Advertisement
HomeCollectionsLydell Mitchell
IN THE NEWS

Lydell Mitchell

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
It seemed an ordinary run - a seven-yard burst up the gut, early in a game that the playoff-bound Colts would win easily. But when Lydell Mitchell trotted back to the huddle on that chilly November day in 1977, play stopped and the Memorial Stadium crowd of 50,957 stood and cheered the man who'd just set a new team career rushing record. It happened 35 years ago this week, a moment stamped in Mitchell's mind. The player whose mark he broke? Hall of Famer Lenny Moore . "I don't remember anything else about that game except that, at that moment, Lenny came out on the field and presented me with the football," Mitchell said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
It seemed an ordinary run - a seven-yard burst up the gut, early in a game that the playoff-bound Colts would win easily. But when Lydell Mitchell trotted back to the huddle on that chilly November day in 1977, play stopped and the Memorial Stadium crowd of 50,957 stood and cheered the man who'd just set a new team career rushing record. It happened 35 years ago this week, a moment stamped in Mitchell's mind. The player whose mark he broke? Hall of Famer Lenny Moore . "I don't remember anything else about that game except that, at that moment, Lenny came out on the field and presented me with the football," Mitchell said.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1996
If Franco Harris and Lydell Mitchell are to turn around Parks Sausage Co., they must win over people like Charles Hurtt of West Baltimore.Hurtt, 44, born just two years after Parks Sausage, used to go out of his way to buy sausages made by the Baltimore company. But he soured a bit on Parks last month when he bought three bags of sausage with expiration dates a day earlier."You're supposed to have 14 days before expiration date when you buy them," he said. "I'm a loyal customer. But they need to look closely at their products.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Lenny Moore and Lydell Mitchell were two of Penn State's greatest players, and not surprisingly, became two of the greatest Baltimore Colts. Two weeks ago they drove to State College, Pa., to pay their respects to Joe Paterno, who died Sunday and who they give much of the credit for their success on and off the field. "When you say Penn State, you say Joe Paterno," said Moore, the Colts' Hall of Fame running back. Moore played for the Nittany Lions in the mid-1950s, when Paterno was assistant to head coach Rip Engle.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | August 3, 1994
DURING MY teens -- when I considered myself a loyal Orioles fan -- one afternoon I took my youngest brother to a game. A group of black boys -- who had apparently sneaked in -- meandered over to our area of the upper deck, followed by an usher who ordered the group, plus me and my brother, to leave.I immediately showed him our ticket stubs as proof that we had paid to get in. He gave us the boot anyway.Despite that incident, I still considered myself a loyal Orioles fan -- until they traded Frank Robinson in 1972.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 2, 1996
It was a sunny day of noise and emotion that kept coming back around to one man.Ted Marchibroda gave a game ball to each of the Ravens after they beat the Oakland Raiders yesterday at Memorial Stadium, but the players should have returned the balls to their coach.Not because they didn't deserve them; they did, after playing with such heart and rallying to win.But the day belonged to Marchibroda.He was the only real link between the Colts and Ravens, the centerpiece of the pre-game ceremony connecting the city's football past and present.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | November 26, 2009
He wore silver football shoes, the right color for a mercurial runner. Was there ever a seam so small that Joe Washington couldn't sneak through it? For three years, he rallied Colts fans, feinting and dashing and dancing for yardage, a ray of hope on a team spinning in reverse. "Yeah, they were lean times," Washington, 56, said of his stint in Baltimore (1978-1980). "But I never thought I had limits. I could get in and out of places that other guys couldn't dream of. "My feet had a mind of their own."
