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NEWS
March 8, 2005
On March 6, 2005, MARGARETCATHERINE "Kathy" MACNEIL (nee Thayer) beloved wife of Tom Mac Neil, loving daughter of Nancy Thayer and the late Samuel Thayer, dear sister of Debby Schuebel, Kim Nicholson and Nancy Sneed, adored granddaughter of August Rothe, cherished sister-in-law of Michael Nicholson and Michael Mac Neil. Also survived by loving aunts, uncles, niece, nephews, cousins and friends. Friends may call at the HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue, on Monday from 6 to 9 P.M. and Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Services will be held on Wednesday at 10 A.M. at the funeral home.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alejandro Danois and Alejandro Danois,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
South River's Scott LaRue had heard enough. During the Seahawks' second-round lacrosse playoff game against Arundel last season, LaRue said opposing players were needling him about his ability. He took offense not only because it was directed at him, but also because he felt his teammates were being disrespected, too. "They were talking to me during the game, telling me that I wasn't a good enough player and that I wasn't going anywhere with lacrosse," LaRue said. With his team down by a goal with about eight minutes left in the third quarter, he scored three goals in a three-minute stretch, silencing the on-field trash talk and leading the Seahawks to a 15-10 victory.
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FEATURES
By Judith Green | May 12, 1998
Metropolitan Opera baritone Cornell MacNeil will receive the Voce d'Oro Lifetime Achievement Medallion from the Baltimore Opera in June, after he serves on the judges' panel for the opera's 33rd vocal competition.MacNeil is known as a Verdi baritone, with a wide range and the striking top notes necessary for dramatic roles such as Rigoletto and Macbeth He is also known for his Baron Scarpia, the villain in Puccini's "Tosca." He has sung at the Met since 1959.Other judges for the competition are conductor Christian Badea and soprano Licia Albanese, a previous Voce d'Oro medalist.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 20, 2005
IF ZINFANDEL WERE a guy, most women would want to date him. That is how Karen MacNeil likes to talk about wine. It is the relaxed tone that runs through her 13-part public television series, Wine, Food & Friends. It airs in the Baltimore area on Maryland Public Television at 1 p.m. Saturdays. She can speak in another voice, that of the published expert, author of The Wine Bible (Workman Publishing Co., 2001, $19.95), a woman conversant with Brix, astringency and malolactic fermentation.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 15, 1995
LONDON -- Ian MacNeil is the designer who made his theatrical reputation by putting an Edwardian dollhouse on stilts and busting it apart.The quake comes near the end of J.B. Priestley's "An Inspector Calls," which opens at Baltimore's Mechanic Theatre on Tuesday. Before the house falls, Mr. MacNeil unleashes all the tricks of the set designer's trade, from pouring rain onto the stage to using more fog than a heavy metal rock video. He also creates a hellish landscape of 20th-century Britain, borrowing imagery from T.S. Eliot's "The Wasteland" and the motion pictures "The Exorcist" and "The Third Man."
NEWS
July 13, 2000
Robert Runcie, 78, the 102nd archbishop of Canterbury who led the Church of England through a decade of theological turmoil, died yesterday in London after a battle with cancer. Bishop Runcie sometimes appeared as the leading critic of Margaret Thatcher's government. He antagonized Mrs. Thatcher, who had appointed him, through his prayers for all the dead of the Falkland Islands war and his criticism of the government's tactics in beating a strike by coal miners. Abraham Horwitz, 89, director of the Pan American Health Organization for almost 20 years, died of pneumonia Monday in Washington.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | April 20, 2005
IF ZINFANDEL WERE a guy, most women would want to date him. That is how Karen MacNeil likes to talk about wine. It is the relaxed tone that runs through her 13-part public television series, Wine, Food & Friends. It airs in the Baltimore area on Maryland Public Television at 1 p.m. Saturdays. She can speak in another voice, that of the published expert, author of The Wine Bible (Workman Publishing Co., 2001, $19.95), a woman conversant with Brix, astringency and malolactic fermentation.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1991
NEW YORK AIDS activists rushed onto the sets of the "CBS Evening News with Dan Rather" and PBS's "MacNeil-Lehrer NewsHour" last night, disrupting the live broadcasts with their protests about the lack of news coverage of AIDS during the Persian Gulf crisis.As Rather was beginning the CBS evening newscast, one protester jumped in front of the camera, shouting, "Fight AIDS, not Arabs!" The camera shifted off Rather and then momentarily went to black.Rather later mentioned the incident on the air, saying, "I want to apologize to you for the way the broadcast came on the air tonight.
