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NEWS
July 4, 1993
Summer months bring the threat of Lyme disease, and along with it often comes hysteria. President Clinton even named the week of June 6 "Lyme Disease Awareness Week." In some instances, Lyme disease can be prolonged, painful and even life-threatening. There is a dispute, though, over the number of confirmed cases and whether physicians are relying on inaccurate tests for the disease.A recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that only 23 percent of patients admitted to the New England Medical Center for Lyme disease were actually infected.
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NEWS
August 27, 2014
Letter writer David Boyd's experience with tick borne illnesses is, unfortunately, not uncommon ( "Getting help for Lyme disease symptoms Aug. 25). Many patients never find a tick, never get a rash, never had any indication of a bite until they develop symptoms. And, while testing for Lyme disease is still not 100 percent reliable, even if Mr. Boyd didn't have Lyme, he could have had any number of associated tick borne diseases. To this end, the International Lyme and Associated Diseases Society (ILADS)
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FEATURES
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun Reporter | June 7, 2007
Although more than 30,000 people in the U.S. are infected with Lyme disease each year, Dr. Robert Edelman says most infections can be avoided or, if not, then treated. "Even [with] a tick that has been feeding on you for one day, your chance of getting Lyme disease is remote, because it takes two to three days of feeding to infect people," he says. "Besides, four out of five ticks are not infected." Some ticks are difficult to see. When I'm checking my body, what areas should I pay closest attention to?
NEWS
August 25, 2014
I would like to add a few comments to the recent article about avoiding Lyme disease ( "Avoiding ticks is the key to preventing Lyme disease," Aug. 21). In mid-March of this year, I worked in the yard raking and bagging leaves left from the winter storms. I had Lyme disease two years ago so I checked myself over carefully and found no tick, rash or bite. However, about a week later I started getting mild headaches. Next, I experienced numbness in my feet, a slight ache in one ear, a mild ache in one hip joint and worst of all, extreme fatigue.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
A Johns Hopkins University scientist says he has identified the Lyme disease bacterium in two white-footed mice captured in Druid Hill Park.Dr. Brian S. Schwartz, a medical epidemiologist, told a gathering of entomologists in Baltimore yesterday that, while the findings are still preliminary, "we think that's the first time Lyme disease has been found in an inner-city park."The search for infected mammals in the park was prompted by a diagnosis of Lyme disease last year in an elephant keeper at the Baltimore Zoo, which is in the park.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | June 30, 1992
A growing number of Lyme Disease victims whose often crippling symptoms don't disappear after conventional treatment are clamoring for long-term antibiotic treatment that the experts insist is probably a waste of money.There is no evidence in the medical literature that [long-term antibiotic therapy] is necessary, or that you get a better result" than with the standard two to four weeks of oral or IV antibiotics, said Dr. Allan C. Steere, chief of rheumatology and immunology at the New England Medical Center, in Boston.
NEWS
October 12, 1990
Epidemiologists don't yet know what to make of the discovery of Lyme disease spirochetes in ticks found on mice in Druid Hill Park. So far, the likelihood of a mass disease outbreak is small, even though the park borders crowded neighborhoods, according to Brian S. Schwartz, the Johns Hopkins entomologist who found the bacteria.That's because of the way the disease is spread. Young deer ticks live on white-footed mice, the type in which Dr. Schwartz found the disease, and they live exclusively in wooded areas.
NEWS
June 1, 2007
The Howard County Health Department reminds residents that spring and summer months increase the risk of exposure to ticks and the possibility of Lyme disease, which spread through the bite of an infected tick. According to the National Lyme Disease Risk Map developed by the Centers for Disease Control, Howard County and Maryland are in the high-risk areas of the United States. Ticks that carry the disease are commonly found in woods and in areas between lawns and woods. Symptoms may include fever, headaches, fatigue and a rash in the shape of a bulls-eye.
NEWS
December 6, 1993
Lyme disease has been a controversial, almost faddish ailment since the tick-transmitted infection achieved widespread notoriety in the East in the 1980s. The symptoms such as arthritis, irritation and malaise are also associated with numerous other causes, physical and psychosomatic.Yet the bacterium carried by the black-legged tick is real, and human treatment with antibiotics seems clinically effective. A vaccine was developed for dogs, who can't avoid ticks, and scientists are working toward a preventive inoculation for horses.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2002
HOWARD COUNTY lived in blissful oblivion to the danger of deer ticks until the mid-1970s, when Lyme disease was first associated with the tiny insects. It was about that time that West Friendship veterinarian Wendy Feaga first suspected she had the tick-borne disease. "The disease is pretty prevalent," Feaga said. "A lot of people have it and don't know it." While the name of the affliction is now commonly known, the disease remains somewhat a mystery to doctors and victims alike. Pinhead-sized deer ticks are the primary carriers of Lyme disease, a bacterial infection that is fairly common in the Northeast.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Musicians will sing and strum and play the harmonica Thursday night in Annapolis night to raise funds - and awareness - for Lyme disease. Headlining the Ticked Off Music Fest will be Les Stroud, a TV survivalist and musician from Canada. He'll be joined by two musicians who survived Lyme disease and a lawyer-singer-songwriter from Annapolis. "My hope is to bring awareness to Anne Arundel County about the dangers of tick-borne diseases," said Karen Owen, a fitness instructor and mother from the Broadneck community who is organizing the concert.
