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By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | July 21, 1994
USAir, struggling to cut $1 billion in annual costs, will be forced to negotiate with an additional 7,800 employees for concessions as the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers has been chosen to represent the workers.Spurred by sharp layoffs earlier this year, the fleet service workers, who load and unload airplanes, voted overwhelmingly in May to unionize. Because none of the three unions seeking to represent them received a majority, a runoff election was held between the top vote-getters -- the Machinists and the United Steelworkers of America.
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BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater and Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
After decades of manufacturing decline in Baltimore, city officials say they believe industry is poised to bounce back — and they want to promote a new education track in city schools to train students for the field. The Computer Numerical Control Manufacturing program, being offered this year at Carver Vocational-Technical High School, will train high school students for hard-to-fill skilled machinist jobs. Despite years of job losses, more than 12,000 people worked at more than 440 manufacturing companies last year in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | September 4, 1991
Teamsters union workers at the G. Heileman Brewing Co. plant in Halethorpe yesterday crossed picket lines set up by Machinists union strikers at the brewery after the company threatened to fire absentees or cancel their health insurance.The rare split in union solidarity occurred when the international Teamsters union decided not to honor the strike because it said the Machinists were asking for higher wage increases than some 300 Teamsters members got in July after a monthlong strike."We feel damn terrible about it, because the unions are supposed to be in solidarity," said John D. Jefferies, chief negotiator for the striking Machinists.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Naylor W. "Bill" Ruppert, a retired machinist who also had owned and managed a trash-removal business, died Tuesday of lung disease at his Stevensville home. He was 86. Naylor Wilbert Ruppert was born in Baltimore and raised in Garrison. He attended Baltimore County public schools. During World War II, he served with the 82nd Airborne Division until being honorably discharged in 1946. In the late 1940s, he worked as a painter for Thompson's Trailers in Pikesville, and later drove a school bus for Baltimore County public schools.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service The New York Times News Service contributed to this article | July 8, 1993
With its pilots union in the fold, the focus shifted to the Machinists yesterday as Northwest Airlines pressed on with efforts to land an $886 million concessions deal with labor and avoid bankruptcy.Although pilots have signed on to a deal, nothing can happen until all of Northwest's unions agree.In broad terms, the pilots' pact -- unprecedented in the airline industry -- calls for all employees to grant $886 million in concessions over three years in return for an equity stake in the airline of as much as 37.5 percent, as well as three seats on the board of directors.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | October 3, 1992
The union representing 8,300 Machinists at USAir has voted overwhelmingly to reject the company's latest contract offer and to strike.A decision about when to begin the potentially crippling walkout will come no later than Monday, union officials said."
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | October 8, 1992
USAir and striking Machinists resumed talks through federal mediators yesterday as thousands of passengers continued juggling their vacation and business plans to contend with the walkout, now in its fourth day.No progress was reported in the talks, which were taking place in different rooms in Washington, with federal mediators shuttling between them. Since the walkout by the 8,300-member International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers began early Monday, the two sides stayed in touch only by telephone through federal mediator Harry Bickford.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1995
USAir Group Inc. yesterday announced that it has reached a tentative deal with its Machinists union on wage cuts and other concessions, a critical part of the stricken airline's bid for survival.Neither the union nor the company released details of the pact, which follows a tentative March accord with the airline's pilots.The pilots agreed to a 22 percent base wage cut, furloughs and work rule changes that together would save USAir $190 million annually. But the pilots' deal is contingent on USAir reaching agreements with unions representing machinists, flight attendants and dispatchers.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | October 18, 1990