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2012
Lenny Moore and Lydell Mitchell were two of Penn State's greatest players, and not surprisingly, became two of the greatest Baltimore Colts. Two weeks ago they drove to State College, Pa., to pay their respects to Joe Paterno, who died Sunday and who they give much of the credit for their success on and off the field. "When you say Penn State, you say Joe Paterno," said Moore, the Colts' Hall of Fame running back. Moore played for the Nittany Lions in the mid-1950s, when Paterno was assistant to head coach Rip Engle.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | July 7, 1996
If outstanding citizenship awards were given to athletes, past or present, Lydell Mitchell would be a 24-karat qualifier. He was one of the most productive Baltimore Colts in the history of the franchise -- that's 35 years' worth -- but, quietly, without cheers ringing or trumpets blaring, his involvement in an ambitious business endeavor promises to make a more important impact.He's surging toward another objective. Mitchell is a key player in the revitalization of the Parks Sausage Co., which was once at the top of its game but has fallen on hard times.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2001
There is an electric air of anticipation around Baltimore as the Ravens conclude their preparations to open the 2001 NFL season in defense of their world championship. This euphoric feeling is in stark contrast to the atmosphere surrounding the training camp of the Baltimore Colts a quarter of a century ago. "Rebellion" rather than "repeat" was the word most often heard among the 1976 Colts, rallying in support of their coach, Ted Marchibroda, who had resigned a week before the season opener in a power struggle with general manager Joe Thomas.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | December 1, 2011
Sports Legends Museum L. Mitchell to attend tribute to former Colts The Babe Ruth Birthplace Foundation announced Wednesday that former Baltimore Colts running back Lydell Mitchell and NFL senior adviser Joe Browne will be part of "A Legendary Evening: Celebrating our Baltimore Colts Hall of Famers" on Dec.6 at Martin's West. The evening will pay tribute to former Colts Art Donovan , Lenny Moore , Gino Marchetti , Raymond Berry , Weeb Ewbank , John Mackey and Jim Parker as they are inducted into the Hall of Legends, an area at Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards reserved for the elite of Maryland's sports culture.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | November 26, 2009
He wore silver football shoes, the right color for a mercurial runner. Was there ever a seam so small that Joe Washington couldn't sneak through it? For three years, he rallied Colts fans, feinting and dashing and dancing for yardage, a ray of hope on a team spinning in reverse. "Yeah, they were lean times," Washington, 56, said of his stint in Baltimore (1978-1980). "But I never thought I had limits. I could get in and out of places that other guys couldn't dream of. "My feet had a mind of their own."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 9, 2001
There is an electric air of anticipation around Baltimore as the Ravens conclude their preparations to open the 2001 NFL season in defense of their world championship. This euphoric feeling is in stark contrast to the atmosphere surrounding the training camp of the Baltimore Colts a quarter of a century ago. "Rebellion" rather than "repeat" was the word most often heard among the 1976 Colts, rallying in support of their coach, Ted Marchibroda, who had resigned a week before the season opener in a power struggle with general manager Joe Thomas.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1996
If Franco Harris and Lydell Mitchell are to turn around Parks Sausage Co., they must win over people like Charles Hurtt of West Baltimore.Hurtt, 44, born just two years after Parks Sausage, used to go out of his way to buy sausages made by the Baltimore company. But he soured a bit on Parks last month when he bought three bags of sausage with expiration dates a day earlier."You're supposed to have 14 days before expiration date when you buy them," he said. "I'm a loyal customer. But they need to look closely at their products.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | September 2, 1996
It was a sunny day of noise and emotion that kept coming back around to one man.Ted Marchibroda gave a game ball to each of the Ravens after they beat the Oakland Raiders yesterday at Memorial Stadium, but the players should have returned the balls to their coach.Not because they didn't deserve them; they did, after playing with such heart and rallying to win.But the day belonged to Marchibroda.He was the only real link between the Colts and Ravens, the centerpiece of the pre-game ceremony connecting the city's football past and present.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | July 7, 1996
If outstanding citizenship awards were given to athletes, past or present, Lydell Mitchell would be a 24-karat qualifier. He was one of the most productive Baltimore Colts in the history of the franchise -- that's 35 years' worth -- but, quietly, without cheers ringing or trumpets blaring, his involvement in an ambitious business endeavor promises to make a more important impact.He's surging toward another objective. Mitchell is a key player in the revitalization of the Parks Sausage Co., which was once at the top of its game but has fallen on hard times.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | December 1, 2011
Sports Legends Museum L. Mitchell to attend tribute to former Colts The Babe Ruth Birthplace Foundation announced Wednesday that former Baltimore Colts running back Lydell Mitchell and NFL senior adviser Joe Browne will be part of "A Legendary Evening: Celebrating our Baltimore Colts Hall of Famers" on Dec.6 at Martin's West. The evening will pay tribute to former Colts Art Donovan , Lenny Moore , Gino Marchetti , Raymond Berry , Weeb Ewbank , John Mackey and Jim Parker as they are inducted into the Hall of Legends, an area at Sports Legends Museum at Camden Yards reserved for the elite of Maryland's sports culture.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | January 11, 2007
Idon't know what the Ravens have planned for Saturday's pre-game ceremony, but if they really want to fire up the crowd at M&T Bank Stadium, why not bring back and introduce some of the old Colts? The place would go absolutely mad. Right before the pre-game, introduce Lenny Moore, then Tom Matte. Bring back Bert Jones or Lydell Mitchell. And, of course, then introduce the Ravens and let Ray Lewis dance. Wow! The excitement would register on the Richter scale. Colts owner Jim Irsay always attempts to wipe his hands of the Colts' move from Baltimore to Indianapolis, but he could have made a serious peace offer by giving the name and colors back to Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | August 3, 1994
DURING MY teens -- when I considered myself a loyal Orioles fan -- one afternoon I took my youngest brother to a game. A group of black boys -- who had apparently sneaked in -- meandered over to our area of the upper deck, followed by an usher who ordered the group, plus me and my brother, to leave.I immediately showed him our ticket stubs as proof that we had paid to get in. He gave us the boot anyway.Despite that incident, I still considered myself a loyal Orioles fan -- until they traded Frank Robinson in 1972.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.