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By Michael Pakenham | November 18, 2001
Reaching for Glory: Lyndon Johnson's Secret White House Tapes, 1964-1965, edited by Michael R. Beschloss (Simon & Schuster, 495 pages, $30). This is the second volume of the most illuminating document to come out of the tragic and triumphant presidency of Lyndon Johnson. Beschloss is -- as he was in Taking Charge -- patient and impassioned, even-handed but dramatically focused as explores the transcripts of LBJ conversations, many of them recorded without the knowledge of the other speakers.
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Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | April 7, 2013
"I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them. " - Thomas Jefferson My recent column on the challenges associated with the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program elicited numerous and very personal stories from readers about how individual (disabled) recipients depended on the program for daily maintenance. And, many asked, how dare I (and others of my ilk) question such a vital program?
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By THEO LIPPMAN JR | June 12, 1991
ATTORNEY GENERAL Richard Thornburgh is running for a 7/8 Senate seat in Pennsylvania but refuses to quit his job.AHis critics say this compromises the non-political administration of justice. His defenders say, Robert Kennedy set the precedent in 1964.Now there's an inspiring justification! Bobby Kennedy never, ever mixed politics with justice, right?Some Kennedy defenders say it's different, that he, unlike Thornburgh, remained in the Justice Department only a few days after deciding to run for the Senate in New York.
NEWS
By ART PINE.. and ART PINE..,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2005
Former U.S. Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy, whose surprisingly strong showing in the 1968 New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary dramatized deepening public opposition to the Vietnam War and effectively ended President Lyndon B. Johnson's political career, died yesterday. He was 89. Mr. McCarthy, a Democrat who represented Minnesota, died at a retirement home in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C., where he had lived for several years. A relatively obscure senator who turned sour on the war as the United States escalated its troop buildup in the mid-1960s, Mr. McCarthy entered the New Hampshire primary partly to fill a vacuum: More prominent anti-war politicians, assuming that Mr. Johnson was unbeatable, had decided not to run against him. Mr. McCarthy's candidacy was initially dismissed as hopelessly quixotic.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 27, 1995
I COMMENTED here Monday on Bob Dole's turning 72 and the problems that created for his presidential bid.Now the Manchester (N.H.) Union Leader has brought up his other longevity problem:"Dole. . . is too old for the Presidency. . . in the sense that his ways of functioning in Washington are old," it editorialized yesterday. What do you expect? He's been functioning in the Senate for 26 years.No one who functioned 26 years in the Senate was ever elected president. In fact, functioning senators of any tenure seldom get nominated, much less elected.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 13, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - The New Deal of Franklin D. Roosevelt may be long buried, but you wouldn't have known it had you stumbled upon a retrospective here the other day of the life of Minnesota's most beloved politician, the late Hubert Horatio Humphrey. His old protege and fellow member of the vice presidents' club, Walter Mondale, gathered hundreds of old Democrats and even some Republicans to recall "Hubert" in the highs and lows of his long public career. The result was an overflow of nostalgia, many laughs and some tears as Mr. Mondale and other old Humphrey associates told stories about him at the University of Minnesota center named for him. Mr. Mondale called his old colleague "our nation's most effective apostle of the active use of government as an instrument of social justice since Franklin Roosevelt."
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 19, 1996
&TC The United States has failed to bring vast numbers of its citizens into full citizenship. I have no patience with those who put aside those failures as hopelessly intractable, as matters of practical inevitability. That sort of resignation, however, seems to me today to be the preponderant consensus among Democrats and Republicans alike.It was not ever thus.Exactly a third of a century ago, the United States rose up as a moral nation. Led by men and women of amazing courage and decency, it wrestled with its own soul on the precipice of massive violence, on the very edge of something that could have approached civil war. In agony and joy and indomitable determination, it wrought a civil rights revolution.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 5, 1995
When you talk to Carol Channing, you don't just speak with Carol, or even Dolly. You also talk to Tallulah Bankhead, Marlene Dietrich, Lyndon Johnson and, if you're lucky, Winnie the Pooh -- who sounds a lot like Winston Churchill.It's not that the actress suffers from a multiple personality disorder. It's that she's an expert mimic, and in addition to her own trademark gravelly voice, the voices of figures from her past have a way of popping up in the conversation.The figure she is most closely associated with, of course, is Dolly -- and rightly so. The actress has played the meddlesome matchmaker more than 4,000 times.
NEWS
By James J. Kilpatrick | November 16, 1990
CARL ROWAN'S autobiography came in the mail the other day. It is a cracking good book, destined for best-seller ranking, and it tells a story that would have enchanted Harry Golden.Golden, you may recall, was the editor, publisher and sole proprietor of the Carolina Israelite. He delighted in tales of success that could happen ''only in America.'' Carl Rowan's life provides an inspiring example of what Harry Golden wrote about.It is impossible, Carl remarks, for Americans under the age of 50 to understand the world into which he was born in 1925.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | May 10, 1993
IS America all but ungovernable? Or is Bill Clinton bunglin his attempt to govern it? Or are we judging him too harshly too soon?Yes, yes and yes.The Constitution, let's recall, created political deadlock by design. Our political institutions, with their separation of powers and protection of minority views, make presidential activism difficult and hence rare.In living memory, only two presidents have effectively harnessed government for activist economic purposes -- Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson.
