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By Seth Faison Jr. and Seth Faison Jr.,New York Times News Service | March 30, 1992
Orders for American-made machine tools rose 6.4 percent last month from January's level, in another sign of renewed economic growth, according to a report to be released today by an industry trade group.The Association for Manufacturing Technology, calculated February's orders at $231.4 million, up from $217.4 million in January. The amount of February orders was down 5.6 percent, however, from the $245.2 million of February 1991.Together with January's figures, year-to-date orders for machine tools totaled $448.
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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2003
War worries, weakened demand, and plenty of existing production capacity kept manufacturers from spending on new equipment in January as machine tool orders dived 24.9 percent from the previous month - the largest drop since July. Spending on new orders for machine tools fell to $149.7 million in January, compared with $199.4 million in December. Total orders were down 19 percent for the month compared with $184.7 million in January 2002, according to a report yesterday from the American Machine Tool Distributors' Association and the Association for Manufacturing Technology.
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | February 26, 1996
McLEAN, Va. -- Orders for U.S. industrial tools surged during January, the Association for Manufacturing Technology said, suggesting capital investment by businesses continues to boom."
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | December 11, 2002
KENNETH A. Lewis Sr., the best machine-shop student in Southern High School's class of 1958, is painfully aware of the tech crash, the capital investment slump and the recession. Sales at his Baltimore manufacturing company, Kenlee Precision Corp., are down 30 percent. Computer- and telecom-related orders are dead, he says, and he owns perhaps a third more metal-forming machines and other production capacity than he can use. And he could not seem happier about business. "I'm psyched," he says.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | October 19, 1992
Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, one of the nation's most ardent defenders of American-made products, defended her Bush for President campaign director yesterday -- but she also condemned mislabeling practices alleged against a Japanese company he serves as a consultant.The Mazak Corp., one of several foreign firms represented by campaign director Bo Denysyk, is accused of putting "Made In The USA" labels on machine tools manufactured in Japan.Mrs. Bentley, who chairs Bush for President in Maryland, said she would not remove Mr. Denysyk -- as suggested by the Clinton campaign in Maryland and organized labor here.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1990
Machine tool orders riseForeign demand boosted orders for U.S.-made machine tools last month, despite a soft outlook for the domestic manufacturing industry, according to a report released yesterday.October orders rose 1.9 percent from September to $269.3 million, an increase of 31.4 percent from October 1989, said the Association for Manufacturing Technology."The rise in orders indicates that despite gloomy prospects elsewhere in the economy the level of business activity in the manufacturing technology industries remains firm," said association President Albert Moore.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | December 26, 1995
McLEAN, Va. -- Orders for U.S. industrial tools fell 35.4 percent on the month in November, the Association for Manufacturing Technology said today, suggesting U.S. businesses are investing less in plants and equipment.Last month's machine tool orders were at their lowest point since February 1994, about 26.3 percent below November 1994 orders."It's slower than it has been but still healthy," said Ray Stone, managing director of Stone and McCarthy Research Associates in Princeton, N.J. "Those orders remain strong because of an earlier capital spending boom, but that strength is waning a little."
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,TPG Communications | January 6, 1992
One of the best reasons to travel is to get a fresh perspective on one's own backyard. Here are reflections on a recent 10-day trip to London, Prague, Czechoslovakia, and Amsterdam, the Netherlands.Seminar in London. Things have changed. American businessmen used to be seen as gurus here. Now the attitude is, "By what rights do you Americans think you can tell us anything about management?" The fact is, Silicon Valley in California, Austin, Texas, Portland, Ore., and Raleigh-Durham, N.C., are defining the 21st century.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | January 29, 1991
SINCE America began developing the stunningly effective, ultra-high-technology Patriot and Tomahawk missiles, America's hold on global consumer electronics production has shrunk from 70 percent to just 5 percent of world markets. How can American technology be so advanced in the military realm and so retarded commercially?The answer has to do with America's priorities. Where military supremacy is the goal, the government has spared no expense. But where research and deRobertKuttnervelopment aimed at commercial prowess are concerned, not only is there less public subsidy, the entire exercise is considered illegitimate.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | December 11, 2002
KENNETH A. Lewis Sr., the best machine-shop student in Southern High School's class of 1958, is painfully aware of the tech crash, the capital investment slump and the recession. Sales at his Baltimore manufacturing company, Kenlee Precision Corp., are down 30 percent. Computer- and telecom-related orders are dead, he says, and he owns perhaps a third more metal-forming machines and other production capacity than he can use. And he could not seem happier about business. "I'm psyched," he says.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 29, 1996
MCLEAN, Va. -- Orders for U.S. industrial tools rose 18.6 percent in March from the month before, the Association for Manufacturing Technology said today, suggesting that U.S. businesses are investing more in plants and equipment.Last month's orders for machine tools reached their highest level since March of last year."The pace of export order growth accelerated in March, driven primarily by two of our major export markets -- Mexico and China," said association President Albert W. Moore.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | February 26, 1996
McLEAN, Va. -- Orders for U.S. industrial tools surged during January, the Association for Manufacturing Technology said, suggesting capital investment by businesses continues to boom."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | December 26, 1995
McLEAN, Va. -- Orders for U.S. industrial tools fell 35.4 percent on the month in November, the Association for Manufacturing Technology said today, suggesting U.S. businesses are investing less in plants and equipment.Last month's machine tool orders were at their lowest point since February 1994, about 26.3 percent below November 1994 orders."It's slower than it has been but still healthy," said Ray Stone, managing director of Stone and McCarthy Research Associates in Princeton, N.J. "Those orders remain strong because of an earlier capital spending boom, but that strength is waning a little."
