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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 27, 2009
Landis "Mac" MacIntosh, a retired information technologist and a former Federal Hill resident, died of kidney cancer Aug. 11 at his Claremont, Calif., home. He was 76. Mr. MacIntosh was born in Ashland, Ohio, and raised in Clifton, N.J. After graduating from Montclair State University in 1956 with a degree in business administration, he was commissioned an officer in the Marine Corps and served until 1958. He remained active in the reserves until 1963. He started his business career with Penn Mutual Insurance Co. in Philadelphia, and later was vice president of information technology from 1960 to 1980 at Scott Paper Co., also in Philadelphia.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
A 29-year-old Point of Rocks man was killed Thursday when his motorcycle left the road as he fled from a Maryland State Police traffic stop near Hagerstown, authorities said. Zachary A. Macintosh, of the 1600 block of Gibbons Road, was pronounced dead around 1 p.m. along eastbound Route 40 near Beverly Road, where his 1999 Suzuki GSXR-750 motorcycle went off the road, State Police said. Hagerstown Barrack commander Lt. Michael Fluharty saw a man on a motorcycle, later identified as Macintosh, going between 75 and 80 mph in a 45 mph zone, and tried to pull him over, State Police said.
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BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | December 6, 1993
Apple Computer Inc. is developing a new Macintosh that includes an Intel 486SX microprocessor, giving the computer the ability to run DOS and Windows software along with Macintosh software.One would think such a machine would create a stir, since it represents something close to the Holy Grail of personal computing: a computer that runs all the popular programs, including DOS, Windows and Macintosh. It also represents the most tangible evidence yet of big changes at Apple under its new president and chief executive, Michael Spindler.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 27, 2009
Landis "Mac" MacIntosh, a retired information technologist and a former Federal Hill resident, died of kidney cancer Aug. 11 at his Claremont, Calif., home. He was 76. Mr. MacIntosh was born in Ashland, Ohio, and raised in Clifton, N.J. After graduating from Montclair State University in 1956 with a degree in business administration, he was commissioned an officer in the Marine Corps and served until 1958. He remained active in the reserves until 1963. He started his business career with Penn Mutual Insurance Co. in Philadelphia, and later was vice president of information technology from 1960 to 1980 at Scott Paper Co., also in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 27, 1992
TOKYO -- Though Apple Computer Inc. owns less than 10 percent of the Japanese personal-computer market, the Macintosh seems to be everywhere here: a prop on a weekly television show and on quiz shows, on T-shirts and on the desks of yuppie business people.In fact, the Macintosh may have more cachet in Japan than in the United States because of the way it fits with how Japanese work and -- some say -- simply because it appeals to the California-loving Japanese.But in a country that is a tough sell for U.S. high-tech companies and is dominated by NEC Corp.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz and Michael Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | October 29, 1990
It's hard to walk away from a big Macintosh demonstration without a warm, fuzzy feeling.The Mac is compact, elegant and simple to use. Its software is well-designed and consistent, and Apple reps are so friendly and helpful that you wonder why everybody doesn't succumb to a Big Mac Attack and abandon whatever computer they're using now.Actually, there's a very good reason. All this warmth and fuzziness has been very expensive -- until now.But Apple has finally escaped the BMW set with the introduction of three new, competitively priced machines that give average computer buyers a shot at the Mac's power and simplicity.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 13, 1992
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Attention, shoppers: There's some unusual merchandise moving onto store shelves alongside television sets, power tools and children's clothes -- Apple computers.In the latest move by computer manufacturers to take their wares to where people shop, Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple Computer Inc. has announced a deal with Sears to let the retail giant sell several models of Macintosh computers.Apple's Macintoshes will initially sell in 70 Sears stores that have Office Center outlets.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | November 25, 1996
WE WERE PREPARED to say nice things about Apple Computer Inc.'s Macintosh Performa 6400/200 computer when all of a sudden Apple cut the price. Now we are compelled to say even nicer things about it.The Performa 6400 is not cheap, either in price or in construction. But when Apple recently cut the suggested list to $2,199, from $2,799, it eliminated our only major criticism of the machine. The result is a solid, fast, versatile and easy-to-use personal computer for the home and small office markets.