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | June 15, 2004
CHICAGO - When I was a lad, my family spent a couple of summer vacations at a pleasant lake in central Texas called Granite Shoals. But in 1965, during the prime of my boyhood, it was renamed for a local product who had risen to the White House - Lyndon Johnson. It became Lake LBJ. From a distinctive, well-loved name that evoked the natural terrain of the region to a charmless label advertising a major politician - it wasn't my idea of progress. The change had the odd effect of not only increasing my dislike of Mr. Johnson but reducing my affection for the lake.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 18, 2001
Reaching for Glory: Lyndon Johnson's Secret White House Tapes, 1964-1965, edited by Michael R. Beschloss (Simon & Schuster, 495 pages, $30). This is the second volume of the most illuminating document to come out of the tragic and triumphant presidency of Lyndon Johnson. Beschloss is -- as he was in Taking Charge -- patient and impassioned, even-handed but dramatically focused as explores the transcripts of LBJ conversations, many of them recorded without the knowledge of the other speakers.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 13, 2001
MINNEAPOLIS - The New Deal of Franklin D. Roosevelt may be long buried, but you wouldn't have known it had you stumbled upon a retrospective here the other day of the life of Minnesota's most beloved politician, the late Hubert Horatio Humphrey. His old protege and fellow member of the vice presidents' club, Walter Mondale, gathered hundreds of old Democrats and even some Republicans to recall "Hubert" in the highs and lows of his long public career. The result was an overflow of nostalgia, many laughs and some tears as Mr. Mondale and other old Humphrey associates told stories about him at the University of Minnesota center named for him. Mr. Mondale called his old colleague "our nation's most effective apostle of the active use of government as an instrument of social justice since Franklin Roosevelt."
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | October 19, 1997
As a young reporter in the middle 1960s, I saw a lot of Lyndon Johnson and worked hard at trying to like him. I failed, though I came to respect him profoundly. The fact that the Vietnam war then grew to dominate his consciousness, to define his administration, and to consume the U.S. government and people is one of the premier tragedies of American history.Had it not been for Vietnam, Johnson might have been one of the toweringly great presidents.He was the only president in the 20th century to have endured true poverty - gut hunger - as a child.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | May 19, 1996
&TC The United States has failed to bring vast numbers of its citizens into full citizenship. I have no patience with those who put aside those failures as hopelessly intractable, as matters of practical inevitability. That sort of resignation, however, seems to me today to be the preponderant consensus among Democrats and Republicans alike.It was not ever thus.Exactly a third of a century ago, the United States rose up as a moral nation. Led by men and women of amazing courage and decency, it wrestled with its own soul on the precipice of massive violence, on the very edge of something that could have approached civil war. In agony and joy and indomitable determination, it wrought a civil rights revolution.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 27, 1995
I COMMENTED here Monday on Bob Dole's turning 72 and the problems that created for his presidential bid.Now the Manchester (N.H.) Union Leader has brought up his other longevity problem:"Dole. . . is too old for the Presidency. . . in the sense that his ways of functioning in Washington are old," it editorialized yesterday. What do you expect? He's been functioning in the Senate for 26 years.No one who functioned 26 years in the Senate was ever elected president. In fact, functioning senators of any tenure seldom get nominated, much less elected.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | May 14, 1992
IN THE good old murder-mystery days the butler did it. Yet he still hasn't even been hauled in for questioning in the Los Angeles case. He's the only one who hasn't.In the past week practically everybody has accused practically everybody else of doing it. Here are just a few of the accusations, with learned comment:1. Lyndon Johnson did it. Though he died in 1973, Johnson cannot hide behind his decease to avoid trial. Long-dead presidents are constantly being tried and convicted for perpetrating situations that defeated us just this morning.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | January 13, 1992
Paris -- Oliver Stone's new movie on the Kennedy assassination contends that had Kennedy lived he would have given us a decade of peace. The enemies of peace -- arms manufacturers, CIA, Pentagon, who knows else -- had him killed because they wanted war.This is the conspiratorial interpretation of history at its most childish, but also expresses a belief in the providential man in politics -- the hero who could have changed everything had he only survived....
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 5, 1995
When you talk to Carol Channing, you don't just speak with Carol, or even Dolly. You also talk to Tallulah Bankhead, Marlene Dietrich, Lyndon Johnson and, if you're lucky, Winnie the Pooh -- who sounds a lot like Winston Churchill.It's not that the actress suffers from a multiple personality disorder. It's that she's an expert mimic, and in addition to her own trademark gravelly voice, the voices of figures from her past have a way of popping up in the conversation.The figure she is most closely associated with, of course, is Dolly -- and rightly so. The actress has played the meddlesome matchmaker more than 4,000 times.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | May 10, 1993
IS America all but ungovernable? Or is Bill Clinton bunglin his attempt to govern it? Or are we judging him too harshly too soon?Yes, yes and yes.The Constitution, let's recall, created political deadlock by design. Our political institutions, with their separation of powers and protection of minority views, make presidential activism difficult and hence rare.In living memory, only two presidents have effectively harnessed government for activist economic purposes -- Franklin Roosevelt and Lyndon Johnson.
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