FEATURES
By Justin Davidson and Justin Davidson,NEWSDAY | January 5, 2005
It'd be nice to report that PBS' new linguistic safari, Do You Speak American?, is tubular, pro-nasty or even just mad real, but omg, it's, like, so not. If that sentence mystifies you, it could be because: a) it's an inauthentic scramble of surfer- speak, hip-hop street talk, instant-message shorthand and Valley Girlish; b) neither you nor anyone you know is 25 or younger; or c) you hold your nose well clear of the bubbling language stew of popular culture. Whatever the root of this ignorance, the implacably pleasant Robert MacNeil, former co-anchor of public television's MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour, will take you by the hand and guide you through the infernal byways of American speech, that up-side-underworld where "sick," "ill" and "nasty" are terms of approval.
NEWS
By Alejandro Danois and Alejandro Danois,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
South River's Scott LaRue had heard enough. During the Seahawks' second-round lacrosse playoff game against Arundel last season, LaRue said opposing players were needling him about his ability. He took offense not only because it was directed at him, but also because he felt his teammates were being disrespected, too. "They were talking to me during the game, telling me that I wasn't a good enough player and that I wasn't going anywhere with lacrosse," LaRue said. With his team down by a goal with about eight minutes left in the third quarter, he scored three goals in a three-minute stretch, silencing the on-field trash talk and leading the Seahawks to a 15-10 victory.
NEWS
March 8, 2005
On March 6, 2005, MARGARETCATHERINE "Kathy" MACNEIL (nee Thayer) beloved wife of Tom Mac Neil, loving daughter of Nancy Thayer and the late Samuel Thayer, dear sister of Debby Schuebel, Kim Nicholson and Nancy Sneed, adored granddaughter of August Rothe, cherished sister-in-law of Michael Nicholson and Michael Mac Neil. Also survived by loving aunts, uncles, niece, nephews, cousins and friends. Friends may call at the HUBBARD FUNERAL HOME INC., 4107 Wilkens Avenue, on Monday from 6 to 9 P.M. and Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Services will be held on Wednesday at 10 A.M. at the funeral home.
FEATURES
By Justin Davidson and Justin Davidson,NEWSDAY | January 5, 2005
It'd be nice to report that PBS' new linguistic safari, Do You Speak American?, is tubular, pro-nasty or even just mad real, but omg, it's, like, so not. If that sentence mystifies you, it could be because: a) it's an inauthentic scramble of surfer- speak, hip-hop street talk, instant-message shorthand and Valley Girlish; b) neither you nor anyone you know is 25 or younger; or c) you hold your nose well clear of the bubbling language stew of popular culture. Whatever the root of this ignorance, the implacably pleasant Robert MacNeil, former co-anchor of public television's MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour, will take you by the hand and guide you through the infernal byways of American speech, that up-side-underworld where "sick," "ill" and "nasty" are terms of approval.
NEWS
July 13, 2000
Robert Runcie, 78, the 102nd archbishop of Canterbury who led the Church of England through a decade of theological turmoil, died yesterday in London after a battle with cancer. Bishop Runcie sometimes appeared as the leading critic of Margaret Thatcher's government. He antagonized Mrs. Thatcher, who had appointed him, through his prayers for all the dead of the Falkland Islands war and his criticism of the government's tactics in beating a strike by coal miners. Abraham Horwitz, 89, director of the Pan American Health Organization for almost 20 years, died of pneumonia Monday in Washington.