BUSINESS
By PETER H. LEWIS | May 27, 1991
The Apple Macintosh has long been acknowledged as easier to use than the more widely sold IBM PCs and compatibles, and the key to that ease of use has been the computer's operating system software.Apple Computer Inc.'s improved version of the Macintosh operating system, called System 7.0, adds more power to the computer without increasing its complexity.The first thing a user will notice about System 7.0 is the subtle addition of 3-D effects and color shading on the "desktop," the area of the screen where work takes place.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis | April 1, 1996
WAS IT JUST a decade ago that we waited for the glorious arrival of Halley's comet, only to see a little fuzz ball smudging the night sky? Despite the disappointment of that event 10 years ago, some of us still venture out in the wee hours to catch a glimpse of potential greatness.So, on a dark night last week, we went looking for two new transients, one the comet 1996 B2, whizzing through space to make its closest approach to Earth, and the other Apple Computer's new Macintosh System 7.5.3 operating system software.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | September 26, 2008
Hugh Macintosh, a civil engineer who had lived and worked in Iran, died Monday of lymphoma at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Lutherville resident was 68. Mr. Macintosh was born in Nantwich, England, and raised in Edinburgh, Scotland. After earning his degree in civil engineering from the University of Edinburgh, he spent time traveling through Europe. "He rode the Borough, the same type of motorcycle that Lawrence of Arabia rode," said a daughter, Andrea Macintosh Whiteway of Potomac. Mr. Macintosh worked for an engineering firm in Manchester, England, until joining International Management and Engineering Group, a company that built pipelines in Iran.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2007
Apple Inc. Shares rose 15 cents to a record $198.95, after reaching $200.96 during the day. The share price has more than doubled this year on sales of Macintosh personal computers and demand for the iPhone.
BUSINESS
By TERRIL YUE JONES and TERRIL YUE JONES,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 2005
REDMOND, Wash. -- As Apple Computer Inc. enjoys rebounding popularity among computer users rejecting the dominance of Microsoft Corp., one of the biggest beneficiaries is - oddly enough - likely to be Microsoft. That's because outside of Apple itself, Microsoft sells more software for Apple's flagship Macintosh computers than any other company. With sales of Macintosh machines rising sharply, archrival Microsoft stands to bolster its well-established Office software and other programs for the Mac. "We're ecumenical people," Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates said.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
Jef Raskin, 61, a computer interface expert who conceived Apple Computer Inc.'s groundbreaking Macintosh computer but left the company before it came to market, died Saturday in San Jose, Calif. In December, he told friends he had pancreatic cancer. Mr. Raskin joined Apple in 1978 - as its 31st employee - to start the young company's publications department. At the time, computers were primarily text-based and users had to remember a series of arcane commands to perform the simplest tasks.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 12, 2005
CUPERTINO, Calif. - Apple Computer Inc. said yesterday that it will split its stock 2-for-1 because its share price has more than tripled in the past year on surging demand for the company's iPod music player. Apple last split its shares in 2000 at the height of the Internet bubble. Holders as of Feb. 18 will get an extra share for each one owned, and split-adjusted trading will start Feb. 28, Apple said. Chief executive Steve Jobs has used the iPod to broaden the company's revenue beyond its Macintosh computers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Noah Matthews and Noah Matthews,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 26, 2004
There were many summer nights in the rural Midwest when I was convinced that the Northern Lights were really spaceships looking for a place to land. It didn't help that I had seen every UFO movie made during the 1950s, and was scared of my own shadow. I'm not saying that UFOs are real, but the UFO Anthology, a three-CD set for Windows and Macintosh computers, sure makes a strong case for their existence. The collection was made several years ago, but it contains an encyclopedic guide to UFOs up to that time.
BUSINESS
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 20, 1992
Offices with both IBM PCs and Macintosh computers are becoming more and more commonplace.Trouble is, the DOS and Mac computers are inherently incompatible with each other. For this reason, many solutions to integrate the two systems, such as networks, are available.One solution, SoftPC from Insignia Solutions, allows the Macintosh to run PC software via software emulation. The Macintosh simulates the PC's capabilities.While this is an ideal solution for many, SoftPC can emulate only the slower "AT" class computer.
BUSINESS
By Knight Ridder | April 16, 1991
CUPERTINO, Calif. -- Wall Street's recent euphoria over those new lower-cost products from Apple Computer Inc. ended abruptly yesterday when the company announced that all of its additional Macintosh sales produced no increase in profits during the second fiscal quarter ended March 29.Disappointed investors dumped their Apple stock en masse, pushing the shares down $9.50 to $62.25 on very heavy volume in over-the-counter trading. Investors and Wall Street analysts clearly had expected strong demand for new Macintosh models to fuel a sharp jump in profits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2003
With its muscular 64-bit processor and high-velocity hard drive, the new Apple Power Mac G5 is among the most powerful desktop computers on earth. It's just what you'd want for playing a sophisticated 3-D adventure game. But if you buy game software from MonkeyByte.com of San Leandro, Calif., you're more likely to get a game that resembles something you played in a video arcade circa 1985. That's fine with Yon Hardisty, MonkeyByte's chief executive officer. "Maybe they're not as pretty as Quake and Age of Empires, [two classic PC games]
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Markoff and John Markoff,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 2003
SAN FRANCISCO - Steven Jobs, chief executive of Apple Computer, announced an alliance with IBM last week that will add a powerful IBM-designed 64-bit microprocessor chip to Apple computers. The move is a bid to stay innovative and independent in a computing world dominated by Microsoft and Intel. Introduction of the G5 chip, industry analysts said, is crucial to keeping Apple competitive with the ubiquitous Intel Pentium-based personal computers and to jump-start sales of Apple's Macintosh personal computers, which have been relatively flat.
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