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By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
A half-century after his untimely death at the age of 38, celebrated tenor and movie star Mario Lanza is receiving fresh medical attention from a Baltimore doctor who takes a dim view of one of the singer's weight-loss treatments - injections of the urine of pregnant women, a controversial therapy with new followers today. Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, vice chairman of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Medical Care Clinical Center at the Veterans Administration Hospital downtown, teamed up with Armando Cesari, Lanza's Australia-based biographer, for an article about the singer's health issues just out in The Pharos, the journal of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
A half-century after his untimely death at the age of 38, celebrated tenor and movie star Mario Lanza is receiving fresh medical attention from a Baltimore doctor who takes a dim view of one of the singer's weight-loss treatments - injections of the urine of pregnant women, a controversial therapy with new followers today. Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, vice chairman of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Medical Care Clinical Center at the Veterans Administration Hospital downtown, teamed up with Armando Cesari, Lanza's Australia-based biographer, for an article about the singer's health issues just out in The Pharos, the journal of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha.
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NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2005
Behind every famous number lies a story. And in this season of sickness, when the thermometer frequently emerges from the bathroom cabinet, few numbers in medicine are as familiar as 98.6 - the normal temperature of the human body. Celebrated in song and enshrined for more than a century in schoolbooks and medical texts, 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit is the benchmark many of us use to determine who goes to school or work and who stays in bed. There's just one little problem: 98.6, it turns out, is a medical myth.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
Who will speak for the pharaoh Akhenaten, the builder of temples and cities who reigned over ancient Egypt 2,400 years ago? Who will explain his oddly shaped head, sunken eyes, pendulous breasts and a belly that made him look pregnant? That would be Irwin M. Braverman. The Yale medical school dermatology professor will address a University of Maryland medical school conference today on the genetic disorders that might have determined Akhaenaten's strange appearance. He has spent months pouring over images of Akhenaten and come up with a theory about the teenage pharaoh's peculiarities.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
A group of Baltimore doctors say the century-old belief that 98.6 degrees constitutes a person's normal body temperature should be discarded because, well, it is wrong.Researchers from the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center looked at oral temperatures taken from 148 healthy people and found their average reading to be 98.2 degrees -- two notches below the little red arrow that signals "normal" on a glass thermometer.More importantly, a reading between 96 and 99.9 degrees would fall into the normal range for most people.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun reporter | May 2, 2008
Who will speak for the pharaoh Akhenaten, the builder of temples and cities who reigned over ancient Egypt 2,400 years ago? Who will explain his oddly shaped head, sunken eyes, pendulous breasts and a belly that made him look pregnant? That would be Irwin M. Braverman. The Yale medical school dermatology professor will address a University of Maryland medical school conference today on the genetic disorders that might have determined Akhaenaten's strange appearance. He has spent months pouring over images of Akhenaten and come up with a theory about the teenage pharaoh's peculiarities.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
On August 5, 2003, JOSEPH T.; beloved husband of Catherine C. Mackowiak (nee Kerns); beloved step father of John D. Milkowski and his wife Diane, Patricia Spinazzola and her husband R. Stephen; brother of Julia Thorpe; grandfather of Craig, Cary and Justin Milkowski and Brian Spinazzola. Also survived by six great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Thomas J. Skarda Funeral Home, Hudson Street and Linwood Avenue, from 7 to 9 P.M., on Wednesday, and 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., on Thursday.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 11, 1996
When Edgar Allan Poe died in this town in 1849, newspapers gave the cause of death as "congestion of the brain" and "cerebral inflammation," archaic terms that suggest doctors had no definitive explanation but believed Poe's death was related to a severe neurological disorder. ("We have no idea what killed him, but the poor guy sure had gone bananas.")Now Dr. R. Michael Benitez's fresh review of the case tends to support the idea that, in the last four days of his life, Poe's central nervous system was under attack by a vicious viral disease.
SPORTS
June 5, 2002
Who's hot Johnny Damon of the Red Sox has gone 7-for-9 over his past two games. Who's not Travis Lee of the Phillies went 0-for-3 and stranded five runners, drawing loud boos from the home fans. Line of the day Rob Mackowiak, Pirates RF AB ....... R .......... H ..... RBI ...... HR 2 .......... 2 ........... 2 ........ 3 .......... 2 On deck Randy Johnson of the Diamondbacks tries to become the majors' second 10-game winner today. He said it "I'm convinced he's going to be a better ballplayer than I ever was."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2005
Behind every famous number lies a story. And in this season of sickness, when the thermometer frequently emerges from the bathroom cabinet, few numbers in medicine are as familiar as 98.6 - the normal temperature of the human body. Celebrated in song and enshrined for more than a century in schoolbooks and medical texts, 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit is the benchmark many of us use to determine who goes to school or work and who stays in bed. There's just one little problem: 98.6, it turns out, is a medical myth.
NEWS
August 7, 2003
On August 5, 2003, JOSEPH T.; beloved husband of Catherine C. Mackowiak (nee Kerns); beloved step father of John D. Milkowski and his wife Diane, Patricia Spinazzola and her husband R. Stephen; brother of Julia Thorpe; grandfather of Craig, Cary and Justin Milkowski and Brian Spinazzola. Also survived by six great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Thomas J. Skarda Funeral Home, Hudson Street and Linwood Avenue, from 7 to 9 P.M., on Wednesday, and 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., on Thursday.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
A group of Baltimore doctors say the century-old belief that 98.6 degrees constitutes a person's normal body temperature should be discarded because, well, it is wrong.Researchers from the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center looked at oral temperatures taken from 148 healthy people and found their average reading to be 98.2 degrees -- two notches below the little red arrow that signals "normal" on a glass thermometer.More importantly, a reading between 96 and 99.9 degrees would fall into the normal range for most people.
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