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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
A 66-year-old man was seriously injured at the Domino Sugar factory in Baltimore on Sunday afternoon when his right arm was caught in a large piece of machinery, according to the city Fire Department. Emergency personnel responded to the refinery in the 1100 block of Key Highway in Riverside at 2:54 p.m., and began providing medical treatment to the man as workers labored to disassemble the machine and free the man's arm, said Captain Roman Clark, a fire spokesman. "He was stuck there for an hour and 45 minutes," Clark said.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2013
We still have a land line at the house. Quaint, you think? But the number is linked to all manner of accounts, and it would be laborious to change. The consequence, of course, is that we expose ourselves to nuisances. Kathleen once succumbed to a caller soliciting contributions for some fund for law enforcement personnel. Now all of them call us, because they pass the lists around. I have no idea whether these appeals come from legitimate organizations of from the type that spends all the income on paying phone solicitors, donating little or none to the charity.
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NEWS
October 4, 2005
Edward B. "Cholly" Farmer Sr., retired owner of a heavy machinery moving company, died of cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 66. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hampden, he was a 1957 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and served in the Army at Fort Knox, Ky. Mr. Farmer took over the operation of Big Boy's Rigging, an Arbutus business founded by his father. Family members said that before retiring because of ill health four years ago, he moved manufacturing and printing equipment in Baltimore and throughout the Mid-Atlantic region.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2012
A 66-year-old man was seriously injured at the Domino Sugar factory in Baltimore on Sunday afternoon when his right arm was caught in a large piece of machinery, according to the city Fire Department. Emergency personnel responded to the refinery in the 1100 block of Key Highway in Riverside at 2:54 p.m., and began providing medical treatment to the man as workers labored to disassemble the machine and free the man's arm, said Captain Roman Clark, a fire spokesman. "He was stuck there for an hour and 45 minutes," Clark said.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
In neither appearance nor demeanor does Avi Rubin suggest the aura of a troublemaker. He is slight in stature, bespectacled, well-spoken and neat, if informal, in dress. In conversation, you detect confidence but not quite braggadocio. He does not seem to be a threat to democracy. Judging by the reaction to Rubin's most recent work, though, this 35-year-old Johns Hopkins computer scientist might as well be the reincarnation of Josef Stalin, so dangerous is he to the American electoral system.
NEWS
January 16, 1996
Ralph J. Stolle, 91, an inventor who developed the machinery that manufactures pop-tops for metal cans, died Saturday at his Lebanon, Ohio, home.The businessman and inventor held the patent for the Stolle Can Machinery used throughout the world for production of cans.In 1923, he founded Stolle Corp., which developed the tab opener and the machinery for its production. He sold the company to Alcoa in 1975 but remained as chairman.He is listed as an inventor on more than 50 patents.His daughter, Mary Jo Cropper, said he was humble about his success.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Howard County's farming past was in the spotlight last weekend at Mount Pleasant Farm in Woodstock with the seventh annual Farm Heritage Days sponsored the Howard County Antique Farm Machinery Club.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
Crown Cork & Seal Co.'s purchase of a French packaging company will make a Baltimore division of Crown a stronger competitor in an international market worth $18 billion annually, company officials said yesterday.By joining forces, the Baltimore-based Crown machinery division and a Virginia-based subsidiary of the French company will join a few competitors worldwide able to sell all the equipment and services demanded by new bottling and canning plants, said B. Douglas Goodell, vice president of Crown's machinery division.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1998
As it moves closer to wrapping up a three-part divestiture plan, Towson-based Black & Decker Corp. said yesterday that it has completed the sale of its glass-making machinery business, Emhart Glass.Bucher Holding AG of Switzerland purchased Emhart for $194 million, netting Black & Decker $158 million -- significantly more than analysts had predicted.Electing to concentrate on power tools and hardware, Black & Decker is also in the process of selling a controlling interest in its True Temper Sports golf club shaft business to Cornerstone Equity Investors LLC for about $200 million and $4 million in preferred and common stock.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | May 14, 1992
Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc. plans to spend $4 million to renovate its plant at 1200 S. Newkirk St. as part of a plan to remain in the Canton area of East Baltimore.The commitment comes after discussions with city officials who promised to make improvements in roads around the plant, company officials said."Having completed our financial analysis, and considering the promised support for this area by the city, we have decided to remain in our facility on South Newkirk Street in East Baltimore," B. Douglas Goodell, vice president of Crown Cork's machinery division, said in a recent letter to Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
