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NEWS
November 4, 2013
The National Players will perform "Macbeth" in the Chesapeake Theater on Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 7:30 p.m. For an ambitious couple gripped with murderous thoughts, reality proves to be elastic. Witches, floating daggers, moving forests and blood that refuses to wash away – who can tell what is real and what is imagined? Shakespeare's twisted tale examines the brutal consequences of unchecked ambition. Tickets are $10 to $16 and are available at tickets.harford.edu, the HCC Ticket Office in the Chesapeake Center or by calling 443-412-2211.
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NEWS
November 4, 2013
The National Players will perform "Macbeth" in the Chesapeake Theater on Wednesday, Nov. 20 at 7:30 p.m. For an ambitious couple gripped with murderous thoughts, reality proves to be elastic. Witches, floating daggers, moving forests and blood that refuses to wash away – who can tell what is real and what is imagined? Shakespeare's twisted tale examines the brutal consequences of unchecked ambition. Tickets are $10 to $16 and are available at tickets.harford.edu, the HCC Ticket Office in the Chesapeake Center or by calling 443-412-2211.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The city's eclectic theater scene includes DIY-style troupes that cleverly carve out spaces for themselves, sometimes in unlikely spots. Consider the case of Baltimore Annex Theater. Most folks passing the long-deserted New York Fried Chicken store at the corner of North Charles Street and North Avenue would probably not think, "What a cool spot for a theater. " The Annex team saw precisely that possibility. After a lot of clawing away at the remnants of the fast food emporium and a lot of waiting for city permits, the company's new home, dubbed -- what else?
NEWS
August 2, 2013
President Barack Obama should be ridiculed for his failure to do what he was hired to do - create jobs and lead the country out of its present mess which has gotten worse under his watch ("A minimum step forward," July 30). Instead, he chooses to blame it on President George W. Bush, take lavish vacations and travel overseas at the drop of a hat, play golf and make speeches. William Shakespeare had it correct in Macbeth when he described a tale "full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 24, 1997
Clocking in at under two hours, the Baltimore Shakespeare Festival's "Macbeth" is a lean but less-than-mean killing machine.It's less than mean primarily because actor Neal Moran never fully conveys the unbridled homicidal ferocity of Macbeth's ambition. He's more a plodding than a plotting Macbeth.Granted, it's supposed to take some convincing on Lady Macbeth's part to get him to embark on his bloody deeds, and Moran's performance does get stronger after Macbeth is crowned. But in the early going, when Kristin Bennett's determined Lady Macbeth urges him to "screw your courage to the sticking point," he looks at her with the passionless expression of a middle manager stuck in a dull business $H meeting.
NEWS
By Geraldine Segal | March 10, 1994
Verdi's "Macbeth" opens Saturday at the Lyric, featuring Baltimore-born bass James Morris and the Baltimore Opera.Here, a Baltimore opera buff's irreverent account of the action, with apologies to Shakespeare and Verdi. Warning: If you don't know how this tragedy comes out, stop reading now.Three groups of witches on a heath appearWith prophecies for Macbeth that he's eager to hear.He'll become Thane of Cawder and then Scotland's king.Banquo will father royalty; that's the news that they bring.
NEWS
By Lois Burdett | November 28, 1999
Editor's note: This excerpt from Shakespeare's play about the misguided nobleman explores Macbeth's pivotal meeting with three witches who can see into the future.Macbeth sat brooding, his thoughts far away. "The Thane of Fife didn't come today.I wonder if he's hatching some plot.My spies will discover what I cannot.Tomorrow I'll meet the witches three, and ask what they can predict for me."The sisters were hidden in a cavern deep;Around the cauldron, they did creep.With their hands so crinkled with time,They stirred a stinking putrid slime.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 19, 1995
Evil is at the bloody heart of Shakespeare's great tragedy, "Macbeth," and the central scenic image in the Shakespeare Theatre's production is a heart -- or, more precisely, a tree shaped like a heart with veins and arteries for branches.Is Macbeth -- intriguingly and intensely played by Stacy Keach -- evil at heart? Or, once exposed to evil, does it spread through his veins like a disease?Keach adopts the disease model, showing us a man who, as he and his wife explain in the banquet scene with Banquo's ghost, has long suffered from "a strange infirmity."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 14, 1995
It is especially significant that all of the characters -- except the title character -- are represented by puppets in Stuffed Puppet Theatre's fascinating production of "Macbeth!"On the most obvious level, this offers a showcase for a solo tour-de-force performance by puppeteer Neville Tranter. On a deeper level, since Tranter also portrays the power-hungry Scot, it sets up a contrast between human being and puppets -- a contrast that leads to the realization that, in the end, Macbeth has less humanity than the puppets.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 1996
With "local Shakespeare," you know in advance there will be a drop-off in talent between the gifted few and the well-intentioned but less-seasoned many.As the current Colonial Players of Annapolis presentation of "Macbeth" reminds us, this is most apparent in ensemble scenes where the poetic flow is compromised by the interplay of such unevenly matched characters and voices.But, if I may mix words and plays, I come not to bury Colonial's "Macbeth" but to praise it.For despite inevitable moments of turbulence in the talent pool, there was some remarkable acting, a lot of sure-handed direction and a succession of intensely drawn, downright spooky dramatic moments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The city's eclectic theater scene includes DIY-style troupes that cleverly carve out spaces for themselves, sometimes in unlikely spots. Consider the case of Baltimore Annex Theater. Most folks passing the long-deserted New York Fried Chicken store at the corner of North Charles Street and North Avenue would probably not think, "What a cool spot for a theater. " The Annex team saw precisely that possibility. After a lot of clawing away at the remnants of the fast food emporium and a lot of waiting for city permits, the company's new home, dubbed -- what else?
