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By Boston Globe | October 31, 1993
Just when you thought Las Vegas couldn't get any more unbelievable, along comes the Luxor hotel-casino resort.What's so incredible about it? For starters, the building is a 30-story, bronze pyramid with a Sphinx outside and 2,526 rooms inside. And:* Nine Boeing 747s could be stacked in Luxor's atrium, said to be the world's largest at 29 million cubic feet. The resort itself occupies 47 acres on the Strip.* Luxor's "Beam of Light," called the most powerful in the world, shines straight from the top of the pyramid.
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By Toni Stroud and Toni Stroud,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 18, 2004
The night train from Cairo pulled into Luxor station before dawn. Five-fifteen was a hard hour to push the sleep from my eyes, toddle down the companionway, find my footing on the concrete train platform and count my bags before the train chugged on to Aswan without me. Despite offers of assistance from an endless stream of Egyptian porters, I spent a lonely few minutes waiting for the transfer man. I didn't have to take the train to Luxor. I could have settled on a tour with any of several dozen travel companies that would have put me on an airplane for the hour's flight south from Cairo.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 1997
CAIRO, Egypt -- At the butcher shop of the sons of the sheik, the impoverished women of Imbaba line up for camel meat.Verses from the Koran blare from a tape recorder as Ahmed Hawari sharpens his knives. Camel is the only meat he sells. His customers, the poorest of Cairo's poor, can afford no other. This is a dusty warren of mud and brick tenements, 1 million people in two square miles, a shantytown that lacked water, electricity and crudely paved roads until a couple of years ago.Imbaba's astonishing poverty and resentment is not what tourists see when they come to Egypt.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
A Memorable Place Along the Nile, a warm reception By Donna Smither SPECIAL TO THE SUN Kom Ombo, site of an ancient temple midway between Luxor and Aswan in Egypt, honored the crocodile, which was believed to bring the Nile floods each spring. The Nile, a source of fertilization and irrigation, brought people to the temple each year to worship the renewal of agriculture and life in the desert. Today the ruins highlight the Egyptians' sophisticated culture. Our ship, cruising between Luxor and Aswan, had visited the town of Idfu and then docked in view of the Kom Ombo temple.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 6, 1992
There's an instructive exhibit at the City Hall Courtyard Galleries that says something about the losses involved in moving away from essentials.Baltimore has for some time had sister city relationships with two cities in Africa, Gbarnga in Liberia (since 1972) and Luxor in Egypt (since 1982). To mark the decades, there is a show of products from both cities, together with some explanation of the cities, their cultures, and the sister city programs.AThe products in the Luxor part consist largely of non-utilitarian objects -- jewelry, statuettes, reproductions of hieroglyphics, boxes and plates that look ornamental rather than useful.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 6, 1994
How much control do we have over which media images we see?Less than we think.How do those images affect the way we think about the world and ourselves?More than we think.These are the answers suggested by "Luxor v1.0," an installation at Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art that can unhesitatingly be called unique.The installation includes the following: an 18-foot figure based on African and Korean spirit sculptures; a computer-programmed wall of 256 video images that the viewer can manipulate; mural drawings dealing with past, present and future; and assemblages of found objects (such as old mirrors and photographs)
TRAVEL
By Toni Stroud and Toni Stroud,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 18, 2004
The night train from Cairo pulled into Luxor station before dawn. Five-fifteen was a hard hour to push the sleep from my eyes, toddle down the companionway, find my footing on the concrete train platform and count my bags before the train chugged on to Aswan without me. Despite offers of assistance from an endless stream of Egyptian porters, I spent a lonely few minutes waiting for the transfer man. I didn't have to take the train to Luxor. I could have settled on a tour with any of several dozen travel companies that would have put me on an airplane for the hour's flight south from Cairo.
NEWS
By Dr. E. Richard Stiehm | August 24, 1998
I was unusually apprehensive as I boarded the plane to Kenya and Egypt in late July. I was to spend one week in Kenya on an AIDS project and one week in Egypt to see the temples of Luxor with my wife. I was particularly concerned about AIDS exposure to our research team in Kenya and political terrorism in Egypt.I've traveled and worked in Kenya many times, but not since the AIDS epidemic, and I'd never been to Egypt. We had been told that tourism there was nearly nonexistent since the terrorist attack that killed 58 tourists in Luxor in November 1997.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | April 20, 2003
A Memorable Place Along the Nile, a warm reception By Donna Smither SPECIAL TO THE SUN Kom Ombo, site of an ancient temple midway between Luxor and Aswan in Egypt, honored the crocodile, which was believed to bring the Nile floods each spring. The Nile, a source of fertilization and irrigation, brought people to the temple each year to worship the renewal of agriculture and life in the desert. Today the ruins highlight the Egyptians' sophisticated culture. Our ship, cruising between Luxor and Aswan, had visited the town of Idfu and then docked in view of the Kom Ombo temple.
