Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLymph Nodes
IN THE NEWS

Lymph Nodes

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg went home from the hospital yesterday, and the court announced that the colon cancer for which she underwent surgery had not spread.Ginsburg, 66, had been at the Washington Hospital Center for 11 days. The court's statement did not say when she would return to work, noting that she was "recuperating at home."Kathleen L. Arberg, the court's spokeswoman, revealed a number of details about Ginsburg's illness and surgery on Sept. 17. She said the colon cancer had reached "stage two," indicating a high survival rate after surgery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
After feeling a mass deep inside the tissue of her left breast, Sandra Gray faced a series of uphill battles that seemed unusually daunting. First, the longtime Columbia activist and wife of former County Councilman Vernon Gray had to convince doctors last August that the breast cancer was actually there because they couldn't detect it, she said. Then, she had to drum up physicians' support for a modified radical mastectomy, because surgeons balked at removing the breast when cancer still hadn't been found on a mammogram.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
A Baltimore County jury awarded a terminally ill psychotherapist $3.1 million yesterday after deciding that her doctor failed to diagnose lymphoma for three years.The jury deliberated for 45 minutes before finding that Dr. John Mann, a Baltimore County internist, had breached the standard of care for his patient, Lynn Sklar, 52, of Randallstown.The weeklong trial in the courtroom of Baltimore County Circuit Judge Dana M. Levitz included medical experts who testified that Mann should have biopsied swollen lymph nodes in his patient's neck when she complained about pain in 1995, her lawyer said.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
When 147 cyclists converged on Harford Community College on a recent Saturday, Adele Snowman was waiting to check them in for the Bike4BreastCancer fund-raiser. Her work with the organization and as a manager of the event suggests one of the ways her life has changed since she was diagnosed, treated and recovered from breast cancer. "Things will change, as far as how you perceive things," said Snowman, 62, of Upperco, who was treated 16 years ago and has been free of cancer ever since.
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2010
When 147 cyclists converged on Harford Community College on a recent Saturday, Adele Snowman was waiting to check them in for the Bike4BreastCancer fund-raiser. Her work with the organization and as a manager of the event suggests one of the ways her life has changed since she was diagnosed, treated and recovered from breast cancer. "Things will change, as far as how you perceive things," said Snowman, 62, of Upperco, who was treated 16 years ago and has been free of cancer ever since.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1995
Maryland's highest court reversed the conviction yesterday of a leading cancer surgeon who was accused of improperly touching a woman during a medical exam, apparently ending a two-year court battle.In a 4-3 decision, the court found no evidence that Dr. George Elias either intentionally or recklessly battered a female patient when he examined her groin during an office visit Jan. 5, 1993. The surgeon said he felt the area for swollen lymph nodes to rule out cancer."This is big stuff because I've never been accused of such a thing in my life," said Dr. Elias, who has practiced for 36 years.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2010
After feeling a mass deep inside the tissue of her left breast, Sandra Gray faced a series of uphill battles that seemed unusually daunting. First, the longtime Columbia activist and wife of former County Councilman Vernon Gray had to convince doctors last August that the breast cancer was actually there because they couldn't detect it, she said. Then, she had to drum up physicians' support for a modified radical mastectomy, because surgeons balked at removing the breast when cancer still hadn't been found on a mammogram.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | December 3, 1991
Q: My brother was recently told that he has Hodgkin's disease. I would appreciate more information on this disease and how it is treated.A: Hodgkin's disease is a type of lymphoma (malignant tumors of the lymphatic system) that includes lymph nodes and the spleen. Hodgkin's disease accounts for about one in 100 cancers in this country, and most commonly occurs in people between the ages of 15 and 35, or older than 50. Painless, progressive enlargement of lymph nodes in the neck is often the first manifestation of the disease.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | March 29, 1994
Q: Our 25-year-old son had been perfectly well but went to our family doctor because of enlarged lymph glands in his neck. A diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease was made by examining one of the glands after its removal. We were shocked and understand that Hodgkin's disease is a form of cancer. We would like to know our son's chances of being cured.A: Hodgkin's disease belongs to a group of lymphatic tissue growths, or neoplasms, collectively called the malignant lymphomas. Specific findings during the microscopic examination of tissue distinguishes Hodgkin's disease from other types of lymphomas, termed non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, which are more common and generally more cancerous.