BUSINESS
By The Christian Science Monitor | September 4, 1994
CHICAGO -- U.S. manufacturers owe some of the credit for their widely hailed resurgence to the low-profile makers of machine tools.Laboring in the shadows of auto, steel and other manufacturers, small machine-tool workshops provide the essential building blocks for industry. They produce everything from nuts, bolts, and screws to the robots, presses and casters vital to a myriad of manufacturers.After years of painful streamlining, consolidation and technological upgrading, U.S. machine-tool manufacturers are more productive and competitive than they have been for more than two decades, industry executives and analysts say. "There is very little doubt that productivity and efficiency of domestic machine-tool producers has improved dramatically," says Peter Toja, president of Economic Planning Associates Inc., inSmithtown, N.Y.The opportunity for growth for the U.S. industry is also extraordinarily good, industry experts say. With the U.S. economy on the upswing, orders received in 1993 for metal-cutting and metal-forming machine tools surged 33 percent over the previous year.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | April 8, 1993
After several years of recession, things are looking up for the machine tool industry, salesmen said yesterday at Baltimore's first machine tool exhibition in four years.Kevin Kilgallen, a Maryland salesman for Mid-Atlantic Machine Co., blamed the cutbacks at defense contractors such as Westinghouse Electric Corp. for hurting demand for machines that make machines -- generally viewed as a bellwether for American manufacturing as a whole.But now, demand is picking up from some large companies with consumer products, such as Harley-Davidson Inc., which has a factory in York, Pa., and some small local machine shops.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | October 19, 1992
Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, one of the nation's most ardent defenders of American-made products, defended her Bush for President campaign director yesterday -- but she also condemned mislabeling practices alleged against a Japanese company he serves as a consultant.The Mazak Corp., one of several foreign firms represented by campaign director Bo Denysyk, is accused of putting "Made In The USA" labels on machine tools manufactured in Japan.Mrs. Bentley, who chairs Bush for President in Maryland, said she would not remove Mr. Denysyk -- as suggested by the Clinton campaign in Maryland and organized labor here.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | May 28, 1991
Orders for machine tools fell 32.7 percent in April from a year earlier, an industry trade group said in its monthly report. Orders were 5.3 percent lower than in March.In the report released yesterday, the Association for Manufacturing Technology said orders fell last month to $194.7 million. They totaled $205.5 million in March, and $289.3 million in April 1990.For the first four months of the year, orders declined 11.1 percent from the comparable period in 1990, to $845.1 million.Machine tools are power-driven devices that cut or shape metal parts used in all sorts of products, from appliances and automobiles to aircraft and construction materials.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | April 8, 1993
After several years of recession, things are looking up for the machine tool industry, salesmen said yesterday at Baltimore's first machine tool exhibition in four years.Kevin Kilgallen, a Maryland salesman for Mid-Atlantic Machine Co., blamed the cutbacks at defense contractors such as Westinghouse Electric Corp. for hurting demand for machines that make machines -- generally viewed as a bellwether for American manufacturing as a whole.But now, demand is picking up from some large companies with consumer products, such as Harley-Davidson Inc., which has a factory in York, Pa., and some small local machine shops.
BUSINESS
By Seth Faison Jr. and Seth Faison Jr.,New York Times News Service | March 30, 1992
Orders for American-made machine tools rose 6.4 percent last month from January's level, in another sign of renewed economic growth, according to a report to be released today by an industry trade group.The Association for Manufacturing Technology, calculated February's orders at $231.4 million, up from $217.4 million in January. The amount of February orders was down 5.6 percent, however, from the $245.2 million of February 1991.Together with January's figures, year-to-date orders for machine tools totaled $448.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,TPG Communications | January 6, 1992
One of the best reasons to travel is to get a fresh perspective on one's own backyard. Here are reflections on a recent 10-day trip to London, Prague, Czechoslovakia, and Amsterdam, the Netherlands.Seminar in London. Things have changed. American businessmen used to be seen as gurus here. Now the attitude is, "By what rights do you Americans think you can tell us anything about management?" The fact is, Silicon Valley in California, Austin, Texas, Portland, Ore., and Raleigh-Durham, N.C., are defining the 21st century.
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