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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 22, 1993
A huge audience tuned in to see the final episode of "Cheers" Thursday night. But it wasn't nearly enough to challenge the 1983 finale of "M*A*S*H" as the most-watched TV show ever.A.C. Nielsen measured the audience for the 90-minute-plus "Cheers" episode at a 45.5 rating and 64 share. By comparison, the final "M*A*S*H" episode had a 60.2 rating and 77 share. (A ratings point currently represents 931,000 TV households; shares are the percentage of sets in use.)After seeing the ratings, NBC announced yesterday it will rerun the final episode tomorrow night at 7 (locally on WMAR-Channel 2)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
Robert Altman barged into the nation's consciousness during the Vietnam War era with the anti-war comedy "M*A*S*H" (1970), guiding a huge ensemble — with fresh stars like Donald Sutherland and Elliott Gould — through freewheeling improvisations. The movie was set during the Korean War, but '70s audiences knew it was commenting on the bloody chaos of Vietnam. Seen today, in a new 35mm print at the AFI Silver Theatre, it remains uproarious and profound about the way human beings develop a tough humor and forge unexpected bonds to stay sane amid the human wreckage of combat.
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FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | November 25, 1991
ON AND OFF THE AIR:* Here's a question that is not going to be answered by tonight's last nostalgia-fest show on CBS, "Memories of 'M*A*S*H' " (at 9:30, Channel 11): Why have so few regulars from the popular 11-season series returned to TV with anything approaching regularity?When, for example, was the last time you saw Gary Burghoff (Radar O'Reilly) in anything? It might have been those computer firm ads he and some of the other "M*A*S*H" gang did a few years back.The post-war years have not meant unemployment for everybody, of course.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik | February 9, 2010
The Nielsen Co. estimates that Sunday's Super Bowl game between the New Orleans Saints and Indianapolis Colts was seen by 106.5 million people, making it the most-watched program in TV history, topping the 1983 finale of "M A S H." The "M A S H" finale was seen by 105.97 million viewers - but that was a time in TV history when there were far fewer TV sets and homes. The previous Super Bowl record was 98.7 million viewers for last year's game between Arizona and Pittsburgh. While snowbound viewers in Mid-Atlantic cities such as Baltimore and Washington surely played some role in the new record, it was not a major one, according to analysts who attributed the huge audience to the "compelling narrative" of the underdog Saints coming from behind against the favored Colts much as the city of New Orleans itself came back from Hurricane Katrina.
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 1998
THE FRANCIS Scott Key High drama department will present "M*A*S*H," a play based on the movie and long-running television comedy, tomorrow and Saturday in the school auditorium.The curtain rises at 8 p.m. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for students and seniors.Information: 410-751-3320.Charter discussionThe Taneytown Chamber of Commerce meets Monday at the American Legion Hall at Broad Street and Roberts Mill Road.Networking begins at 6 p.m., and dinner is served at 6: 30 p.m. or you can just drop by for The meeting begins at 7: 05 p.m.Speaking will be Carmen Amedori and Jim Reter from the Committee for Citizens for Anti-Charter Government will speak.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK | September 22, 2002
Hotlips Houlihan had the body of a Venus, but no idea how to use it. That's certainly not true of Loretta Swit's newest role -- as the principal narrator of The Vagina Monologues, which comes to the Mechanic Theatre this week for eight performances. Eve Ensler's show is based on 200 interviews with a diverse group of women from around the globe that are touching, bawdy and funny. The monologues are delivered by three actresses (Swit and two New York based-performers, Starla Benford and Kristen Lee Kelly)
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | November 12, 1990
Remember "In the Beginning"?"Hello, Larry" ring any bells?If not, not to worry. Even McLean Stevenson, the man who lived through them, prefers to forget many of the ill-conceived sitcoms he's starred in since leaving "M*A*S*H" 15 years ago."I did some terrible shows," he says. "But nobody made me do it. I did everything by choice. I love working."Which brings up the question: What exactly has life after "M*A*S*H" been like for the 59-year-old actor?Ask Mr. Stevenson that on a rainy Saturday and he not so much answers as recounts his life in show business.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 9, 2003
Never trust anything you see on television about television. I don't know if it's ignorance, laziness, a hopeless addiction to hype or a pathological inability to tell the truth about itself, but TV almost never gets it right when revisiting its past. The A&E cable channel's popular show Biography, which typically features famous personalities, this week focuses instead on television. Part of a series called Cult TV Week, tomorrow night's program showcases M*A*S*H, the dark comedy about life in a medical unit during the Korean War. Biography's take on the landmark series gets too many things wrong to enumerate.
NEWS
April 12, 2000
Larry Linville, 60, best known for his portrayal of the neurotic Maj. Frank Burns on the CBS television show "M*A*S*H," died Monday in New York of complications of pneumonia. He suffered from cancer and had a lung removed in 1998 after a tumor was discovered. Mr. Linville was part of a breakout cast that made "M*A*S*H" one of the longest-running shows on television. He starred with Alan Alda, Gary Burghoff, Wayne Rogers and Loretta Swit. The show, through both comedy and stark political commentary, detailed life at the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, where Mr. Linville's whiny, power-hungry Burns was smitten with nurse Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan, played by Ms. Swit.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 13, 1991
An NBC ad campaign says that if you liked "M*A*S*H," you'll like "Nurses."Right.Why not compare it to Ernest Heminway's "A Farewell to Arms"? That had nurses in it, too.A medical setting is about the only thing "Nurses," which premieres at 9:30 Saturday night on WMAR-TV (Channel 2), shares with "M*A*S*H." As for differences, there are many. The main one is that "M*A*S*H" was funny, smart and often moving; "Nurses," on the other hand, is all attitude and no insight.The first three jokes in the premiere, for example, are about lepers, constipation and a patient's sleeping in his own stool.
