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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
POTOMAC -- OK, let's cut to the chase: Yes, Lynda Carter spent a lot of years living down Wonder Woman. But that's all in the past; right now, she's pretty happy with herself, her career and her legacy, and that includes a three-year stint as television's most bodacious post-feminist superhero."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
With word coming out of Hollywood last week that "Friday Night Lights" actress Adrianne Palicki has been cast to play Wonder Woman in a coming TV series, fans of the Amazing Amazon have only one question: "Will she really be able to compare with Lynda Carter?" For three seasons, from 1975-1979, Carter played the DC Comics heroine, earning legions of fans both female (who appreciated her guts) and male (who appreciated her beauty — Carter had, after all, won the Miss World USA pageant and been a semifinalist for the 1972 Miss World title)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2011
With word coming out of Hollywood last week that "Friday Night Lights" actress Adrianne Palicki has been cast to play Wonder Woman in a coming TV series, fans of the Amazing Amazon have only one question: "Will she really be able to compare with Lynda Carter?" For three seasons, from 1975-1979, Carter played the DC Comics heroine, earning legions of fans both female (who appreciated her guts) and male (who appreciated her beauty — Carter had, after all, won the Miss World USA pageant and been a semifinalist for the 1972 Miss World title)
ENTERTAINMENT
By M.G. Lord and By M.G. Lord,Special to the Sun | November 19, 2000
"Wonder Woman: The Complete History," by Les Daniels. Chronicle. 206 pages. $29.95. Had the editors of Ms. magazine been able to read Les Daniels' fascinating, thoroughly researched "Wonder Woman," they might not have been so quick to nominate the female superhero for president. Nor would they necessarily have placed her on the cover of the magazine's debut issue in July 1972. Because of his erratic personal life, Wonder Woman's "father," William Moulton Marston, who created the Amazonian warrior in 1941, would not have held up under voter scrutiny.
NEWS
February 12, 1997
George W. DeFranceaux II,83, a retired mortgage banker and developer who helped establish a corporation that encouraged private investment in housing for people with low and moderate incomes, died Jan. 27 in Lafayette, La., his home in recent years.From 1969 to 1983, Mr. DeFranceaux played a leading role at the National Corporation for Housing Partnerships, a private, for-profit company created by Congress. He later owned and managed Waterfront Homes, a real estate business on Maryland's Eastern Shore, and was chief executive of First Mortgage Services of Easton.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 23, 1991
If it's true that you can tell a lot about a society by its celebrities, what does it say about us that Patrick Duffy is ZTC becoming one of our biggest stars?This is something we should worry about, I think.Duffy's new sitcom, "Step by Step," is the second highest-rated new show of the season, and tonight at 9 (Channel 2) NBC trusts him to carry Danielle Steele's "Daddy" against game four of the World Series on CBS.While Duffy is surprisingly good at comedy on "Step by Step," he is not much of a dramatic actor.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | December 1, 1995
WHEN LARRY King gives a party, there are few regrets. He's expecting more than 400 people to attend "An Evening With Larry King and Friends" this evening at the Four Seasons Hotel in Washington.The party is a benefit for the Larry King Cardiac Foundation, established by King in 1988 to provide money for people, who, due to limited means and insurance, would be otherwise unable to receive a heart transplant.Last year's gala raised more than $120,000, which was earmarked for Baltimore teacher Larry Wineke.
