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By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | November 5, 2003
To reduce the risk of prostate cancer, it might take the whole tomato. New research on rats suggests that eating whole tomatoes can reduce prostate cancer deaths more effectively than taking supplements of lycopene, a chemical in tomatoes that has been associated with lower prostate cancer risk. Earlier studies in humans found a link between high lycopene blood levels and a lower risk of prostate cancer, but it was not clear whether lycopene was the effective agent or whether it simply signified tomato consumption.
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By Chelsea Martinez and Chelsea Martinez,Los Angeels Times | July 26, 2007
This just in: Organic tomatoes have more lycopene than conventionally farmed tomatoes. This also just in: Lycopene may not be as healthful as we thought. So goes the bold field of tomato research. As the most frequently consumed produce in America after potatoes, tomatoes provide vitamins, minerals and fiber -- and, of course, they're nonfat. Plus, with high levels of the antioxidant lycopene, they've been considered a potentially powerful cancer fighter. But even as new research identifies which growing methods produce the most lycopene-rich tomatoes, the Food and Drug Administration has said the fruit's health-boosting powers can't be proved.
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FEATURES
By Chelsea Martinez and Chelsea Martinez,Los Angeels Times | July 26, 2007
This just in: Organic tomatoes have more lycopene than conventionally farmed tomatoes. This also just in: Lycopene may not be as healthful as we thought. So goes the bold field of tomato research. As the most frequently consumed produce in America after potatoes, tomatoes provide vitamins, minerals and fiber -- and, of course, they're nonfat. Plus, with high levels of the antioxidant lycopene, they've been considered a potentially powerful cancer fighter. But even as new research identifies which growing methods produce the most lycopene-rich tomatoes, the Food and Drug Administration has said the fruit's health-boosting powers can't be proved.
NEWS
By Roni Rabin and Roni Rabin,NEWSDAY | November 5, 2003
To reduce the risk of prostate cancer, it might take the whole tomato. New research on rats suggests that eating whole tomatoes can reduce prostate cancer deaths more effectively than taking supplements of lycopene, a chemical in tomatoes that has been associated with lower prostate cancer risk. Earlier studies in humans found a link between high lycopene blood levels and a lower risk of prostate cancer, but it was not clear whether lycopene was the effective agent or whether it simply signified tomato consumption.
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 1997
Move over carrots and make room for tomatoes. They seem destined for center stage in the war against common cancers and perhaps other age-related diseases.Diets rich in tomatoes and tomato products have been strongly linked to a reduced risk of cancers of the prostate and digestive tract, including colon and rectal cancers, which are among the leading cancer killers of Americans.For example, in a six-year study of 48,000 male health professionals, Dr. Edward Giovannucci and colleagues at Harvard Medical School found that consuming tomatoes, tomato sauce or pizza more than twice a week, as opposed to never, was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer of 21 percent to 34 percent, depending on the food.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | August 7, 1996
Books offer basics of Tex-Mex fareThe "foundation foods" of Texas border cooking are the subjects of three new cookbooks from author and specialty foods entrepreneur W. Parr Kerr. In "Chiles," "Beans," and "Tortillas" (Morrow, $15 each), Kerr, head of the Old El Paso Chile Co., offers recipes such as red chili-cheese bread, creamy poblano succotash, and chocolate-Kahlua sundaes in tortilla cups.State Fair competitionsThere's still time to enter the annual product-based Maryland State Fair cooking contests.
