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Machismo

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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 24, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Expressions of good old American macho are filling the air as the country, collectively and individually, decides how to deal with the threat of spreading anthrax infection and possible death from terrorism of whatever source. One view seems to hold that surely John Wayne, were he alive and a member of Congress, would not have fled the Capitol upon signs of the scary white powder delivered by mail to the office of Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle. The leaders of the House of Representatives who decided the better part of valor was to clear out while the place could be examined thoroughly were quickly labeled "wimps" by one New York tabloid newspaper.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | August 23, 2011
Yes, Rick Perry might seem a little, well, out there with some of his public statements. But the Texas governor has something that our current commanded-in-chief lacks: Overt machismo.  And this cannot be underestimated. Macho men have a long history of winning elections. George W. Bush played the macho guy well, always clearing brush on his Texas ranch and challenging terrorists with tough-guy statements ("Bring 'em on," "Smoke 'em out"). Vladimir Putin is so macho his vacations include tiger hunting, judo tournaments and riding horses.
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FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg | August 7, 1996
Stephen Hunter is in the eye of the swarm."We noticed a certain buzz gathering around the guy," said Will Dana, senior editor of Rolling Stone.Hunter, The Sun's film critic, has been named Hot Author of the year by Rolling Stone. The best-selling author's latest thriller is "Black Light." Two of his other books, "Dirty White Boys" and "Point of Impact," are Hollywood-bound."I suppose I was formed by too many movies and too much television," Hunter says in the Aug. 22 issue of Rolling Stone.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | November 16, 2007
The keenest observation about the Coen brothers' No Country for Old Men came from its ace cinematographer, Roger Deakins. He said from the moment he read the script he saw it as a Sam Peckinpah movie. With all the ink spilled over the resurgence of the Western, Peckinpah, the most influential and talented director of Westerns of the past 50 years, and for my money the greatest of all American filmmakers, has received short shrift. His erratic output and excesses, his long-declining energy and his pop-culture image as a purveyor of mindless (versus brainy)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | August 23, 2011
Yes, Rick Perry might seem a little, well, out there with some of his public statements. But the Texas governor has something that our current commanded-in-chief lacks: Overt machismo.  And this cannot be underestimated. Macho men have a long history of winning elections. George W. Bush played the macho guy well, always clearing brush on his Texas ranch and challenging terrorists with tough-guy statements ("Bring 'em on," "Smoke 'em out"). Vladimir Putin is so macho his vacations include tiger hunting, judo tournaments and riding horses.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | November 16, 2007
The keenest observation about the Coen brothers' No Country for Old Men came from its ace cinematographer, Roger Deakins. He said from the moment he read the script he saw it as a Sam Peckinpah movie. With all the ink spilled over the resurgence of the Western, Peckinpah, the most influential and talented director of Westerns of the past 50 years, and for my money the greatest of all American filmmakers, has received short shrift. His erratic output and excesses, his long-declining energy and his pop-culture image as a purveyor of mindless (versus brainy)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 22, 1992
For Edward James Olmos, both the ayes and eyes have it.The ayes have it because he's said yes to responsibility and no to despair and invested his considerable power as a movie star in earnest projects aimed at making money only as a tertiary goal: Before he makes money, Olmos wants to make a difference.And the eyes have it because his are such powerful beacons of will and intelligence: He could glare his way into a missile bunker or a bank vault. When he lays the eyes on someone in his new film "American Me," one understands implicitly that that person will soon cease to exist.
NEWS
May 26, 1995
The Howard County Council is already stretched thin by serving simultaneously as the liquor and zoning boards. Now, it wants to be the school board, too.In a move that will undoubtedly deepen the divisions between county government and school officials in Howard, the three Republican members of the County Council without warning last week broke with tradition by attempting to dictate how the school system spends county funds.With an amendment crafted by Councilman Darrel Drown and co-sponsored by council Chairman Charles C. Feaga, the Republican majority is attempting to eliminate the position of director of high schools.
