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By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Baltimore residential real estate broker Bonnie Fleck is no stranger to luxury. "I think it might be because my very first car was an Audi," Fleck said when asked why she chooses luxury cars instead of more utilitarian models. She also wants to give clients a comfortable ride as they drive from home to home, so she leases a new high-end car every few years. On Thursday, she picked up a black sedan at Lexus of Towson, which sold 208 vehicles last month — 60 more than May 2011, said Mike Meagher, the dealership's general manager.
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BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Baltimore residential real estate broker Bonnie Fleck is no stranger to luxury. "I think it might be because my very first car was an Audi," Fleck said when asked why she chooses luxury cars instead of more utilitarian models. She also wants to give clients a comfortable ride as they drive from home to home, so she leases a new high-end car every few years. On Thursday, she picked up a black sedan at Lexus of Towson, which sold 208 vehicles last month — 60 more than May 2011, said Mike Meagher, the dealership's general manager.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
It's no longer taboo to spend money lavishly if sales of high-end goods are any indicator. And that bodes well for retailers this Valentine's Day. A resurgence in spending by the luxury consumer is expected to benefit stores that sell accessories, jewelry and apparel. And even the average shopper may be inclined to splurge for a day typically associated with pricier gifts. Men, who outnumber women 2-to-1 in buying for the holiday, are expected to spend $150 to $200 on average. Shoppers kept local jewelers busy over the last couple of weekends, and store operators said they were expecting the rush to continue for last-minute customers.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2012
It's no longer taboo to spend money lavishly if sales of high-end goods are any indicator. And that bodes well for retailers this Valentine's Day. A resurgence in spending by the luxury consumer is expected to benefit stores that sell accessories, jewelry and apparel. And even the average shopper may be inclined to splurge for a day typically associated with pricier gifts. Men, who outnumber women 2-to-1 in buying for the holiday, are expected to spend $150 to $200 on average. Shoppers kept local jewelers busy over the last couple of weekends, and store operators said they were expecting the rush to continue for last-minute customers.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
Scott Greatorex cannot wait to sail the Chesapeake Bay in his new 25-foot luxury yacht with gorgeous teak paneling, two cabins, a galley, a flat-screen TV and enough nautical gadgets to man the vessel alone if he so desired. He can already picture overnight stays and strolls with his family along Main Street stores this spring since the Wind Orchid also happens to be docked on an enviable piece of real estate on Spa Creek near the heart of historic Annapolis. To do it on his own, it would cost $180,000 just to buy the same Catalina sailboat, plus thousands more in maintenance, slip fees, insurance and other costs -- making such a luxurious hobby far out of reach for a 49-year-old manager at NASA.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- When South Koreans observe the world's attempt to choke the flow of French cognac, designer watches, flashy cars and other luxuries to North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il, they find themselves in a familiar situation. Bitterly divided. The call by the United Nations Security Council to ban exports of luxury goods to North Korea has been met with a certain satisfaction in capitals such as Washington and Tokyo, landing at least a quick jab in negotiations over Pyongyang's nuclear program that resemble boxers in an endless clinch.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 13, 2004
PARIS - A French court has ordered Morgan Stanley to pay 30 million euros, or $38 million, to LVMH Moet Hennessey Louis Vuitton SA, ruling that research by the Wall Street bank defamed LVMH. A lawsuit brought by LVMH contended that the luxury goods analyst for Morgan Stanley had issued biased research to help its investment banking client, Gucci Group, LVMH's biggest rival. The ruling yesterday echoes concerns that have been raised in the United States and elsewhere over potential conflicts of interest among analyst at investment banks.