NEWS
By JOHN ANDERSON and JOHN ANDERSON,NEWSDAY | March 19, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- There's that old Canadian joke," Donald Sutherland is saying, "about the Brit, the Frenchman and the Canadian, who are going to be executed. And they're given a last wish. The Brit says he'd like a cup of tea with milk and sugar. The Canadian says he'd like 15 minutes to talk about Canadian identity. And the Frenchman says he'd like to be shot before the Canadian." Sutherland, who has played his share of iconic Americans -- Hawkeye Pierce in Robert Altman's M*A*S*H, the father in Ordinary People, the pot-befogged professor in Animal House and, right now, nefarious House speaker Nathan Templeton in TV's Commander in Chief -- is himself Canadian.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 9, 2003
Never trust anything you see on television about television. I don't know if it's ignorance, laziness, a hopeless addiction to hype or a pathological inability to tell the truth about itself, but TV almost never gets it right when revisiting its past. The A&E cable channel's popular show Biography, which typically features famous personalities, this week focuses instead on television. Part of a series called Cult TV Week, tomorrow night's program showcases M*A*S*H, the dark comedy about life in a medical unit during the Korean War. Biography's take on the landmark series gets too many things wrong to enumerate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK | September 22, 2002
Hotlips Houlihan had the body of a Venus, but no idea how to use it. That's certainly not true of Loretta Swit's newest role -- as the principal narrator of The Vagina Monologues, which comes to the Mechanic Theatre this week for eight performances. Eve Ensler's show is based on 200 interviews with a diverse group of women from around the globe that are touching, bawdy and funny. The monologues are delivered by three actresses (Swit and two New York based-performers, Starla Benford and Kristen Lee Kelly)
NEWS
April 12, 2000
Larry Linville, 60, best known for his portrayal of the neurotic Maj. Frank Burns on the CBS television show "M*A*S*H," died Monday in New York of complications of pneumonia. He suffered from cancer and had a lung removed in 1998 after a tumor was discovered. Mr. Linville was part of a breakout cast that made "M*A*S*H" one of the longest-running shows on television. He starred with Alan Alda, Gary Burghoff, Wayne Rogers and Loretta Swit. The show, through both comedy and stark political commentary, detailed life at the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, where Mr. Linville's whiny, power-hungry Burns was smitten with nurse Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan, played by Ms. Swit.
NEWS
September 5, 1999
TOOLIK LAKE, Alaska -- The last days of summer are rapidly fading here in the land of the midnight sun, 160 miles above the Arctic Circle, spurring a frenzy by animals and plants alike to prepare for the hyperborean winter's nine-month onslaught.Also racing against the clock to finish their field work are dozens of international scientists at this remote research site, searching for small pieces that could fit into the puzzle of global warming.With an urgency that drives 18-hour workdays (much less tiring under the 24-hour sun)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1999
You can bet at least one thought was racing through George Clooney's mind as he walked off the set of "ER" for the last time:"Please, God, don't let me be another McLean Stevenson."Poor McLean. He's destined to go down in history as the poster boy for bad career moves. There he was in 1975, with a co-starring role on a hit series ("M*A*S*H") and the TV world pretty much at his feet, and he decided to strike out on his own.The result: A series of numbingly bad sitcoms and instant obscurity.
FEATURES
By Hap Erstein and Hap Erstein,Cox News Service | April 24, 1995
Loretta Swit owes her two Emmy Awards to Maj. Margaret Houlihan, the feisty head nurse role she played for 11 years on television's highly acclaimed series, "M*A*S*H." It is the part that brought her into America's living rooms and afforded her a measure of celebrity. People often associate her with "Hot Lips," which drives her a little batty.Ask her how she feels about getting stuck in the public's consciousness as a member of the "M*A*S*H" ensemble and the actress' tone turns decidedly icy. "How can I answer that question?
SPORTS
June 11, 1995
Steve Garvey injures his thumb on July 29, ending his consecutive-games streak at a National League- record 1,207.* George Brett has a home run taken away for having pine tar on his bat more than 18 inches from the knob on July 24 against the New York Yankees.* LaMarr Hoyt goes 13-0 the second half to win the American League Cy Young Award.* Gaylord Perry, Carl Yastrzemski and Johnny Bench all retire.* The Brooklyn Bridge turns 100.* Chicago and Philadelphia elect African-American mayors.
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 1998
THE FRANCIS Scott Key High drama department will present "M*A*S*H," a play based on the movie and long-running television comedy, tomorrow and Saturday in the school auditorium.The curtain rises at 8 p.m. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for students and seniors.Information: 410-751-3320.Charter discussionThe Taneytown Chamber of Commerce meets Monday at the American Legion Hall at Broad Street and Roberts Mill Road.Networking begins at 6 p.m., and dinner is served at 6: 30 p.m. or you can just drop by for The meeting begins at 7: 05 p.m.Speaking will be Carmen Amedori and Jim Reter from the Committee for Citizens for Anti-Charter Government will speak.
NEWS
November 12, 1997
Margaret Harshaw,88, a soprano and mezzo-soprano who sang at the Metropolitan Opera for 22 seasons, died Friday in Libertyville, Ill.Francis I. Linn,78, died of lymphatic cancer Sunday, days after he was re-elected to a fourth term as mayor of Gettysburg, Pa.Annie Dodge Wauneka,87, a longtime Navajo Nation leader who won the Freedom Medal, the United States' highest civilian honor, for work against tuberculosis, died Monday in Flagstaff, Ariz.H. Richard Hornberger,73, a surgeon whose novel inspired the movie and television series "M*A*S*H," died Nov. 4 in Portland, Maine.
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