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By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 22, 1998
A few months ago I needed to upgrade from a 486/33 system. I ended up with a Motorola Power Mac clone system.Windows 3.1 seems to have keyboard commands that I haven't found on Mac OS, such as pressing Alt+Tab to toggle between open applications and Ctrl+Esc to open the task list to select an open application. Is there a way to accomplish this on the Mac without leaving the keyboard? Also, is there a way to access the menus from the keyboard to use commands that don't have keyboard equivalents?
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Stevenson has already beaten one of two teams that shared last year's Middle Atlantic Conference title and will go for the sweep with a visit to Lycoming on Saturday. The Mustangs (4-0, 3-0 in the league) defeated Lebanon Valley, 20-14, two weeks ago, but coach Ed Hottle admitted that tangling with the Warriors, who have won 15 league championships, is the litmus test of the season. “They're the big dog in the conference,” Hottle said Wednesday. “They're the defending conference champion, and they're the team we aspire to be. They're perennially very good in the conference, they're well-coached, they're big and physical, they don't make mistakes.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Stevenson has already beaten one of two teams that shared last year's Middle Atlantic Conference title and will go for the sweep with a visit to Lycoming on Saturday. The Mustangs (4-0, 3-0 in the league) defeated Lebanon Valley, 20-14, two weeks ago, but coach Ed Hottle admitted that tangling with the Warriors, who have won 15 league championships, is the litmus test of the season. “They're the big dog in the conference,” Hottle said Wednesday. “They're the defending conference champion, and they're the team we aspire to be. They're perennially very good in the conference, they're well-coached, they're big and physical, they don't make mistakes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Carol A. MacPhail, who had been an administrator and art teacher at Friends School and Bryn Mawr School, died Wednesday of breast cancer at her Lutherville home. She was 71. The daughter of Norbert Albert Witt, who had been president of Noxell, and Cecile R. Porter Witt, a homemaker, the former Carol Ann Witt was born in Detroit. She spent her early years in Evanston, Ill., and Greenwich, Conn., before moving to Homeland in 1954 with her family. She was a 1961 graduate of Friends School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from the University of Maryland, College Park and a master's degree in 1977 in fine arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art . In 1989, she earned a master's degree in guidance and counseling from the Johns Hopkins University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 21, 2001
Whenever I make my semiannual recommendations to PC shoppers, I get calls and messages from Apple Macintosh owners asking why I don't mention their favorite computer. There are a couple of reasons. One is that Macs account for only 5 percent of the desktop computer market (Apple's own figure). Of those customers, a sizable chunk are professional designers and artists at the high end, and schools at the low end. As a general-purpose consumer PC, the Mac really doesn't make much of an impact.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | May 11, 1997
I GOT AN impassioned letter this week from a reader who wanted to know why I don't write more about Macintosh computers.After extolling the virtues of the Mac, he described an assortment of woes that had beset unlucky friends cursed with computers running Microsoft operating systems.He said many of his troubled peers found inner peace after switching to the Mac, which he called the perfect computer for "a very prevalent group in our society: the computer illiterate. The really computer illiterate."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,Sun Staff | June 21, 1999
When Apple releases a new upgrade to the Mac OS, it usually means a smorgasbord of new and improved features, as well as the obligatory bug fixes.While Mac OS 8.6 does offer improvements, it isn't a major event. Then again, this upgrade is free to those already using Mac OS 8.5 or 8.5.1. As with OS 8.5, this operating system works only on Power Macs.The biggest improvement is invisible: a new "nanokernel," the core code of the operating system. While this enhances stability (the last few bits of code remaining from the days of pre-Power Macs have been expunged)
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,Staff Writer | May 12, 1993
Western Maryland College completed its final Middle Atlantic Conference season this month. The Green Terrors will become part of the newly formed 11-team Centennial Conference.Western Maryland completes its MAC tenure with 22 team titles. Baseball led the way with eight, including a string of five Southern Division crowns beginning in 1966. The football team captured the first title for the Terrors in 1962 and won again the following year.The volleyball team won from 1976 to 1980. Juniata has won every year since.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | June 9, 2005
HOW DO you think members of a congregation would feel if their minister stood up one Sunday and announced that he was embracing Satan? No different from the way many Apple customers felt this week when CEO Steve Jobs told the company's most faithful acolytes - the folks who develop its software - that future versions of the Macintosh operating system would run on Intel processors. And with that, he tried to slap a bear hug on Intel's CEO, Paul Otellini. Jobs has, of course, spent years trashing Intel's processors as slow, unwieldy, underperforming pieces of electronic detritus better suited to running a dishwasher than a computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zeiler and David Zeiler,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1998
