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June 4, 1995
Actress Lynn Redgrave will come to Tudor Hall in Bel Air on Saturday to participate in a conference examining the evolution of Shakespearean productions in the United States since the time of the Booth family.The Preservation Association for Tudor Hall (PATH) will conduct the conference, "The Discovered Country: America and the Classical Acting Tradition," beginning at noon at Tudor Hall, the homestead of the Booths, a theatrical family.Junius Brutus Booth, an English-born Shakespearean actor, settled in Harford County in 1822.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 25, 2006
The Producers [Universal] $29.98 The movie version of Mel Brooks' hit Broadway production of The Producers did not repeat the Tony winner's phenomenal success in theaters, although the stage show based on Brooks' 1968 comedy is still ensconced at the St. James Theater on the Great White Way. Reviews for the movie were decidedly mixed when it was released last Christmas, and the film was a commercial disappointment as well -- even though several members...
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | April 27, 2004
Awarm day in late April: Crabapple branches scribbled in purple. A temporary tattoo drawn delicately on a young arm. Toenails painted the colors of tulips. Life is budding both outside and within Richard Pilcher's classroom in the Baltimore School for the Arts. Fifteen juniors lean forward to catch actress Lynn Redgrave's every word as she critiques their interpretations of some of Shakespeare's most famous characters: Lysander from A Midsummer Night's Dream, Kate from The Taming of the Shrew and Lord Capulet from Romeo and Juliet.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | April 27, 2004
Awarm day in late April: Crabapple branches scribbled in purple. A temporary tattoo drawn delicately on a young arm. Toenails painted the colors of tulips. Life is budding both outside and within Richard Pilcher's classroom in the Baltimore School for the Arts. Fifteen juniors lean forward to catch actress Lynn Redgrave's every word as she critiques their interpretations of some of Shakespeare's most famous characters: Lysander from A Midsummer Night's Dream, Kate from The Taming of the Shrew and Lord Capulet from Romeo and Juliet.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 15, 1991
Here's an inside tip: This year's Emmy for best dramatic actress in a made-for-TV movie will go to Lynn Redgrave for her performance in ABC's remake of "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" at 9 p.m. Sunday on WJZ-TV (Channel 13).The story of two sisters, who live together very unhappily ever after their screen careers are over, was first done in 1962 as a feature film.The original had Bette Davis playing the role of thetormenting sister, Baby Jane Hudson, with Joan Crawford as the older, wheelchair-bound Blanche.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 3, 1994
The most moving sections of Lynn Redgrave's one-woman show, "Shakespeare for My Father," aren't by Shakespeare. They occur when the actress discusses her feelings for her father.Her father was the late Sir Michael Redgrave -- an actor himself, as well as the son, father and grandfather of actors. (Lynn's sister is Vanessa and her niece is Natasha Richardson, all actresses of considerable repute.)Lynn Redgrave's feelings for her father are so intense -- running the gamut from fearful to conflicted to accepting -- it's difficult to believe she's willing to re-live them night after night.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 1, 1999
``Gods and Monsters'' takes as its narrative engine the mysterious death of director James Whale in 1957 and the events that may have led up to it.A strange little film that speculates that Whale befriended a strapping young man, tried to woo him, and finally implicated him in his own suicide, ``Gods and Monsters'' features an extraordinary performance by Ian McKellen as the self-invented Whale. It also connects in a fascinating way his most famous movie -- ``The Bride of Frankenstein'' -- and the trauma he suffered in World War I.Still, an oddly misplaced temporal sense keeps ``Gods and Monsters'' from being the gripping story it should be. Director Bill Condon has carefully reconstructed Whale's gorgeous California home, but contemporary feeling still suffuses the film, which is set in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and SUN FILM CRITIC | January 1, 1999
"Gods and Monsters" takes as its narrative engine the mysterious death of director James Whale in 1957 and the events that may have led up to it.A strange little film that speculates that Whale befriended a strapping young man, tried to woo him, and finally implicated him in his own suicide, "Gods and Monsters" features an extraordinary performance by Ian McKellen as the self-invented Whale. It also connects in a fascinating way his most famous movie -- "The Bride of Frankenstein" -- and the trauma he suffered in World War I.Still, an oddly misplaced temporal sense keeps "Gods and Monsters" from being the gripping story it should be. Director Bill Condon has carefully reconstructed Whale's gorgeous California home, but contemporary feeling still suffuses the film, which is set in the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 25, 2006
The Producers [Universal] $29.98 The movie version of Mel Brooks' hit Broadway production of The Producers did not repeat the Tony winner's phenomenal success in theaters, although the stage show based on Brooks' 1968 comedy is still ensconced at the St. James Theater on the Great White Way. Reviews for the movie were decidedly mixed when it was released last Christmas, and the film was a commercial disappointment as well -- even though several members...
