills the mainstream-desktop category while the Power Macintosh G3 and PowerBook G3 laptop are higher-priced products aimed at professionals.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 9, 1993
BOSTON -- Apple Computer Inc.'s Newton got off to a torrid, if somewhat controversial, start last week when some buyers at the Macworld Expo show complained they had been gouged by profit-hungry retailers.The personal digital assistant was the show's hottest item, with one booth selling its allotment of a couple hundred Newtons before the show opened. Those units were sold to exhibitors, on the floor to prepare their booths, who lined up four deep and jostled one another to wave credit cards at sales clerks.
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