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NEWS
February 21, 2003
Suddenly, on February 15, 2003, MICHAEL LYE; loving husband of Susan J. Lye; beloved father of Gabrielle Hayes, Paula D'Alonzo and Joanne Lye; loving grandfather of Julia and Lucy Hayes, Noah and Ashton D'Alonzo. Also survived by many friends and family in England. A Memorial Service will be held on Wednesday, February 26 at 2 P.M. at THE HARRY H. WITZKE FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City. Interment private. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the American Heart Association.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN CARPENTER and SUSAN CARPENTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2005
The first time Ben Clark met his online gaming friends in the real world, he was nervous. For months he'd been playing World of Warcraft with a group of other gamers, masquerading as a surly green "orc" to protect them from pick-pocketing rogues and spell-casting warlocks in the popular medieval fantasy role-playing game. Clark knew only a handful of the gamers from real life. The rest he met and got to know by chatting on the WOW instant-messaging system between bouts with enemy players.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Ever since 50-year-old professional golfers found a way to extend their careers and replenish their bank accounts with a golden parachute called the Senior Tour, this avenue paved with riches has also been a metaphor for being given a new lease on life. Mark Lye doesn't need such metaphors. Trying to combine an eight-year career as an analyst on The Golf Channel while renewing his playing career on what this year became the Champions Tour, Lye is hopeful, but not certain, about the length of his lease.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Ever since 50-year-old professional golfers found a way to extend their careers and replenish their bank accounts with a golden parachute called the Senior Tour, this avenue paved with riches has also been a metaphor for being given a new lease on life. Mark Lye doesn't need such metaphors. Trying to combine an eight-year career as an analyst on The Golf Channel while renewing his playing career on what this year became the Champions Tour, Lye is hopeful, but not certain, about the length of his lease.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 28, 1992
Mayor Kurt Schmoke's recent entreaty to start recycling garbage and refuse got me thinking. Was what he proposed really anything new?As a child, we returned soft-drink bottles for 2 cents each. The milk man took back the empty glass jugs. Used paper envelopes became scrap paper. And animal fat never went into the ash can.My thrifty grandmother saved grease and fats for the scrubbing soap she made. In the 1950s, not too many Baltimoreans made their own soap. But she deliberately clung to the ways of her mother and ran a decidedly old-fashioned household.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | January 27, 2001
A FEW DAYS ago my father invited me back to the house on Guilford Avenue to unveil his newest addition - a fine oak floor installed in his sunny kitchen. We'd talked about new floors for years. Finally, after the holidays, he called in the carpenters and did the deed. It's a glistening piece of tongue-and-groove work, worthy of the bountiful meals prepared in the social center of the house. Don't ask me to explain it. The kitchen, with its pair of south-facing windows aimed toward Ilchester Avenue, is heart of the operation, the place where confidences are traded and boiled white icing birthday cakes made.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
Englishman Mick Lye bypassed J. K.'s Pub, his usual haunt, for another local tavern that has cable television so that he could catch a World Cup soccer tournament game recently.His pub-hopping experiment didn't last long. He couldn't force himself to stay past halftime."It was like drinking in an airport," said Mr. Lye, one of the regulars at J. K.'s Pub who often engages in debate with other loyal J. K.'s patrons on the merits of soccer vs. American football.The 16-year-old Wilde Lake Village Green tavern, which Mr. Lye considers the closest thing in the region to an English pub because of its camaraderie and unpretentious atmosphere, has been put up for sale by its owners, Columbia residents John and Claire Lea.The Leas say they no longer have the time or energy to operate J. K.'s Pub the way they have always run it."
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | June 16, 2001
I WAS heading over Windsor Mill Road the other Saturday when I heard a radio report about a community that wanted to outlaw outdoor wash lines. The town officials felt that exterior laundry lines hung with clothing were somehow down-market and ugly. They went so far as to compare them to graffiti. I would compare hanging laundry outside to hard work. And before the near-universal arrival of the mechanical clothes dryer, it is a household chore that was very much a part of everyday life.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | September 29, 1996
25 years -- ago Riot gear, including gas grenades and grenade launchers, and another unmarked police car for the Westminster police force were discussed as possibilities by a committee of the City Council Monday night. The proposals were among suggestions to "update the police force to give it more effectiveness on the street," according to Councilman Thomas W. Eckard. Also discussed at the meeting was the "goon squad" proposal made recently by Eckard. The squad, which would be made up of off-duty policemen paid by the city, would aim to crack down on unlawful conduct of "goons" or hoodlums in the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN CARPENTER and SUSAN CARPENTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2005
The first time Ben Clark met his online gaming friends in the real world, he was nervous. For months he'd been playing World of Warcraft with a group of other gamers, masquerading as a surly green "orc" to protect them from pick-pocketing rogues and spell-casting warlocks in the popular medieval fantasy role-playing game. Clark knew only a handful of the gamers from real life. The rest he met and got to know by chatting on the WOW instant-messaging system between bouts with enemy players.
