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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 30, 1995
WASHINGTON -- It is the strangest of international relationships: The United States has kept more than 500 troops in Macedonia to protect it and has considered the dispatch of thousands more, but still refuses to treat the former Yugoslav republic like a full-fledged country.The U.S. troops are there, but there has never been an American ambassador. There is also no agreement between the United States and Macedonia on the country's name.This odd relationship is the result of a bitter history involving Macedonia and Greece and the political influence wielded by Greece's supporters in Washington, including Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes of Maryland.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 4, 2008
BUCHAREST, Romania -- NATO countries unanimously endorsed Bush administration plans for installing a missile defense system in alliance countries in Europe yesterday even as they rebuffed President Bush's entreaties to extend membership of the alliance to the former Soviet republics of Ukraine and Georgia. The unusually rancorous meeting of NATO members in Bucharest exposed sharp differences between nations, but despite the rancor Bush won some agreement on bolstering the number of NATO troops in Afghanistan and presenting a united front against Russia's objections on the issue of missile defense.
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NEWS
By Louise Branson | August 29, 2001
WASIHNGTON - The mission of 3,500 NATO troops in Macedonia, including Americans, is billed as short and simple - disarm ethnic Albanian rebels and leave in 30 days. Instead, it is a perilous enterprise that is ill-thought-through and almost certainly destined for failure. Yes, a peace treaty has been signed. The ethnic Albanians say they will hand over their weapons on a tandem track as the Macedonians in this tiny country enact laws to give them more rights. Will that happen? Almost anyone on the ground will reply with a resounding no. The violence and ethnic hatreds have already pushed too far. The situation is much like that in Bosnia as the shelling of Sarajevo began.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporters | November 27, 2007
The Rev. Marvis P. May walked the streets near Lafayette Square, delivering a message of hope and encouragement throughout some of West Baltimore's toughest streets. Pastor of Macedonia Baptist Church for nearly two decades, he died Saturday at Union Memorial Hospital of undetermined causes, church officials said. He was 47. "He was born to preach and, in my estimation, was one of the most gifted preachers I've ever known," said the Rev. A.C.D. Vaughn, pastor of Sharon Baptist Church.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 2, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Facing the prospect of renewed, wider fighting in the former Yugoslavia this spring, the Clinton administration is considering placing more American troops -- possibly thousands -- in Macedonia to prevent the war from spreading through the whole Balkan region, officials said yesterday.The possibility that a substantial contingent of U.S. troops may be deployed to Macedonia was disclosed by Anthony Lake, President Clinton's national security adviser, who emphasized that dispatching troops was only one course of action under review.
NEWS
By R. C. Longworth and R. C. Longworth,Chicago Tribune | May 15, 1993
SKOPJE, Macedonia -- The prospect of sending U.S. forces to Macedonia -- as President Clinton has suggested -- raises much less anxiety here than in other places in the Balkans.But the view from here is that it may be only a matter of time before the fires of the Balkan civil war set Macedonia ablaze."And when that happens, it would mean without doubt a new Balkan war," said Risto Nikovski, Macedonia's under secretary for foreign affairs. "Bosnia is basically a civil war. Here, five or six countries would be involved.
NEWS
By Ljubica Z. Acevska | June 14, 2001
WASHINGTON - Then-President George H.W. Bush warned Yugoslav leader Slobodan Milosevic in December 1992 that the United States will take steps to prevent violence spreading into Macedonia and Kosovo. This statement was repeated in February 1993 by then-Secretary of State Warren Christopher at the outset of the Clinton administration. Such a ringing and unequivocal statement is needed again. While U.S. support and involvement have played an important role in Macedonia's remaining peaceful and stable for nearly 10 years, a strong U.S. commitment is necessary today to ensure the peace.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | June 11, 1993
ATHENS, Greece -- Seeking to demonstrate that the Clinton (( administration will continue to lead the NATO alliance, Secretary of State Warren Christopher said that the United States would send 300 troops to the former Yugoslav republic of Macedonia to guard against a widening of the Balkan war.The conflict in Bosnia "must not be allowed to spill over," Mr. Christopher told NATO foreign ministers, who opened two days of talks yesterday morning at this sun-soaked...
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Staff Writer | July 13, 1993
SKOPJE, Macedonia -- The main contingent of 300 U.S. troops landed here yesterday, about as far from harm's way as it is possible to get in the war-torn Balkans, but carrying ""TC message that the conflict shall spread no further.The troops chosen to deliver President Clinton's message symbolized the movement from the Cold War to its tumultuous aftermath, because the 196 U.S. infantry troops who landed here were from the Berlin Brigade, who for decades guarded the Cold War flash point along the Berlin Wall.