BUSINESS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Thomas S. Mulligan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2005
NEW YORK - At the Sherry-Lehmann wine shop on Madison Avenue, $500 bottles of Bordeaux are selling at a clip that owner Michael Aaron figures is 7 percent ahead of 2003's pace. "It's instant gratification," Aaron said last week, "and why not get it?" The reason for the increase: Wall Street securities firms have been shelling out their annual bonuses, the discretionary six- and seven-figure payouts that can account for up to 90 percent of an investment banker's or bond trader's income.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 30, 1995
BANGKOK, Thailand -- With France only weeks from resuming nuclear testing, Japan is threatening an economic boycott that could harm the French economy.The Japanese government has bitterly criticized the decision by President Jacques Chirac to resume nuclear testing in French Polynesia this fall after a three-year moratorium. Mr. Chirac says his decision is irrevocable.The week before last, 47 Japanese lawmakers, many of them prominent members of parties in the coalition government, called for a boycott of French luxury goods, a threat that carries weight, given the affection of millions of Japanese consumers for brand-name French fashion, perfumes and liquor.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen | May 9, 1993
The word "quilt" comes from the Latin "culcita," meaning stuffed sack or cushion. Quilting refers to the stitching holding together three layers: a pieced or appliqued cover, filling and backing. The earliest evidence of quilting is a circa-3400 B.C. carved ivory figure in the British Museum of an Egyptian pharaoh wearing what looks like a quilted mantle.Quilted clothing and bedding, primarily professionally made luxury goods for the wealthy, are mentioned in 13th-century French and Dutch accounts.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- When South Koreans observe the world's attempt to choke the flow of French cognac, designer watches, flashy cars and other luxuries to North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il, they find themselves in a familiar situation. Bitterly divided. The call by the United Nations Security Council to ban exports of luxury goods to North Korea has been met with a certain satisfaction in capitals such as Washington and Tokyo, landing at least a quick jab in negotiations over Pyongyang's nuclear program that resemble boxers in an endless clinch.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
Scott Greatorex cannot wait to sail the Chesapeake Bay in his new 25-foot luxury yacht with gorgeous teak paneling, two cabins, a galley, a flat-screen TV and enough nautical gadgets to man the vessel alone if he so desired. He can already picture overnight stays and strolls with his family along Main Street stores this spring since the Wind Orchid also happens to be docked on an enviable piece of real estate on Spa Creek near the heart of historic Annapolis. To do it on his own, it would cost $180,000 just to buy the same Catalina sailboat, plus thousands more in maintenance, slip fees, insurance and other costs -- making such a luxurious hobby far out of reach for a 49-year-old manager at NASA.
BUSINESS
By Thomas S. Mulligan and Thomas S. Mulligan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2005
NEW YORK - At the Sherry-Lehmann wine shop on Madison Avenue, $500 bottles of Bordeaux are selling at a clip that owner Michael Aaron figures is 7 percent ahead of 2003's pace. "It's instant gratification," Aaron said last week, "and why not get it?" The reason for the increase: Wall Street securities firms have been shelling out their annual bonuses, the discretionary six- and seven-figure payouts that can account for up to 90 percent of an investment banker's or bond trader's income.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 13, 2004
PARIS - A French court has ordered Morgan Stanley to pay 30 million euros, or $38 million, to LVMH Moet Hennessey Louis Vuitton SA, ruling that research by the Wall Street bank defamed LVMH. A lawsuit brought by LVMH contended that the luxury goods analyst for Morgan Stanley had issued biased research to help its investment banking client, Gucci Group, LVMH's biggest rival. The ruling yesterday echoes concerns that have been raised in the United States and elsewhere over potential conflicts of interest among analyst at investment banks.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan | June 29, 2007
A band of three Baltimore residents bought more than $500,000 worth of imported cars and other luxury goods by using personal information culled from stolen mortgage application files, according to a federal court indictment handed up yesterday. A federal grand jury charged Nekia Ishawn Hunter, 28, Lavon Caldwell, 25, and Faye Marie Jones, 51, with conspiring to commit bank fraud and aggravated identity theft. Separately, another co-conspirator mentioned in the indictment -- Christopher Carson, 39 of Baltimore -- was charged individually through a criminal complaint with identity theft.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | July 13, 2008
Before you pack up the bags and family to scoot off on vacation, remember that burglars are hard at work planning to pay your home a visit while you're gone. The Insurance Information Institute warns that there are 2.15 million burglaries every year. More than 65 percent of those are residential break-ins, and most occur in July and August. Standard homeowner's insurance policies cover theft of personal possessions and damage to the home caused by a break-in. If you own valuable jewelry, or other luxury goods, ask your insurance agent or company representative whether you should consider purchasing a floater to ensure adequate coverage for these items.
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