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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 19, 1999
BEIJING -- Near a stretch of beach on Macau's island of Coloane sits Fernando's, a small, Portuguese restaurant with red-checked tablecloths, pitchers of sangria and some of the tastiest garlic prawns in South China. At midnight tonight, Macau -- the last Western colony in Asia -- will return to Chinese rule after more than four centuries under Portuguese control. And while restaurant owner Fernando Gomez will miss his country's red and green flag flying over the governor's mansion, he is looking forward to other changes.
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SPORTS
By Eric Meany, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Maryland alumnus Justin Benedik enjoyed a successful trip to the recently completed 12th World Wushu Championships in Malaysia, finishing fourth in compulsory changquan (long fist), 15th in gun shu (staff) and 32nd in dao shu (broadsword) last weekend. It was the first appearance in the world championships for Benedik, 27, who competed despite being hampered by a stress fracture in his sacroiliac joint and a sports hernia. "The competition was a great experience," Benedik said.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 16, 1999
MACAU -- For 442 years, Portuguese officials have ruled this spit of land on the southeast coast of China. Yesterday, Macau got its first Chinese leader. A committee appointed by Beijing chose a local banker, Edmund Ho, to administer the colony after it reverts to Chinese rule in December.Ho's ascension had been widely expected here. He is the de facto leader of Macau's Chinese business community and has close, long-standing ties to the Chinese government.The lack of suspense was palpable as the 199 committee members -- a lone Portuguese among them -- filed to the front of a wood-paneled auditorium and deposited their ballots in a box. After 30 minutes of counting, Ho was declared the winner with 82 percent of the vote.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 22, 2012
Last Friday, Paul Ryan, the presumptive Republican vice presidential nominee, made the most populist speech of this campaign season. "It's the people who are politically connected, it's the people who have access to Washington that get the breaks," he told an enthusiastic crowd of more than 2,000 at a high school gym in Virginia. "Well, no more. We don't want to pick winners and losers in Washington. ... Hardworking taxpayers should be treated fairly, and it should be based on whether they're good, whether they work hard and not who they know in Washington.
FEATURES
By Kara Kenna | May 15, 1994
Adventures in kayakingEnjoy the outdoors with kayaking and rafting vacation packages to Idaho and Ottawa offered by Adventure Schools. The trip to Idaho costs $1,400 and runs from July 9 through July 17. It features kayaking with raft support, and rafting on the Salmon and Snake rivers. The Salmon River is the longest free-flowing river in the continental United States and runs through some breathtaking canyons. The trip to Ottawa ($800) runs from Aug. 13 through Aug. 20 and is for kayakers only.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 22, 2012
Last Friday, Paul Ryan, the presumptive Republican vice presidential nominee, made the most populist speech of this campaign season. "It's the people who are politically connected, it's the people who have access to Washington that get the breaks," he told an enthusiastic crowd of more than 2,000 at a high school gym in Virginia. "Well, no more. We don't want to pick winners and losers in Washington. ... Hardworking taxpayers should be treated fairly, and it should be based on whether they're good, whether they work hard and not who they know in Washington.
SPORTS
By Eric Meany, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Maryland alumnus Justin Benedik enjoyed a successful trip to the recently completed 12th World Wushu Championships in Malaysia, finishing fourth in compulsory changquan (long fist), 15th in gun shu (staff) and 32nd in dao shu (broadsword) last weekend. It was the first appearance in the world championships for Benedik, 27, who competed despite being hampered by a stress fracture in his sacroiliac joint and a sports hernia. "The competition was a great experience," Benedik said.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 20, 1999
MACAU -- China took back possession of Macau from Portugal yesterday, vowing that Taiwan would be next in line for reunification with the mainland.Reclaiming Macau after 442 years of Portuguese rule, President Jiang Zemin explicitly linked the turnover to Chinese expectations that Taiwan soon would agree to be ruled by China under the same "one country, two systems" formula applied to Hong Kong and Macau.The successful return of Macau and Hong Kong has given China "the confidence and ability to solve the Taiwan issue by an early date and realize China's complete reunification," Jiang told 2,500 dignitaries gathered in a giant tent on reclaimed land jutting into the South China Sea.The ceremony, modeled on the 1997 handover of Hong Kong, marked the end of European colonialism in Asia and Portugal's departure from its first and last colony.
NEWS
By BARBARA DEMICK and BARBARA DEMICK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2006
MACAU -- For decades, this former Portuguese colony was renowned as a haunt of counterfeiters, drug runners and spies. Banks here handled millions of dollars on behalf of North Korea's government, which long has been accused by the United States of selling illegal drugs to raise hard currency. The nation's founder, Kim Il Sung, and his son, current leader Kim Jong Il, allegedly kept their ill-gotten gains in Macau. But now the welcome mat has been rolled up and the North Koreans, who didn't have many friends to begin with, find themselves distinctly unwelcome in this autonomously governed Chinese territory.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 2007
SEOUL, South Korea -- North Korea said it would begin shutting down its main nuclear reactor within a day of retrieving about $25 million that had been frozen in a Macau bank because of U.S. sanctions, Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico said yesterday. North Korea also offered to admit United Nations nuclear inspectors for the first time in more than four years, said Richardson, after an official visit to North Korea and a meeting with senior officials there. Fulfilling those offers would resolve North Korea's long dispute with the U.S. Treasury.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 2007
SEOUL, South Korea -- North Korea said it would begin shutting down its main nuclear reactor within a day of retrieving about $25 million that had been frozen in a Macau bank because of U.S. sanctions, Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico said yesterday. North Korea also offered to admit United Nations nuclear inspectors for the first time in more than four years, said Richardson, after an official visit to North Korea and a meeting with senior officials there. Fulfilling those offers would resolve North Korea's long dispute with the U.S. Treasury.