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
LAS VEGAS --In cities and hamlets across America today, folks will be talking about, preparing food for and tuning in to watch the Super Bowl Except here. In Vegas, everyone is bracing for something called the Big Game. Naturally, they are one and the same. It's just that in this city, the term Super Bowl has largely been expunged from the local vocabulary, pretty much under pressure from the NFL. About two years ago, pro football clamped down on the popular casino Super Bowl parties - which had been held for years - contending that many of the gatherings violated the league's copyright on the game.
NEWS
By Dr. E. Richard Stiehm | August 24, 1998
I was unusually apprehensive as I boarded the plane to Kenya and Egypt in late July. I was to spend one week in Kenya on an AIDS project and one week in Egypt to see the temples of Luxor with my wife. I was particularly concerned about AIDS exposure to our research team in Kenya and political terrorism in Egypt.I've traveled and worked in Kenya many times, but not since the AIDS epidemic, and I'd never been to Egypt. We had been told that tourism there was nearly nonexistent since the terrorist attack that killed 58 tourists in Luxor in November 1997.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 1997
CAIRO, Egypt -- At the butcher shop of the sons of the sheik, the impoverished women of Imbaba line up for camel meat.Verses from the Koran blare from a tape recorder as Ahmed Hawari sharpens his knives. Camel is the only meat he sells. His customers, the poorest of Cairo's poor, can afford no other. This is a dusty warren of mud and brick tenements, 1 million people in two square miles, a shantytown that lacked water, electricity and crudely paved roads until a couple of years ago.Imbaba's astonishing poverty and resentment is not what tourists see when they come to Egypt.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 6, 1994
How much control do we have over which media images we see?Less than we think.How do those images affect the way we think about the world and ourselves?More than we think.These are the answers suggested by "Luxor v1.0," an installation at Washington's Corcoran Gallery of Art that can unhesitatingly be called unique.The installation includes the following: an 18-foot figure based on African and Korean spirit sculptures; a computer-programmed wall of 256 video images that the viewer can manipulate; mural drawings dealing with past, present and future; and assemblages of found objects (such as old mirrors and photographs)
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | October 31, 1993
Just when you thought Las Vegas couldn't get any more unbelievable, along comes the Luxor hotel-casino resort.What's so incredible about it? For starters, the building is a 30-story, bronze pyramid with a Sphinx outside and 2,526 rooms inside. And:* Nine Boeing 747s could be stacked in Luxor's atrium, said to be the world's largest at 29 million cubic feet. The resort itself occupies 47 acres on the Strip.* Luxor's "Beam of Light," called the most powerful in the world, shines straight from the top of the pyramid.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | August 6, 1992
There's an instructive exhibit at the City Hall Courtyard Galleries that says something about the losses involved in moving away from essentials.Baltimore has for some time had sister city relationships with two cities in Africa, Gbarnga in Liberia (since 1972) and Luxor in Egypt (since 1982). To mark the decades, there is a show of products from both cities, together with some explanation of the cities, their cultures, and the sister city programs.AThe products in the Luxor part consist largely of non-utilitarian objects -- jewelry, statuettes, reproductions of hieroglyphics, boxes and plates that look ornamental rather than useful.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 19, 1997
CAIRO, Egypt -- Egypt's main Islamic militant group claimed yesterday that its men carried out the attack that left 68 people dead at an ancient temple in Luxor, but said they intended only to take hostages and use them to win the release of their spiritual leader, a blind sheik imprisoned in the United States for plotting to blow up New York landmarks.The al-Gama'a al-Islamiya (Islamic Group) blamed government police for the carnage, according to a statement by the group faxed to news services.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN | January 27, 2006
A Johns Hopkins University archaeological expedition in Egypt has unearthed a 3,400-year-old, life-sized statue of an Egyptian queen. The team found the statue Saturday in Luxor while excavating the site of what was a temple used about 1370 B.C., a period known as the Egyptian New Kingdom. Betsy Bryan, a Hopkins professor of Egyptian art and archaeology, and Fatma Talaat Ismail, a graduate student, found the statue while clearing a temple dedicated to the Egyptian goddess Mut, Bryan said in an e-mail from Egypt.
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