Here was the problem in a nutshell: Baltimore's Micro Machining Inc. had job applicants but not enough different types of work to offer a four-year apprentice program.The solution: Get together with a few competitors, add some state and federal funding and share a pool of apprentices.Micro Machining, a $3 million precision-tool manufacturer with 43 employees, and 10 of its counterparts formed a corporation called MECHTECH, which came up with $20,000 in matching funds from the state Department of Economic and Employment Development and $100,000 from the U.S. Department of Labor.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | September 12, 1996
ST. LOUIS -- Union machinists at McDonnell Douglas Corp. have approved a five-year contract, ending a strike at the company's St. Louis aircraft plant that began June 5. The 6,700 members of the International Association of Machinists Local 837 ratified the contract by a vote of 3,774 to 1,785, even though their bargaining committee didn't endorse the pact.Workers are to begin returning to the plant Monday. The contract stipulates that roughly 5,000 temporary replacement workers must be dismissed by next week.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Frederick A. "Fritz" Glos, a retired machinist and World War II veteran who volunteered onboard the Liberty ship John W. Brown, died Friday of complications from leukemia at a stepdaughter's Perry Hall home. He was 89. Frederick Adam "Fritz" Glos was born in Baltimore and raised on North Port Street. He attended city public schools and then joined the merchant marine. He joined the Navy in 1942 at Bainbridge Naval Training Center in Cecil County and became a gunner's mate and later worked in aviation ordnance.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
Karl Beetz, a retired machinist and maintenance mechanic, died May 25 of heart failure at his Timonium home. He was 90. The son of a mason and a homemaker, Karl Beetz was born and raised in Kronach, Germany. After he graduated in 1938 from a technical high school in his hometown, he was inducted into the German Navy. Mr. Beetz served for four years aboard a minesweeper, attaining the rank of sergeant. Shortly after the war, Mr. Beetz immigrated to Baltimore where his brother Henry Beetz was living.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Wherever Alvin T. Jones has lived throughout his adult life, he has reserved wall space for his Navy memorabilia. He displays his three Air Medals and his Distinguished Flying Cross, his honorable discharge, dated 1945, and a wedding photo of a young uniformed sailor and his bride. Another photo shows Jones in the center of the 10-member crew of a B-24 bomber. At 89, he recalls the name and assignment of each man posing in 1944 in front of that plane. Most notably, he recalls his pilot, Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., the smiling young man holding a puppy in the picture.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 9, 2011
Cecil George Mateer, a retired machinist and Royal Navy veteran, died July 28 of pneumonia at Lorien of Bel Air. He was 90. Born and raised in Belfast, Ireland, Mr. Mateer ran away to the sea when he was 13, and served onboard windjammers as a cabin boy. He later was trained as a machinist and joined the British merchant service, working passenger liners. With the outbreak of World War II, he enlisted in the Royal Navy and served at sea and on land bases at Sierra Leone and Cairo.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 20, 2010
Edward Paul Martuszewski, a retired machinist and former Curtis Bay resident, died Tuesday of cancer at his Chestertown home. He was 83. Mr. Martuszewski, the son of a Davidson Chemical Co. worker and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore, one of 15 children, and raised in Curtis Bay. Mr. Martuszewski attended Baltimore public schools. He enlisted in the Army in 1947 and served in both Japan and Korea, where he was decorated with a Bronze Star. After being discharged in 1952, Mr. Martuszewski returned to Curtis Bay and went to work as a machinist for Harbison Walker Refactories, a fire brick manufacturer.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | October 13, 1992
USAir resumed normal operations yesterday at Baltimore-Washington International Airport and elsewhere as groundworkers returned to their jobs after ratifying a new contract.Last week's strike against USAir by the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers forced the financially troubled airline to cancel one-third of its 2,712 daily jet departures nationwide.Negotiators for the Machinists union and USAir, the largest carrier at BWI, reached a tentative agreement Thursday, ending a four-day walkout.
NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | October 5, 1992
USAir and the union representing some 8,300 Machinists for the airline resumed negotiations in Washington yesterday as the Machinists set a strike deadline of 7 a.m. today barring a settlement or progress, according to the airline.The airline, which is the largest carrier at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, said yesterday that it began talks again with the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) at the union's request with a federal mediator present.
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