NEWS
December 2, 2006
ROSALIE BRADFORD, 63 Weight, loss set records Rosalie Bradford, 63, who held records for being the world's heaviest woman and for losing the most weight, died Wednesday at a hospital in Lakeland near her Auburndale home in central Florida. She weighed 1,050 pounds in January 1987, according to the 1994 Guinness Book of Records. She lost 736 pounds to weigh 314 pounds in September 1992, according to the book. Publicist Stephen Nortier said she recently weighed about 400 pounds. He said the cause of death won't be known until a medical examiner's report but that she spent the last year bedridden with complications from having her lymph nodes severed years ago. She blamed her lifelong battle with obesity on abandonment.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
A Baltimore County jury awarded a terminally ill psychotherapist $3.1 million yesterday after deciding that her doctor failed to diagnose lymphoma for three years.The jury deliberated for 45 minutes before finding that Dr. John Mann, a Baltimore County internist, had breached the standard of care for his patient, Lynn Sklar, 52, of Randallstown.The weeklong trial in the courtroom of Baltimore County Circuit Judge Dana M. Levitz included medical experts who testified that Mann should have biopsied swollen lymph nodes in his patient's neck when she complained about pain in 1995, her lawyer said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg went home from the hospital yesterday, and the court announced that the colon cancer for which she underwent surgery had not spread.Ginsburg, 66, had been at the Washington Hospital Center for 11 days. The court's statement did not say when she would return to work, noting that she was "recuperating at home."Kathleen L. Arberg, the court's spokeswoman, revealed a number of details about Ginsburg's illness and surgery on Sept. 17. She said the colon cancer had reached "stage two," indicating a high survival rate after surgery.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1995
Maryland's highest court reversed the conviction yesterday of a leading cancer surgeon who was accused of improperly touching a woman during a medical exam, apparently ending a two-year court battle.In a 4-3 decision, the court found no evidence that Dr. George Elias either intentionally or recklessly battered a female patient when he examined her groin during an office visit Jan. 5, 1993. The surgeon said he felt the area for swollen lymph nodes to rule out cancer."This is big stuff because I've never been accused of such a thing in my life," said Dr. Elias, who has practiced for 36 years.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | December 3, 1991
Q: My brother was recently told that he has Hodgkin's disease. I would appreciate more information on this disease and how it is treated.A: Hodgkin's disease is a type of lymphoma (malignant tumors of the lymphatic system) that includes lymph nodes and the spleen. Hodgkin's disease accounts for about one in 100 cancers in this country, and most commonly occurs in people between the ages of 15 and 35, or older than 50. Painless, progressive enlargement of lymph nodes in the neck is often the first manifestation of the disease.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | January 21, 1992
Q: I know a cholesterol level less than 200 is desirable in adults, but how about teen-agers? My son has a cholesterol level of 185. Is that OK for a 16-year-old?A: A panel examining blood cholesterol levels in children and adolescents, has proposed a cholesterol less than 170 is desirable, a cholesterol of 200 or greater is high, and those in between are borderline. Because your son's cholesterol is borderline, the panel would recommend he have a second cholesterol test. If that value is also borderline or high, he should have further tests for triglycerides and HDL cholesterol after an overnight fast to determine whether the "bad" LDL cholesterol is elevated.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 24, 1997
A recent newspaper article said that Bob Dylan, my favorite singer, was just released from the hospital after treatment for a dangerous fungal infection called histoplasmosis. I would like to know more about histoplasmosis. How does the infection start? How is it diagnosed and treated?Infection begins when tiny spores of the histoplasmosis fungus are inhaled into the lungs. The fungus grows best on the surface of moist soils, containing bird and bat droppings. Although infection is found worldwide, in this country most cases are in the Mississippi and Ohio river valleys.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.