HEALTH
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Robin Ann Wolfender was infected with Lyme disease in 1979, when she was a 19-year-old summer camp counselor at Catoctin Mountain Park in Thurmont. Just five years earlier, the tick-borne disease had been named for the Connecticut town where children were developing odd target-shaped rashes and arthritis. Two more years would pass before researchers would link the symptoms to ticks that latched on to human bodies, secreting poisons as they consumed blood. Wolfender, now 54, developed a fever of 105. It took a week for the fever to break, she says, and 11 years for doctors to diagnose her worsening health as Lyme disease.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
My son has had Lyme disease twice - serious infections requiring intravenous antibiotics. How can I keep ticks out of my yard? He plays in our wooded lot every day, and I'm at my wit's end! Ticks like to hang on branch tips and grab a ride when we brush by. Establish wide paths. Remove non-native invasive plants to encourage a functioning native ecosystem, which includes predators for the white-footed mice that are deer ticks' main host. Ticks are native and also have native predators, usually insects, that keep their numbers down.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | May 8, 2014
The Harford County Health Department and a local advocacy group are warning residents their spring and summer outdoor activities could put them at risk for Lyme disease, the most common vector borne disease in the United States. A bacterial disease, the most common way of contracting Lyme is from tick bites, such as the blacklegged tick, notes the health department, which says the Centers for Disease Control believes there are upward of 300,000 cases of the disease annually. During its meeting Tuesday night, the Harford County Council proclaimed May to be Lyme Disease Awareness Month in the county.
EXPLORE
By Lea Opdyke, Special to The Aegis | August 5, 2013
Lyme disease patients and caregivers met at the Bel Air Library on Saturday, July 27 for the second meeting of the newly formed Harford Lyme Advocates support group chapter of the National Capital Lyme Disease Association, http://www.NatCapLyme.org , an all-volunteer, not-for-profit organization founded in 2001 that is committed to helping patients diagnosed with tick-borne illnesses. Harford Lyme Advocates is one of almost 20 National Capital Lyme Disease Association chapters in the Mid-Atlantic region.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | May 14, 2013
With some exceptions, any illness can strike anyone at any time. One of the more dangerous to emerge in recent decades is Lyme disease. Harford County, as many of us know either first-hand or because of someone we know, is not immune from the tick-borne disease. The revelation last week that Harford County Council President Billy Boniface has contracted the sickness is yet another reminder. Lyme disease is treatable, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but it can also be debilitating.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2008
Reported cases of Lyme disease in Maryland doubled last year and more than tripled in Howard County, leading the county health officer to join state officials yesterday in warning citizens and recommending prevention measures. "We're seeing a dramatic increase in Lyme disease in the area," said Dr. Peter Beilenson, adding that experts believe many cases go unreported. Statewide, the number of reported cases jumped from 1,248 in 2006 to 2,576 last year. In Howard County, the number increased from 113 to 358 during the same period.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Md. Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Uni. of Md. Cooperative Extension Service, U.S. Army Environmental Hygiene Agency, STAFF GRAPHICStaff Writer | November 28, 1993
John and Grace Hiter seem to have the perfect gentleman's farm, with a large stone and wood-frame house, part of it built in the early 1700s, that sits on a grassy hillside under a granddaddy of a beech tree.Despite its idyllic facade, the farm near Aberdeen is the focus of an unusual debate over Lyme disease -- and whether a public health risk would be created if 1,600 townhouses and apartments were built on an adjacent, 315-acre wooded site.Some experts have called the Hiter farm a "hotbed" of the disease.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
Hundreds of Baltimore-area families have volunteered for a government study to spray their suburban yards with pesticide, which researchers hope can protect them from Lyme disease but that environmentalists warn is unsafe. The goal, federal and state health officials say, is to find a new way to prevent the widespread illness, which is spread by tick bites and can cause fever, headaches and fatigue — and, if untreated, may even affect joints, nerves and the heart. Half of the 185 families who've signed up this year in Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties are having the edges of their yards sprayed with bifenthrin, a chemical pesticide commonly applied around homes to fight ticks, fleas and mosquitoes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2012
As if robocalls didn't have a bad enough reputation in the world of Baltimore media and politics thanks to consultant Julius Henson's activity in the last gubernatorial election, along comes WBFF (Channel 45) Monday night with its own questionable computer-generated calls into hundreds of thousands on Maryland homes. And the calls continued Tuesday. I received one at my home in Baltimore City both days. Raquel Guillory, director of communications for Gov. Martin O'Malley, also received one at home in Howard County Monday night around dinnertime.
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