A 34-year old Ellicott City construction worker died Monday morning after an excavator hit him in the head on a residential building site in North Laurel, according to Howard County police. Morgan Tyler Gainer of the 9200 block Crabapple Lane was working on a project at Palace Hall Drive and Skylark Boulevard for the W.F. Wilson and Sons Inc. construction firm based in Elkridge when the machine hit him. Fellow employees called for an ambulance at 7:50 a.m. but Gainer was pronounced dead on the scene just minutes later.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2010
Charles R. Higdon Jr., a retired engineer and former owner of Machinery and Equipment Sales Inc., died Monday of complications after heart surgery at Washington Hospital Center. The Mays Chapel resident was 87. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Higdon was a 1941 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, and two years later, enlisted in the Army Air Forces, where he served as a flight engineer aboard B-29 Superfortress bombers. After the war, he enrolled at the Johns Hopkins University, where he earned a bachelor's degree in engineering in 1949.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | August 16, 2009
The last Howard County employees left the George Howard Building for temporary office quarters in Columbia in November, but a few citizens still show up at the former government headquarters to try to pay their taxes. "People think the county building is still here. They come and want to pay their taxes," ignoring the construction machines, the mud and the blue partitions intended to keep them out, said Clark Interiors' superintendent Jim Summers of the $23.5 million renovation of the government complex on Court House Drive in Ellicott City.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 12, 2007
BOSTON -- So we have a national moratorium of sorts. An unofficial stay of execution. All quiet in the death chambers. In the days since the Supreme Court decided to take on another death penalty case, 11 states - including Texas, the capital of capital punishment - have suspended executions. In two more states, inmates slated for death next week may be granted a reprieve. Even the Europeans who led the World Day Against the Death Penalty on Wednesday must have missed having their favorite international target.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 7, 2007
Thomas Gary Hardie II, a textile machinery business owner who later co-wrote a newspaper column about being a grandparent, died Tuesday of complications from a traumatic brain injury at Roland Park Place. The former Butler resident was 85. Born in New Orleans and raised in Roland Park, he was a 1939 Gilman School graduate and earned an economics degree from Princeton. He served in the Army Air Forces during World War II and was a pilot spotting the enemy in the Philippines. He attained the rank of captain and was awarded an Air Medal for bravery.
NEWS
By Michael Cain and Zach Messitte | March 11, 2007
Imagine the job announcement: "State of Maryland seeks temporary employees to safeguard democracy. Candidates must be willing to work for below the minimum wage without benefits or gratitude, enjoy inflexible and long workdays, attend multiple training sessions, and be prepared to deal with angry voters. Interested? We want you to be a Maryland election judge." As the General Assembly considers how to regain the trust of Marylanders in the way elections are conducted, it would do well to look beyond early voting, paper trails and Diebold machine flaws.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2002
Barry-Wehmiller Cos. Inc., a St. Louis-based holding company, disclosed yesterday that it has signed a letter of intent to acquire United Container Machinery Inc. of Glen Arm, a manufacturer of equipment for the corrugated-box industry. United Container has notified the state Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulations that as part of the transaction, 185 workers could lose their jobs. But the president of United Container said yesterday that he doesn't expect that to happen. "I expect every single employee to cease employment with United Container on July 31 and start working for a new company the next day," said Gregory Landegger, president of United Container, which has been in business for more than 100 years.
NEWS
September 1, 1991
From: Edward HopkinsBel AirAs an individual who is actively involved with public safety, I have concerns with the cover photo displayed on the July 28th edition of the Harford County Sun.The picture displays a mother and son mowing grass while riding upon a medium size farm tractor. The mother is utilizing one hand for steering while the other is holding her sonon her lap. The child is not secured to the seat and the tractor is mowing on an incline.The photographer succeeded in providing a photo that was aesthetically pleasing.
NEWS
October 30, 2006
It has not been a banner week for public confidence in the election process. Reports of past hardware problems in the touch-screen voting machines, the leak of confidential, if outdated, software, and concern over a possible shortage of absentee ballots in certain jurisdictions have caused nearly as much attention to be paid to the mechanics of Election Day as to the candidates whose names will appear on the ballots. But let's set the record straight: Don't buy the hype. Many of these concerns are overstated, and mixed in with the bad news are signs that Nov. 7 could turn out to be a fairly routine Election Day after all. The biggest threat to the election is not that votes will be miscounted but that too many voters will be discouraged from going to the polls.
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