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | February 14, 1991
"I think you're really going to be blown away by the whole project," John Glover said of his latest film, "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?" "But you're really going to get your socks knocked off by Lynn."This re-make of the 1962 Bette Davis-Joan Crawford film is the first professional collaboration between Lynn Redgrave and her sister, Vanessa. They play two sisters, Jane and Blanche Hudson, faded movie stars dancing a macabre Hollywood waltz."She was really into this role," Glover, a Salisbury native and Towson State University graduate, said over the phone from Los Angeles, noting that the woman best known these days for her Weight Watchers commercials wore padding to give former child star Jane an over-the-hill frumpy look.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 1, 1999
``Gods and Monsters'' takes as its narrative engine the mysterious death of director James Whale in 1957 and the events that may have led up to it.A strange little film that speculates that Whale befriended a strapping young man, tried to woo him, and finally implicated him in his own suicide, ``Gods and Monsters'' features an extraordinary performance by Ian McKellen as the self-invented Whale. It also connects in a fascinating way his most famous movie -- ``The Bride of Frankenstein'' -- and the trauma he suffered in World War I.Still, an oddly misplaced temporal sense keeps ``Gods and Monsters'' from being the gripping story it should be. Director Bill Condon has carefully reconstructed Whale's gorgeous California home, but contemporary feeling still suffuses the film, which is set in the 1950s.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and SUN FILM CRITIC | January 1, 1999
"Gods and Monsters" takes as its narrative engine the mysterious death of director James Whale in 1957 and the events that may have led up to it.A strange little film that speculates that Whale befriended a strapping young man, tried to woo him, and finally implicated him in his own suicide, "Gods and Monsters" features an extraordinary performance by Ian McKellen as the self-invented Whale. It also connects in a fascinating way his most famous movie -- "The Bride of Frankenstein" -- and the trauma he suffered in World War I.Still, an oddly misplaced temporal sense keeps "Gods and Monsters" from being the gripping story it should be. Director Bill Condon has carefully reconstructed Whale's gorgeous California home, but contemporary feeling still suffuses the film, which is set in the 1950s.
NEWS
June 4, 1995
Actress Lynn Redgrave will come to Tudor Hall in Bel Air on Saturday to participate in a conference examining the evolution of Shakespearean productions in the United States since the time of the Booth family.The Preservation Association for Tudor Hall (PATH) will conduct the conference, "The Discovered Country: America and the Classical Acting Tradition," beginning at noon at Tudor Hall, the homestead of the Booths, a theatrical family.Junius Brutus Booth, an English-born Shakespearean actor, settled in Harford County in 1822.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 1, 1995
In the 30 years since Vanessa Redgrave first dazzled Americans as the loopy rich girl ditching an impossible husband in "Morgan!", this English actress often seemed to be living at cross-purposes. She would win raves for her performances, then lose jobs with her support for unpopular causes.In the late 1980s, she became a shadow in newspapers and magazines by demanding that reporters agree not to ask her about politics, as if there were two Vanessa Redgraves whose passions remained strangers, perhaps enemies.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 3, 1994
The most moving sections of Lynn Redgrave's one-woman show, "Shakespeare for My Father," aren't by Shakespeare. They occur when the actress discusses her feelings for her father.Her father was the late Sir Michael Redgrave -- an actor himself, as well as the son, father and grandfather of actors. (Lynn's sister is Vanessa and her niece is Natasha Richardson, all actresses of considerable repute.)Lynn Redgrave's feelings for her father are so intense -- running the gamut from fearful to conflicted to accepting -- it's difficult to believe she's willing to re-live them night after night.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | July 14, 1991
CHICAGO -- Lynn Redgrave -- 5 feet 10, slim, saying she wears a size 8, that she's kept 35 pounds off since 1982, but drawing the line at saying how much she weighs -- is working the room at the Mayfair Regent Hotel.It's 4 p.m., teatime, and the assembled women (and three men) who paid to listen to Ms. Redgrave are nibbling on crustless little sandwiches, scones and English toffee (everything is low-calorie except the scones), taking pictures of Ms. Redgrave with one-touch cameras, asking her questions about her life, her weight, her diet and her astrological sign (Pisces)
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 1, 1995
In the 30 years since Vanessa Redgrave first dazzled Americans as the loopy rich girl ditching an impossible husband in "Morgan!", this English actress often seemed to be living at cross-purposes. She would win raves for her performances, then lose jobs with her support for unpopular causes.In the late 1980s, she became a shadow in newspapers and magazines by demanding that reporters agree not to ask her about politics, as if there were two Vanessa Redgraves whose passions remained strangers, perhaps enemies.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | July 14, 1991
CHICAGO -- Lynn Redgrave -- 5 feet 10, slim, saying she wears a size 8, that she's kept 35 pounds off since 1982, but drawing the line at saying how much she weighs -- is working the room at the Mayfair Regent Hotel.It's 4 p.m., teatime, and the assembled women (and three men) who paid to listen to Ms. Redgrave are nibbling on crustless little sandwiches, scones and English toffee (everything is low-calorie except the scones), taking pictures of Ms. Redgrave with one-touch cameras, asking her questions about her life, her weight, her diet and her astrological sign (Pisces)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 15, 1991
Here's an inside tip: This year's Emmy for best dramatic actress in a made-for-TV movie will go to Lynn Redgrave for her performance in ABC's remake of "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" at 9 p.m. Sunday on WJZ-TV (Channel 13).The story of two sisters, who live together very unhappily ever after their screen careers are over, was first done in 1962 as a feature film.The original had Bette Davis playing the role of thetormenting sister, Baby Jane Hudson, with Joan Crawford as the older, wheelchair-bound Blanche.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | February 14, 1991
"I think you're really going to be blown away by the whole project," John Glover said of his latest film, "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?" "But you're really going to get your socks knocked off by Lynn."This re-make of the 1962 Bette Davis-Joan Crawford film is the first professional collaboration between Lynn Redgrave and her sister, Vanessa. They play two sisters, Jane and Blanche Hudson, faded movie stars dancing a macabre Hollywood waltz."She was really into this role," Glover, a Salisbury native and Towson State University graduate, said over the phone from Los Angeles, noting that the woman best known these days for her Weight Watchers commercials wore padding to give former child star Jane an over-the-hill frumpy look.
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