NEWS
February 21, 2003
Suddenly, on February 15, 2003, MICHAEL LYE; loving husband of Susan J. Lye; beloved father of Gabrielle Hayes, Paula D'Alonzo and Joanne Lye; loving grandfather of Julia and Lucy Hayes, Noah and Ashton D'Alonzo. Also survived by many friends and family in England. A Memorial Service will be held on Wednesday, February 26 at 2 P.M. at THE HARRY H. WITZKE FAMILY FUNERAL HOME, INC., 4112 Old Columbia Pike, Ellicott City. Interment private. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the American Heart Association.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | June 16, 2001
I WAS heading over Windsor Mill Road the other Saturday when I heard a radio report about a community that wanted to outlaw outdoor wash lines. The town officials felt that exterior laundry lines hung with clothing were somehow down-market and ugly. They went so far as to compare them to graffiti. I would compare hanging laundry outside to hard work. And before the near-universal arrival of the mechanical clothes dryer, it is a household chore that was very much a part of everyday life.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | January 27, 2001
A FEW DAYS ago my father invited me back to the house on Guilford Avenue to unveil his newest addition - a fine oak floor installed in his sunny kitchen. We'd talked about new floors for years. Finally, after the holidays, he called in the carpenters and did the deed. It's a glistening piece of tongue-and-groove work, worthy of the bountiful meals prepared in the social center of the house. Don't ask me to explain it. The kitchen, with its pair of south-facing windows aimed toward Ilchester Avenue, is heart of the operation, the place where confidences are traded and boiled white icing birthday cakes made.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1999
Blue Nitro, the new "club drug" of the suburban set, is sometimes billed as a safe, natural high.It's about as safe and natural as floor varnish and lye -- two of the ingredients kitchen chemists commonly use to make it, according to Maryland anti-drug officials who have counted 10 overdose cases in emergency rooms around the state since January. That's an increase over last year, when two overdoses were reported to the Maryland Poison Center.An overdose of the drug GHB, sometimes called Blue Nitro, starts off like a bad drunk and can end in seizures, comas, and pneumonia, according to a report to Maryland's newly formed Drug Early Warning System from the poison control center.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | October 27, 1996
EVEN IN MY CHILDHOOD, an era when thrift was a virtue, nobody made bars of soap at home. Nobody, that is, except my grandmother Lily Rose and my great-aunt Cora, who made an enamel pan full of soap every fall -- in the very kitchen where the trusty Oriole-brand range produced flannel cakes and roast beef.I dreaded the ordeal then. But now that the ritual has passed, I miss it.I didn't know it at the time, but I absorbed some elementary lessons in household finance from these two sisters. They sewed and tailored many of the clothes they wore.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | September 29, 1996
25 years -- ago Riot gear, including gas grenades and grenade launchers, and another unmarked police car for the Westminster police force were discussed as possibilities by a committee of the City Council Monday night. The proposals were among suggestions to "update the police force to give it more effectiveness on the street," according to Councilman Thomas W. Eckard. Also discussed at the meeting was the "goon squad" proposal made recently by Eckard. The squad, which would be made up of off-duty policemen paid by the city, would aim to crack down on unlawful conduct of "goons" or hoodlums in the city.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | October 27, 1996
EVEN IN MY CHILDHOOD, an era when thrift was a virtue, nobody made bars of soap at home. Nobody, that is, except my grandmother Lily Rose and my great-aunt Cora, who made an enamel pan full of soap every fall -- in the very kitchen where the trusty Oriole-brand range produced flannel cakes and roast beef.I dreaded the ordeal then. But now that the ritual has passed, I miss it.I didn't know it at the time, but I absorbed some elementary lessons in household finance from these two sisters. They sewed and tailored many of the clothes they wore.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | June 2, 1991
It was because of the goats, Marti Cook will tell you, that she and her husband Lee got into the soap-making business.And before you can even raise an eyebrow, she goes on to say, "About four years ago we had some goats and we thought, What are we going to do with all this milk? We can't give it away. We can't sell it. We're not a dairy. It's against the law to do absolutely anything with it."Then one day, she continues, they saw somebody selling goat milk soap. "And we thought that would be something to get into, something to do with our extra milk."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
Englishman Mick Lye bypassed J. K.'s Pub, his usual haunt, for another local tavern that has cable television so that he could catch a World Cup soccer tournament game recently.His pub-hopping experiment didn't last long. He couldn't force himself to stay past halftime."It was like drinking in an airport," said Mr. Lye, one of the regulars at J. K.'s Pub who often engages in debate with other loyal J. K.'s patrons on the merits of soccer vs. American football.The 16-year-old Wilde Lake Village Green tavern, which Mr. Lye considers the closest thing in the region to an English pub because of its camaraderie and unpretentious atmosphere, has been put up for sale by its owners, Columbia residents John and Claire Lea.The Leas say they no longer have the time or energy to operate J. K.'s Pub the way they have always run it."
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | July 28, 1994
It has taken 79 years for the soapstone stationary laundry tubs to wear out.The plumber issued the death certificate earlier this summer. They'd cracked and leaked. These venerable troughs that began their life in the washboard era finally needed replacing.The cellar tubs came with my family's old Guilford Avenue house when my great-grandfather moved there in 1915. With Grandpop William Stewart were his wife, mother-in-law, two sons, five daughters and the family's pit bulldog.It's amazing those tubs lasted as long as they did given the stress they endured.
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