Fun, stable and brimming with useful features, the latest revision of Apple's venerable Macintosh operating system offers much to tempt users to upgrade.According to Apple, OS 8.5 contains more than 70 new features, so many I haven't found them allYou should know right off the bat that OS 8.5's requirements include a PowerPC processor, so Macs based on the old Motorola 68K CPUs can't handle it. You will also need, Apple says, at least 16 MB of physical RAM, with Virtual Memory set to at least 24 MB.With each OS revision, Apple has replaced more of the code designed for its original processors with code that's native to the new PowerPC chip.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
A law professor who is teaching Maryland's public defenders to better serve their poor clients amid "crushing" caseloads is among the winners of this year's MacArthur Foundation "genius" grants. As founder of the Atlanta-based organization Gideon's Promise, Jonathan Rapping works to train public defenders and help reform what he considers civil rights abuses in the criminal justice system. He arrived in Baltimore in May for a year-long stint at the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, his first attempt at changing a statewide system.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 28, 2014
Baltimore Ravens fans might have another reason to cheer for a sack of the opposing teams' quarterbacks this season -- free Big Macs. McDonald's is offering the promotion through its McD App mobile app. Mac for Sacks kicks in when the Ravens defense makes a sack for the first time in the game. All McD App users in the Baltimore area will be notified and get a digital coupon to redeem for a Big Mac the next day. The promotion applies at participating McDonald's restaurants and is valid through 11:59 p.m. the day after the game.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Allen Grossman,a prize-winning poet who spent 15 years teaching his craft to students at the Johns Hopkins University, died June 27 at his home in Chelsea, Mass. He was 82 and had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease. "Allen was an inimitable instructor," said Douglas Basford, assistant director of composition at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, and a former student of Dr. Grossman's at Hopkins. Remembering a class he audited in poetry and poetics, Mr. Basford recalled the instructor "probing and prodding to get, as he did in his critical prose, to the core of how a poem worked [and]
SPORTS
By Katie Carrera, The Washington Post | May 27, 2014
After a monthlong search, the Washington Capitals have decided who will be the next to lead them behind the bench and in the front office. Washington named Brian MacLellan general manager and Barry Trotz coach Monday, giving the organization familiarity and experience, respectively, as it aims to usher in a new era. MacLellan, 55, has been a fixture in Washington for the past 13 seasons, serving first as a pro scout, then director of player personnel...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
Gordon F. "Mac" McNamara Sr., the personable Budeke's paint salesman and manager who was known to legions of his Fells Point customers as "Broadway Mac," died Tuesday in his sleep at his Towson home. He was 85. Gordon Francis McNamara Sr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Durham Street. He attended city public schools and went to work at a young age to help support his family while his two brothers were away fighting during World War II. Mr. McNamara enlisted in the Army in 1950 and served in Korea in the infantry, where he was awarded three Bronze Stars, family members said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
Patrick Mullins, who helped spark Maryland's run to the NCAA tournament final in December, captured his second straight MAC Hermann Trophy on Friday night. Mullins became the first Terp and seventh player overall to claim back-to-back Hermann honors, which are awarded to the best player in Division I soccer. Maryland lost to Notre Dame in the title game, but Mullins posted 46 points on 19 goals and eight assists. The points and goals are tied for the fifth-highest single-season marks in program history.
NEWS
September 22, 2004
On September 20, 2004 ROBERT CHARLES, of Reisterstown. Husband of Mangala Dutta Mac Donald. Father of Rukmini and Kenneth Mac Donald. Son of Carter and Mary Kuhlman Mac Donald. Brother of John, James and Stephen Mac Donald. A Memorial Service will be held on Friday at 7 P.M. at Christ the King Lutheran Church, 515 Academy Ave., Reisterstown. Arrangements by Pritts Funeral Home and Chapel, Westminster.
NEWS
May 15, 2005
On Tuesday, May 10, 2005, DAVIDTERRENCE Mac HAMER, of Annapolis, MD and Vienna, VA, passed away at his home with his family by his side. Beloved husband of Jo Ann Mac Hamer; loving father of David Mac Hamer, Jennifer Mac Hamer-Overholser (James), Bradley Mac Hamer and Sara Barnette; brother of Barbara Stricklin, Carol Mac Hamer, Thomas Mac Hamer (Babette) and Jeff Mac Hamer (Lessandra); uncle of Brendan, Diana and Grant. A native of Baltimore, MD, he graduated from the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and served in the Vietnam War, where he was a recipient of the Bronze Star.
NEWS
December 13, 2013
Sad news as first reported by DCRTV.com as long-time 'It's Academic' host Mac McGarry passed away yesterday at the age of 87. McGarry hosted both the Baltimore and Washington versions of the show for decades. I was a contestant on the show in both my junior and senior years at Chesapeake High in Pasadena, and I remember him being a friendly gentleman who was genuinely enthusiastic about getting the opportunity to present an educational show that spotlighted high school students.
NEWS
By Lauren Wiseman and The Washington Post | December 13, 2013
Mac McGarry, the avuncular TV quizmaster of “It's Academic” who spent several decades pitching teenage contestants in Baltimore and Washington fastball trivia questions about topics as diverse as Shakespeare, Michelangelo, Chubby Checker and the chemical makeup of paint, died of pneumonia Thursday at his home in Potomac. He was 87.  With an easygoing baritone that sounded like a throwback to the days of fedoras and big bands, Mr. McGarry thrived well into the Internet age. As host of “It's Academic,” which launched in Washington in 1961 and became the longest-running quiz program in TV history, he liked to describe himself as the area's most inquisitive man. A Washington radio and TV personality, he carved a multifaceted career spanning six decades.
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