NEWS
March 9, 2002
GARRISON KEILLOR and the Ketchup Advisory Board must be having a good laugh now. For years, the radio show host and his regulars have lampooned the tomato-based condiment and its "natural mellowing agents." For a testy husband, a hormonal wife, a dollop of ketchup can cure your woes, as the advisory board's theme song goes, "A new day is dawning, a new life has begun ... " And now comes Dr. Edward L. Giovannucci of the Harvard School of Public Health with the real word on ketchup's healing powers.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2002
It's ruby red and sweet and, this time of year, ripe and abundant. It's also bursting with juice. Watermelon is one of the delights of summer. But it's most often enjoyed as chunks of fruit, while its potential as a sipper's delight often goes unrecognized. That may be changing as watermelon juice turns up in more recipes. A recent feature on the food and nutrition Web site Foodfit.com featured a watermelon-juice recipe from the chef-owners of the Border Grill in Santa Monica, Calif., Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | July 19, 2000
Juicy health tip Sure, watermelon is a refreshing summer treat, but now there is a new reason to enjoy a slice. Scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture have found that watermelon contains high levels of lycopene - an antioxidant that may help the body fight cancer and prevent disease. Freezing point Fill containers almost to full when freezing food, a recent issue of Cooking Light recommends. Putting a small portion of food into a large container captures air that could allow ice crystals to form.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2002
Green light for some red foods If you want to be in the pink of health, eat red. The National Cancer Institute reports that deep-red or bright-pink fruit and vegetables contain phytochemicals that help your body fight disease and promote good health. These phytochemicals include lycopene - which is found in watermelons, pink grapefruit and tomatoes - and anthocyanins found in strawberries, raspberries and beets. Lycopenes help reduce the risk of several kinds of cancer while anthocyanins help control high blood pressure and protect against diabetes-related circulatory problems.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2002
It's ruby red and sweet and, this time of year, ripe and abundant. It's also bursting with juice. Watermelon is one of the delights of summer. But it's most often enjoyed as chunks of fruit, while its potential as a sipper's delight often goes unrecognized. That may be changing as watermelon juice turns up in more recipes. A recent feature on the food and nutrition Web site Foodfit.com featured a watermelon-juice recipe from the chef-owners of the Border Grill in Santa Monica, Calif., Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2002
Green light for some red foods If you want to be in the pink of health, eat red. The National Cancer Institute reports that deep-red or bright-pink fruit and vegetables contain phytochemicals that help your body fight disease and promote good health. These phytochemicals include lycopene - which is found in watermelons, pink grapefruit and tomatoes - and anthocyanins found in strawberries, raspberries and beets. Lycopenes help reduce the risk of several kinds of cancer while anthocyanins help control high blood pressure and protect against diabetes-related circulatory problems.
NEWS
March 9, 2002
GARRISON KEILLOR and the Ketchup Advisory Board must be having a good laugh now. For years, the radio show host and his regulars have lampooned the tomato-based condiment and its "natural mellowing agents." For a testy husband, a hormonal wife, a dollop of ketchup can cure your woes, as the advisory board's theme song goes, "A new day is dawning, a new life has begun ... " And now comes Dr. Edward L. Giovannucci of the Harvard School of Public Health with the real word on ketchup's healing powers.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | July 19, 2000
Juicy health tip Sure, watermelon is a refreshing summer treat, but now there is a new reason to enjoy a slice. Scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture have found that watermelon contains high levels of lycopene - an antioxidant that may help the body fight cancer and prevent disease. Freezing point Fill containers almost to full when freezing food, a recent issue of Cooking Light recommends. Putting a small portion of food into a large container captures air that could allow ice crystals to form.
FEATURES
By Jane E. Brody and Jane E. Brody,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 1997
Move over carrots and make room for tomatoes. They seem destined for center stage in the war against common cancers and perhaps other age-related diseases.Diets rich in tomatoes and tomato products have been strongly linked to a reduced risk of cancers of the prostate and digestive tract, including colon and rectal cancers, which are among the leading cancer killers of Americans.For example, in a six-year study of 48,000 male health professionals, Dr. Edward Giovannucci and colleagues at Harvard Medical School found that consuming tomatoes, tomato sauce or pizza more than twice a week, as opposed to never, was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer of 21 percent to 34 percent, depending on the food.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | August 7, 1996
Books offer basics of Tex-Mex fareThe "foundation foods" of Texas border cooking are the subjects of three new cookbooks from author and specialty foods entrepreneur W. Parr Kerr. In "Chiles," "Beans," and "Tortillas" (Morrow, $15 each), Kerr, head of the Old El Paso Chile Co., offers recipes such as red chili-cheese bread, creamy poblano succotash, and chocolate-Kahlua sundaes in tortilla cups.State Fair competitionsThere's still time to enter the annual product-based Maryland State Fair cooking contests.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 19, 1995
Tomatoes, especially when they're cooked with a little olive oil, may be good preventive medicine for the prostate.A study published recently in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that men who ate a combined total of 10 servings per week of tomatoes, tomato sauce and pizza had lower risks of prostate cancer than men who averaged only 1.5 servings per week.This particular study clarifies one prevention puzzle piece, critical because curing advanced-stage prostate cancer remains unlikely.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 28, 2009
It is the height of grapefruit season, a time to feast on fruit shipped in to us from warmer climes. The tastiest grapefruit in America come either from Florida or Texas, depending on whom you speak to. After listening to folks on both sides of this fruit fight, I concluded that the rivalry between these two grapefruit-growing regions resembled one surrounding a college football game. This was, in other words, another citrus bowl where almost every facet of a rival grapefruit's appeal was contested.
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