NEWS
By Bob Drogin and Mark Magnier and Bob Drogin and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 15, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration removed a key stumbling block to the nuclear disarmament of North Korea by agreeing yesterday to the release of North Korean funds frozen in a Macau bank linked to illicit weapons and money laundering. The decision by the Treasury Department clears the way for Chinese monetary authorities in Macau to return to North Korea as much as $25 million in funds held at the Banco Delta Asia. The freeze, imposed after U.S. authorities blacklisted the bank in September 2005 as a "primary money laundering concern," so angered the North Korean regime that it refused to participate in nuclear arms talks for more than a year.
NEWS
By BARBARA DEMICK and BARBARA DEMICK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2006
MACAU -- For decades, this former Portuguese colony was renowned as a haunt of counterfeiters, drug runners and spies. Banks here handled millions of dollars on behalf of North Korea's government, which long has been accused by the United States of selling illegal drugs to raise hard currency. The nation's founder, Kim Il Sung, and his son, current leader Kim Jong Il, allegedly kept their ill-gotten gains in Macau. But now the welcome mat has been rolled up and the North Koreans, who didn't have many friends to begin with, find themselves distinctly unwelcome in this autonomously governed Chinese territory.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 20, 1999
MACAU -- China took back possession of Macau from Portugal yesterday, vowing that Taiwan would be next in line for reunification with the mainland.Reclaiming Macau after 442 years of Portuguese rule, President Jiang Zemin explicitly linked the turnover to Chinese expectations that Taiwan soon would agree to be ruled by China under the same "one country, two systems" formula applied to Hong Kong and Macau.The successful return of Macau and Hong Kong has given China "the confidence and ability to solve the Taiwan issue by an early date and realize China's complete reunification," Jiang told 2,500 dignitaries gathered in a giant tent on reclaimed land jutting into the South China Sea.The ceremony, modeled on the 1997 handover of Hong Kong, marked the end of European colonialism in Asia and Portugal's departure from its first and last colony.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 19, 1999
BEIJING -- Near a stretch of beach on Macau's island of Coloane sits Fernando's, a small, Portuguese restaurant with red-checked tablecloths, pitchers of sangria and some of the tastiest garlic prawns in South China. At midnight tonight, Macau -- the last Western colony in Asia -- will return to Chinese rule after more than four centuries under Portuguese control. And while restaurant owner Fernando Gomez will miss his country's red and green flag flying over the governor's mansion, he is looking forward to other changes.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 16, 1999
MACAU -- For 442 years, Portuguese officials have ruled this spit of land on the southeast coast of China. Yesterday, Macau got its first Chinese leader. A committee appointed by Beijing chose a local banker, Edmund Ho, to administer the colony after it reverts to Chinese rule in December.Ho's ascension had been widely expected here. He is the de facto leader of Macau's Chinese business community and has close, long-standing ties to the Chinese government.The lack of suspense was palpable as the 199 committee members -- a lone Portuguese among them -- filed to the front of a wood-paneled auditorium and deposited their ballots in a box. After 30 minutes of counting, Ho was declared the winner with 82 percent of the vote.
NEWS
By Bob Drogin and Mark Magnier and Bob Drogin and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 15, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration removed a key stumbling block to the nuclear disarmament of North Korea by agreeing yesterday to the release of North Korean funds frozen in a Macau bank linked to illicit weapons and money laundering. The decision by the Treasury Department clears the way for Chinese monetary authorities in Macau to return to North Korea as much as $25 million in funds held at the Banco Delta Asia. The freeze, imposed after U.S. authorities blacklisted the bank in September 2005 as a "primary money laundering concern," so angered the North Korean regime that it refused to participate in nuclear arms talks for more than a year.
NEWS
By Jennifer Lin and Jennifer Lin,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1997
MACAU -- Macau is what Hong Kong is not.Hong Kong is fast, modern and brash, a world-class commercial center, blessed with one of the best deep-water ports in the world. Macau, a Portuguese-run enclave an hour away by ferry, got an airport only two years ago. It has just built its first skyscraper -- the 40-story headquarters for the Bank of China. Hong Kong makes its living off trade and international finance; Macau, from casinos and a tawdry nightlife.But the two places have one very significant thing in common.
NEWS
By Jennifer Lin and Jennifer Lin,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1997
MACAU -- Macau is what Hong Kong is not.Hong Kong is fast, modern and brash, a world-class commercial center, blessed with one of the best deep-water ports in the world. Macau, a Portuguese-run enclave an hour away by ferry, got an airport only two years ago. It has just built its first skyscraper -- the 40-story headquarters for the Bank of China. Hong Kong makes its living off trade and international finance; Macau, from casinos and a tawdry nightlife.But the two places have one very significant thing in common.
FEATURES
By Kara Kenna | May 15, 1994
Adventures in kayakingEnjoy the outdoors with kayaking and rafting vacation packages to Idaho and Ottawa offered by Adventure Schools. The trip to Idaho costs $1,400 and runs from July 9 through July 17. It features kayaking with raft support, and rafting on the Salmon and Snake rivers. The Salmon River is the longest free-flowing river in the continental United States and runs through some breathtaking canyons. The trip to Ottawa ($800) runs from Aug. 13 through Aug. 20 and is for kayakers only.
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