FEATURES
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1998
"Breaking News," by Robert MacNeil. Nan A Talese Doubleday. 406 pages. $24.95. Revered network news anchorman Grant Munro - "Gregory Peck" to the mysterious and jivy online gossip columnist "Hollygo Lightly" - is facing 60 and the biggest decision of his aging career: Should he get a facelift?It's hard to imagine that revered television newsman Robert MacNeil ever spent a nanosecond pondering a nip-and-tuck. But in all other ways - and maybe in this way too, who knows? - Grant Munro is MacNeil.
FEATURES
By Judith Green | May 12, 1998
Metropolitan Opera baritone Cornell MacNeil will receive the Voce d'Oro Lifetime Achievement Medallion from the Baltimore Opera in June, after he serves on the judges' panel for the opera's 33rd vocal competition.MacNeil is known as a Verdi baritone, with a wide range and the striking top notes necessary for dramatic roles such as Rigoletto and Macbeth He is also known for his Baron Scarpia, the villain in Puccini's "Tosca." He has sung at the Met since 1959.Other judges for the competition are conductor Christian Badea and soprano Licia Albanese, a previous Voce d'Oro medalist.
BUSINESS
By Eleanor Yang and Eleanor Yang,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1997
Chalk up another birdie of a deal for Rockville-based Softspikes Inc., the pioneer maker of replaceable nonmetal golf cleats. Last month, the company signed a joint operating agreement with MacNeill Engineering Worldwide, a Marlborough, Mass.-based manufacturer of cleats for soccer, football, baseball and golf shoes.Starting Oct. 1, MacNeill will take over Softspikes' manufacturing, and Softspikes will take charge of MacNeill's marketing and sales.After nearly a year of negotiating, the two privately held companies signed a 10-year deal in which they won't exchange any money.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,Sun Theater Critic | October 19, 1995
J.B. Priestley's "An Inspector Calls" isn't your usual mystery-thriller, and director Stephen Daldry and designer Ian MacNeil have given it a magnificently unusual stage treatment.When the curtain rises, it's raining -- pouring, actually -- on stage. Even more stunning is the small townhouse on stilts that is the central element of MacNeil's ingenious set. In the course of this fast-paced production -- which is launching its national tour at the Mechanic Theatre -- that house opens up like a hinged dollhouse, introducing us to its upper-class British inhabitants,and eventually, like those inhabitants, spilling its guts and crumbling.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Daily News | August 1, 1991
In the first collaboration between public television and a commercial network news division on a news event, PBS and NBC announced yesterday they will jointly cover the Democratic and Republican conventions next summer.The coverage will come from both the NBC News Division and PBS' "The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" with reporting teams led by Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer for PBS and Tom Brokaw for NBC.The move is the latest cost-containment move by NBC, which has closed domestic and international news bureaus and reduced its work force in the news division.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
"Homicide" is back! But tonight also marks a notable departure, as anchor Robert MacNeil retires from the nightly PBS news desk. Baltimore's Alan Keyes is also profiled in a new series looking at the 1996 presidential hopefuls.* "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" (6 p.m.-7 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Title namesake Robert MacNeil makes his last appearance, and a nostalgic special edition marks his departure -- as well as the 20th anniversary of the program. Next week, the show becomes merely "The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer."
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,Sun Theater Critic | October 19, 1995
J.B. Priestley's "An Inspector Calls" isn't your usual mystery-thriller, and director Stephen Daldry and designer Ian MacNeil have given it a magnificently unusual stage treatment.When the curtain rises, it's raining -- pouring, actually -- on stage. Even more stunning is the small townhouse on stilts that is the central element of MacNeil's ingenious set. In the course of this fast-paced production -- which is launching its national tour at the Mechanic Theatre -- that house opens up like a hinged dollhouse, introducing us to its upper-class British inhabitants,and eventually, like those inhabitants, spilling its guts and crumbling.
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