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Macular Degeneration

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NEWS
By Barbara Chuck and Barbara Chuck,Los Angeles Times | August 1, 1999
If you're older than 50, or if someone close to you is, you may want to learn more about macular degeneration. It's an eye disease that accounts for about 20 percent of vision impairment in people older than 75. There are two types of macular degeneration, in which the macula -- the part of the eye that controls central, detailed vision -- becomes damaged:Dry. The most common form of this disease is difficult to detect in its early stages because changes in vision often are too subtle to notice.
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SPORTS
August 22, 2014
I've been wanting to write a thank-you note to the Veterans Health Administration. My father is a veteran and has macular degeneration he has been treated at the VA for over five years. Without all the care, he would be blind by now. So my blue-eyed dad still can drive and take care of his lawn and flowers and he also volunteers at the VA and drives other veterans to their doctors appointments. With all the negative talk about the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, I believe there are millions out there who are thanking the VA for the care that they receive.
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NEWS
By Judy Foreman | October 13, 2006
What's the best treatment for macular degeneration? The short answer is a new drug called Lucentis, approved by the Food and Drug Administration in June, although the drug has side effects, is extremely expensive, and is useful for only the rarer form of the disease. Macular degeneration and its new treatments were the focus of five separate articles in last week's New England Journal of Medicine. There are two kinds of macular degeneration - a disease of the retina that affects more than 9 million Americans and is a leading cause of blindness in people older than 55. In the "dry" form, which 90 percent of patients have, there is a loss of the light-sensing cells in the retina and the cells that nourish them.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Billionaire Texas oilman T. Boone Pickens has vision. It's 20/40. And the 85-year-old, who suffers from macular degeneration, wants to thank Johns Hopkins' Wilmer Eye Institute with a $20 million gift, among the largest ever for the program. Pickens, the outspoken founder of Mesa Petroleum, known for his conservative politics and support of alternative energy, has also given millions to hospitals around the nation. Wilmer has already received about $8 million from him and has named its five-story atrium for Pickens.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
Suddenly, a perfectly straight telephone pole appears crooked. The yellow line down the middle of the road turns wavy. A soft, blurry spot appears in the middle of a friend's face. This is how age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in America, often manifests itself before widening its swath through a person's vision. For its victims, life is never the same. "I did all my own work around the house, carpentry, plumbing, electrical - I miss that," said Arnold Rasnake, 82, a retired welder from Rosedale who noticed his first symptoms last April.
FEATURES
By Richard Saltus and Richard Saltus,BOSTON GLOBE | October 14, 1997
In yesterday's Today section, the location of the headquarters of The Foundation Fighting Blindness was misidentified. The foundation is in Hunt Valley.The Sun regrets the error.For the 6 million older Americans whose vision is being threatened or destroyed by a disease called macular degeneration, and for the doctors who have long been frustrated in their efforts to treat it, last month brought a rare dose of good news.Researchers from the National Cancer Institute in Frederick and three other institutions reported in the journal Science that they had found a cluster of genetic mutations that appear to cause about one-sixth of all age-related macular degeneration, or AMD. The mutations all affect the same gene, which the researchers were able to pinpoint.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff | January 17, 2000
Macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness in the elderly, appears to be yielding to new laser treatments that seal off destructive blood vessels behind the retina. Although doctors caution that the treatments do not offer a cure, they say the therapies have in many cases arrested the downward course of a disease that ordinarily robs people of their sight. Next month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is expected to approve a drug, verteporfin, that is used in concert with a low-powered laser.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2003
ANAHEIM, Calif. - An experimental drug can slow the loss of vision caused by a maddening eye disease that is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly, researchers have found. But in a large trial, the drug did not meaningfully improve vision, they said. That contradicts previously reported results that had sent patients flocking to eye doctors for what they thought might be a miracle cure. The drug, called Macugen, is intended to treat the wet form of age-related macular degeneration, a disease that can rob people of the ability to read, drive, recognize faces or watch television.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2000
If you think Internet surfing is a sport dominated by the young, check again. People older than 50 make up the fastest-growing group of Internet users, says the American Association of Retired Persons, whose surveys show that millions of older adults have computers and use them regularly. As cyber-seniors have increased in numbers, so have the number of Web sites and electronic newsletters featuring information on aging. These days, computer-savvy older adults have the latest information on everything from health issues and travel to finances and entertainment as close as their keyboards.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | August 2, 2007
I cannot take statin-type drugs. Is there a natural way to get triglycerides down? Triglycerides have just been shown to increase the risk of heart attacks (Journal of the American Medical Association, July 18). Fish oil is a natural way to lower this risk factor for heart disease. I have been fascinated with letters from people reporting that Lipitor weakened their muscles. I believe Lipitor triggered my ALS. Until last month, my doctors wouldn't listen to me, but then a report from the World Health Organization showed a link.