NEWS
October 11, 1993
Argentine President's Carlos Menem's yearning for a second term after his current mandate ends in 1995 is at fever pitch now that his Peronist Party has triumphed in congressional elections. There is, however, a problem: constitutional provisions limiting presidents to single six-year terms. To remove this obstacle, Mr. Menem has to cajole the legislature into calling a constitutional convention, and to do that he intends to hold a pressure-building referendum on the nation's single obsessive issue -- the flamboyant president himself.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
A 21-year-old Pasadena man will have 18 months in the state penitentiary to think about the "pride and machismo" that led him to speed down Route 10 at more than 100 mph after drinking and slam his car into trees, killing two young men with him.Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Clayton Greene Jr. added five years of supervised probation to the prison time for John M. Schouster in a plea agreement reached before the trial. Prosecutors had asked for six months behind bars.Schouster pleaded guilty to two counts of negligent homicide while under the influence of alcohol and one count of negligent driving.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 24, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Expressions of good old American macho are filling the air as the country, collectively and individually, decides how to deal with the threat of spreading anthrax infection and possible death from terrorism of whatever source. One view seems to hold that surely John Wayne, were he alive and a member of Congress, would not have fled the Capitol upon signs of the scary white powder delivered by mail to the office of Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle. The leaders of the House of Representatives who decided the better part of valor was to clear out while the place could be examined thoroughly were quickly labeled "wimps" by one New York tabloid newspaper.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
A 21-year-old Pasadena man will have 18 months in the state penitentiary to think about the "pride and machismo" that led him to speed down Route 10 at more than 100 mph after drinking and slam his car into trees, killing two young men with him.Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Clayton Greene Jr. added five years of supervised probation to the prison time for John M. Schouster in a plea agreement reached before the trial. Prosecutors had asked for six months behind bars.Schouster pleaded guilty to two counts of negligent homicide while under the influence of alcohol and one count of negligent driving.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg | August 7, 1996
Stephen Hunter is in the eye of the swarm."We noticed a certain buzz gathering around the guy," said Will Dana, senior editor of Rolling Stone.Hunter, The Sun's film critic, has been named Hot Author of the year by Rolling Stone. The best-selling author's latest thriller is "Black Light." Two of his other books, "Dirty White Boys" and "Point of Impact," are Hollywood-bound."I suppose I was formed by too many movies and too much television," Hunter says in the Aug. 22 issue of Rolling Stone.
FEATURES
By Susan Hipsley and Susan Hipsley,Special to The Sun | July 30, 1995
To think about time as a tangible notion is like trying to hold onto a very slippery, amorphous fish while it's swimming in a boundless sea. But intrepid anglers know patience pays off.Here are some other discoveries about the temporal world from the Time Saver notebook. They're under the heading, "Everything I Need to Know I Learned by Forgetting All That Came Before the Moment I Realized I Needed to Know This Thing." If you didn't follow that, read on.* To use time to best advantage, don't regard it as a taskmaster, foe or inexplicable alien.
NEWS
May 26, 1995
The Howard County Council is already stretched thin by serving simultaneously as the liquor and zoning boards. Now, it wants to be the school board, too.In a move that will undoubtedly deepen the divisions between county government and school officials in Howard, the three Republican members of the County Council without warning last week broke with tradition by attempting to dictate how the school system spends county funds.With an amendment crafted by Councilman Darrel Drown and co-sponsored by council Chairman Charles C. Feaga, the Republican majority is attempting to eliminate the position of director of high schools.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Staff Writer | November 17, 1993
Garrison Keillor called back from a Kentucky hotel. Eastern Standard Time. "I think." Mr. Keillor wasn't perfectly sure of his whereabouts but was perfectly prepared to address the state of guyhood."
FEATURES
By Susan Hipsley and Susan Hipsley,Special to The Sun | July 30, 1995
To think about time as a tangible notion is like trying to hold onto a very slippery, amorphous fish while it's swimming in a boundless sea. But intrepid anglers know patience pays off.Here are some other discoveries about the temporal world from the Time Saver notebook. They're under the heading, "Everything I Need to Know I Learned by Forgetting All That Came Before the Moment I Realized I Needed to Know This Thing." If you didn't follow that, read on.* To use time to best advantage, don't regard it as a taskmaster, foe or inexplicable alien.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Staff Writer | November 17, 1993
Garrison Keillor called back from a Kentucky hotel. Eastern Standard Time. "I think." Mr. Keillor wasn't perfectly sure of his whereabouts but was perfectly prepared to address the state of guyhood."
NEWS
October 11, 1993
Argentine President's Carlos Menem's yearning for a second term after his current mandate ends in 1995 is at fever pitch now that his Peronist Party has triumphed in congressional elections. There is, however, a problem: constitutional provisions limiting presidents to single six-year terms. To remove this obstacle, Mr. Menem has to cajole the legislature into calling a constitutional convention, and to do that he intends to hold a pressure-building referendum on the nation's single obsessive issue -- the flamboyant president himself.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 22, 1992
For Edward James Olmos, both the ayes and eyes have it.The ayes have it because he's said yes to responsibility and no to despair and invested his considerable power as a movie star in earnest projects aimed at making money only as a tertiary goal: Before he makes money, Olmos wants to make a difference.And the eyes have it because his are such powerful beacons of will and intelligence: He could glare his way into a missile bunker or a bank vault. When he lays the eyes on someone in his new film "American Me," one understands implicitly that that person will soon cease to exist.
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