NEWS
By Louise Branson and Louise Branson,Special to The Sun | June 9, 1994
ARNAQI, Macedonia -- In the seedy Kafe Bar Berlin, Essmerelda Seferi throws back her head and croons in a husky Edith Piaf voice. Hard-drinking men leer across the smoke-filled room.To Essmerelda, this hell in a dirt-track town is the end of her young life. When she was 14, she was sold to a man who took her virginity, sold her to others and then discarded her. That was two years ago.She longs to return home to Albania and her parents. "In my dreams at night, I see how my mother cries," she says, her own eyes brimming with tears.
NEWS
June 2, 2007
On May 29, 2007, JOHN H., beloved husband of Dolores A. Clayborne. He is also survived by an adopted brohter-in-law, Leslie Byrd, two aunts, Earline Ford and Flossie Johnson, three nieces, five godchildren, cousins, Macedonia Church family, other relatives and friends. Friends may visit the JAMES A. MORTON & SONS FUNERAL HOMES, INC., 1701 Laurens Street, Sunday 2-6 P.M. Funeral services will be held Monday at Macedonia Baptist Church, 718 W. Lafayette Avenue. The family will receive friends 10:30-11 A.M. Funeral services will begin at 11 A.M.
NEWS
January 7, 2007
On January 3, 2007, LINWOOD L.; beloved husband of the late Sarabel Gittings-Johnson; devoted father of Linda Johnson-Smithwick. Also survived by one granddaughter, Dana M. Arif, one son-in-law Ronald Smithwick; one sister Harriet Butler; one brother in law Elder Jake Butler, Sr.; a host of nieces, nephews other relatives and friends. Friends may call at the CHATMAN-HARRIS FUNERAL HOME, 5240 Reisterstown Road, Sunday, 12 to 6 P.M. The family will receive friends at the Macedonia Baptist Church, Fremont and Lafayette Avenue, Monday, 10:30 A.M. Funeral Services will begin 11 A.M. Interment Arbutus Memorial Park.
NEWS
By CHRISTOPHER DELISO | May 10, 2006
SKOPJE, MACEDONIA -- Averting a humanitarian catastrophe was NATO's stated justification for bombing Serbia and its Kosovo province in 1999. But initial successes quickly succumbed to the reverse ethnic cleansing of more than 200,000 Serbs and other minorities by Albanian militants. Now, despite seven years of U.N. policing and donor largess, Kosovo's remaining minorities still live in fear, and the economy and infrastructure remain in shambles. Behind their faM-gade of optimism, Western leaders negotiating Kosovo's future status are panicking.
NEWS
March 18, 2006
On March 10, 2006, JAMES E. FORD, SR., retired employee of Bethlehem Steel; devoted husband of Earline Ford and loving father of James E. Jr., Robert L. and Sheila M. Ford; also survived by other relatives and friends. Mr. Ford will lie instate on Friday, from 4 to 7pm at Macedonia Baptist church, 716 W. Lafayette Avenue with Wake Services from 7 to 9pm. On Saturday, a Family Hour on Satureday at at Macedonia from 11-11:30 A.M. when Funeral Service will begin. Interment Woodlawn Cemetery.
NEWS
June 9, 2005
On June 5, 2005, WESTLEY BATON JOHNSON, beloved husband of Dolores F. Johnson, devoted father of Sharif and Kevin Johnson, loving brother of Louis Johnson and Clara Howard. Also survived by seven grandchildren, one great-grandchild, one special friend of 60 years, Joe Diggs and a host of other relatives and friends. Visitation at 2140 N. Fulton Ave on Thursday 3 to 5 P.M., viewing until 8 P.M. The family will receive friends at Macedonia Baptist Church, 718 W. Lafayette Ave. on Friday at 10 A.M. Funeral at 11 A.M.
NEWS
May 25, 2004
On May 20, 2004, RITA S. ANDERSON, devoted mother of Tanya R. Claggett. She is also is survived by one sister Arlene Drummond, two brothers Howard and Gerald Gaines, son-in-law Danen S. Claggett, two grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. On Wednesday friends may call THE NEW VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES (RANDALLSTOWN), 8728 Liberty Rd. from 3 to 8 P.M. On Thursday, Mrs. Anderson will lie in state at Macedonia Baptist Church, 718 W. Lafayette Ave., where the family will receive friends from 10 to 11 A.M. with services to follow.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 1999
KUKES, Albania -- Heavy rain pelted refugees crossing into Albania and Macedonia throughout the morning yesterday, and blasting winds ripped the plastic sheeting many tried to use as shields, as the swell of exiles continued under a protracted Serbian campaign of "ethnic cleansing."In Albania, international relief agencies struggled vainly to keep up with the growing numbers of people and vehicles, as the day's intake of refugees neared 20,000. Fewer than 3,000 refugees entered Macedonia at two border crossings by nightfall yesterday, compared with more than 12,000 who entered from Kosovo on Thursday and Friday.
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