FEATURES
By Derek Nnuro | November 29, 2007
With baby boomers approaching retirement, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a coming epidemic that will affect millions of Americans, according to the National Institutes of Health. Based on published data, an estimated 8 million Americans ages 55 and older are at high risk to develop the disease, which causes blindness. Until recently, AMD was a poorly understood disease with little progress in research. Major breakthroughs have been made in understanding the disease, but there is more that needs to be done, says Dr. Morton F. Goldberg, chairman of the National Neurovision Research Institute of the Foundation Fighting Blindness in Owings Mills and former director of the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | August 2, 2007
I cannot take statin-type drugs. Is there a natural way to get triglycerides down? Triglycerides have just been shown to increase the risk of heart attacks (Journal of the American Medical Association, July 18). Fish oil is a natural way to lower this risk factor for heart disease. I have been fascinated with letters from people reporting that Lipitor weakened their muscles. I believe Lipitor triggered my ALS. Until last month, my doctors wouldn't listen to me, but then a report from the World Health Organization showed a link.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
The Wilmer Eye Institute, considered one of the world's top eye research and clinical facilities, is expanding with a $100 million building across the street from its landmark location at Johns Hopkins Hospital in East Baltimore. Construction will start today on a six-story research and clinical center that will allow the 83-year-old institute to boost research of macular degeneration and meet an aging population's growing demand for eye surgeries. "In terms of our surgery, we are in a situation where basically we have to turn people away now," said Dr. Peter J. McDonnell, director of the Wilmer Eye Institute.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | October 13, 2006
What's the best treatment for macular degeneration? The short answer is a new drug called Lucentis, approved by the Food and Drug Administration in June, although the drug has side effects, is extremely expensive, and is useful for only the rarer form of the disease. Macular degeneration and its new treatments were the focus of five separate articles in last week's New England Journal of Medicine. There are two kinds of macular degeneration - a disease of the retina that affects more than 9 million Americans and is a leading cause of blindness in people older than 55. In the "dry" form, which 90 percent of patients have, there is a loss of the light-sensing cells in the retina and the cells that nourish them.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
Suddenly, a perfectly straight telephone pole appears crooked. The yellow line down the middle of the road turns wavy. A soft, blurry spot appears in the middle of a friend's face. This is how age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in America, often manifests itself before widening its swath through a person's vision. For its victims, life is never the same. "I did all my own work around the house, carpentry, plumbing, electrical - I miss that," said Arnold Rasnake, 82, a retired welder from Rosedale who noticed his first symptoms last April.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 2003
ANAHEIM, Calif. - An experimental drug can slow the loss of vision caused by a maddening eye disease that is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly, researchers have found. But in a large trial, the drug did not meaningfully improve vision, they said. That contradicts previously reported results that had sent patients flocking to eye doctors for what they thought might be a miracle cure. The drug, called Macugen, is intended to treat the wet form of age-related macular degeneration, a disease that can rob people of the ability to read, drive, recognize faces or watch television.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | January 14, 1997
An eye doctor says my mother has "low vision" caused by macular degeneration, and there's nothing more doctors can do for her. What can she do for herself?While the doctor may be correct that no medical treatment or surgery can restore your mother's vision, much can be done to enhance the sight she has and quality of life.Macular degeneration (a breakdown of nerve cells in the center of the retina responsible for central vision and seeing fine detail), has impaired your mother's ability to see anything she looks at directly.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1999
Dr. Bert M. Glaser, the well-known retina surgeon, said yesterday that he has reached a settlement with Pioneer EyeCare, a company he founded but left in June in an acrimonious split with the company's management.The settlement allows Glaser to resume his practice in Towson, and he said he is doing that this week, with a new emphasis on treating macular degeneration.A judge ruled in August that the terms of Glaser's contract with Pioneer prevented him from practicing within 15 miles of his former Pioneer offices after he left.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 2, 2003
In Baltimore City Man, woman shot in East Baltimore in year's first homicides A man and woman were found shot dead on an East Baltimore street early yesterday and marked the city's first two homicides of the new year, Baltimore police said. Police were called about 1:45 a.m. to the 2100 block of Cliftwood Ave., just south of Clifton Park, after a report of a shooting. They arrived to find the victims lying on the street, a detective said. The identity of the victims and other details involving the shooting had not been released by police.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2002
Vision problems short of blindness are one of the most daunting disabilities facing seniors. Despite advances in laser eye surgery and other technologies to perfect the vision of the young, there are few answers for conditions that affect older people. Because of these difficulties, the operators of a new nonprofit vision center in Savage hope to make their center an important stop for many older Howard County residents with uncorrectable visual impairments. It is one of the few places between Baltimore and Washington to offer help with tools to cope with such disabilities, which experts say will affect hundreds of thousands of seniors in coming years.
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