ENTERTAINMENT
By M.G. Lord and By M.G. Lord,Special to the Sun | November 19, 2000
"Wonder Woman: The Complete History," by Les Daniels. Chronicle. 206 pages. $29.95. Had the editors of Ms. magazine been able to read Les Daniels' fascinating, thoroughly researched "Wonder Woman," they might not have been so quick to nominate the female superhero for president. Nor would they necessarily have placed her on the cover of the magazine's debut issue in July 1972. Because of his erratic personal life, Wonder Woman's "father," William Moulton Marston, who created the Amazonian warrior in 1941, would not have held up under voter scrutiny.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 5, 1991
A CBS movie tonight takes a firm stand for a woman's right to choose. No, no, no, not that kind of right to choose. Advertisers back away from those movies.No, this sweeps-month special stands up for the freedom to choose to pose naked for Playboy magazine. Apparently advertisers don't balk at a choice like that. Is this a great country, or what?"Posing," which will be on Channel 11 (WBAL) at 9 o'clock, is frankly a better movie than it has any right to be, well-made and nicely acted. Nonetheless, it delivers its dubious message with little attention paid to important subtexts.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 12, 1995
A pair of sports events occupy the afternoon hours; Peter, Paul and Mary perform on public TV; and the movie selection is pretty good, too.* "PGA Championship" (2:30 p.m.-7 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- The fairways of the the Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif., are fringed with an exotic grass called kikuyu, making things tough in the rough. Follow the final rounds of the season's third major tournament, with a $1.75 million purse, today and tomorrow. CBS.* "World Track & Field Championships" (3 p.m.-6 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 2, 1999
POTOMAC -- OK, let's cut to the chase: Yes, Lynda Carter spent a lot of years living down Wonder Woman. But that's all in the past; right now, she's pretty happy with herself, her career and her legacy, and that includes a three-year stint as television's most bodacious post-feminist superhero."
NEWS
February 12, 1997
George W. DeFranceaux II,83, a retired mortgage banker and developer who helped establish a corporation that encouraged private investment in housing for people with low and moderate incomes, died Jan. 27 in Lafayette, La., his home in recent years.From 1969 to 1983, Mr. DeFranceaux played a leading role at the National Corporation for Housing Partnerships, a private, for-profit company created by Congress. He later owned and managed Waterfront Homes, a real estate business on Maryland's Eastern Shore, and was chief executive of First Mortgage Services of Easton.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | December 1, 1995
WHEN LARRY King gives a party, there are few regrets. He's expecting more than 400 people to attend "An Evening With Larry King and Friends" this evening at the Four Seasons Hotel in Washington.The party is a benefit for the Larry King Cardiac Foundation, established by King in 1988 to provide money for people, who, due to limited means and insurance, would be otherwise unable to receive a heart transplant.Last year's gala raised more than $120,000, which was earmarked for Baltimore teacher Larry Wineke.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 5, 1991
A CBS movie tonight takes a firm stand for a woman's right to choose. No, no, no, not that kind of right to choose. Advertisers back away from those movies.No, this sweeps-month special stands up for the freedom to choose to pose naked for Playboy magazine. Apparently advertisers don't balk at a choice like that. Is this a great country, or what?"Posing," which will be on Channel 11 (WBAL) at 9 o'clock, is frankly a better movie than it has any right to be, well-made and nicely acted. Nonetheless, it delivers its dubious message with little attention paid to important subtexts.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 23, 1991
If it's true that you can tell a lot about a society by its celebrities, what does it say about us that Patrick Duffy is ZTC becoming one of our biggest stars?This is something we should worry about, I think.Duffy's new sitcom, "Step by Step," is the second highest-rated new show of the season, and tonight at 9 (Channel 2) NBC trusts him to carry Danielle Steele's "Daddy" against game four of the World Series on CBS.While Duffy is surprisingly good at comedy on "Step by Step," he is not much of a dramatic actor.
NEWS
August 18, 1993
The acquittal of Washington attorney Robert A. Altman of criminal fraud charges is a milestone in the tangled history of the mysterious Bank of Credit and Commerce International. A successful prosecution of Mr. Altman and his mentor, the distinguished attorney and presidential adviser Clark Clifford, would have broken open one of the most perplexing international financial swindles in history. The clear-cut jury verdict in New York leaves the world's financial community still frustrated.One thing is certain: BCCI was a gigantic financial fraud.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2001
When Baltimore Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano was ordered into treatment for a drinking problem that surfaced in an ugly incident at a Fells Point bar last December, he didn't have to go far for help: a world-famous alcohol and drug-treatment center hidden at the end of a mile-long country drive in Harford County. When he returned to his city post sobered and contrite last month, Graziano became one of 15,000 graduates of Father Martin's Ashley, a posh rehabilitation facility on 43 manicured acres once owned by U.S. Sen. Millard E. Tydings and overlooking the upper Chesapeake Bay in Havre de Grace.
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