FEATURES
By Rachel Martin and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Starving and freezing on a garbage dump behind her owner's home, Sophia was only able to walk on her hind legs when she was rescued. Next week, she will star in the Shakespearan play "Macbeth," assuming the role of "Man's Best Friend. " Thanks to the Baltimore Humane Society, homeless dogs and cats will have the opportunity to star in famous productions throughout the year with The Baltimore Shakespeare Factory. The acting company is helping to get these animals adopted, giving them a full-page "actor's bio" in the playbill and providing the Baltimore Humane Society with an information table at each show.
NEWS
May 14, 2009
On May 12, 2009, Arthur Wilbur Brown A graveside service will be held on Friday at Franklin Memorial Park in Rocky Mount, VA. Arrangements by the CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF ESSEX. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Don MacBeth Memorial Jockey Fund, P.O. Box 18470, Encino, CA 91416 or at www.macbethfund.org.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2008
The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company's production of Macbeth will make your heart pound, and not just when Macbeth wields bloody daggers after murdering Duncan, or when Banquo rises, eerily, from the dead. Like other CSC productions, Macbeth is staged at the skeletal ruins of the Patapsco Female Institute, set on an appropriately spooky Ellicott City hilltop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 9, 2008
For the next four nights, the legendary Macbeth, long-deceased high king of Scotland, will stride about Woolly Mammoth Theatre's stage with Homer Simpson and Barack Obama. MacHomer, the 70-minute solo show that Rick Miller, a Canadian actor, has been performing on and off for the past 13 years, is always a delightfully bizarre concoction. Only Miller would bring audiences the Bard's spooky, 11th-century tale of murder and ambition as narrated by more than 50 characters from The Simpsons.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2007
"Double, double toil and trouble;/Fire, burn; and, caldron, bubble." The Chesapeake Shakespeare Company is presenting Macbeth through Dec. 2 at Howard County Center for the Arts. In the public mind, the three witches have almost become comic characters. Stirring their steaming brew and chanting their imprecations, they are ideal subjects for comedy sketches and magazine cartoons, not to mention informal gags at the kitchen range. But if an audience can immerse itself in the idea that people in Shakespeare's dark, savage Scotland believe seriously in mystic forces that can shape their lives and forecast their destinies, the play will unfold in all its power.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | March 14, 1994
The Baltimore Opera Company "Macbeth" that was unveiled Saturday evening earns fairly high marks on musical and vocal grounds but can't even manage a "gentleman's C" on the way it looks.This was James Morris' first attempt at the title role, and the Baltimore-born and -bred bass-baritone performed it handsomely indeed. Macbeth is a role that is usually performed by a true baritone, and singers of Morris' voice type usually are heard in the role of Banquo, a role that Morris has performed with great success in the past.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 30, 2000
Center Stage's production of Shakespeare's "Macbeth" emphasizes the play's violence and bloodshed. Yet even this focus on the visceral never truly grabs you in the gut. The most successful scenes in this loud, and at times crude, production are those involving the witches. In these supernatural interludes, director Tim Vasen's interpretation takes on a vitality and fascination often lacking in the rest of the evening. Admittedly, crudeness, noise and blood aren't bad choices for a play about 11th-century Scottish warriors.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | November 5, 2007
Yesterday, William Shakespeare slipped into Jessup's Patuxent Institution. The Bard made his way through the security gate, then traveled down several long halls of the red-brick, maximum-security prison, before stepping inside the cinderblock walls of a gym that would serve as a temporary Globe Theatre. One of his most notorious characters trudged in behind him: Macbeth. Patuxent inmates and their guests spent yesterday afternoon watching the schemes of the ambitious, murderous Scottish lord -- many for the first time -- as performed by the Ellicott City-based Chesapeake Shakespeare Company.
NEWS
October 14, 2007
The State Highway Administration is set to begin an $8.5 million construction project to improve safety and ease congestion for more than 30,000 drivers along Route 32 (Sykesville Road) between Route 26 (Liberty Road) and Macbeth Way/Piney Branch Parkway in Eldersburg. Weather permitting, the half-mile project should be completed by fall next year. As a county priority, the Carroll commissioners contributed $2.4 million to move the project forward. The project includes the installation of a full traffic signal at Route 32 and Macbeth Way to improve safety and help facilitate enhanced access to Route 32 between Macbeth Way and Piney Ridge Parkway.
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