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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2002
During World War II, in a last desperate move to the west, 25 German divisions hurled themselves through a 60-mile front that was barely held by six divisions of U.S. troops. The battle for control of the front that extended from Monschau to Luxembourg began in the early morning of Dec. 16, 1944. For George J. Pinsch, 73, a Baltimore barber and Luxembourg native, December brings back memories of the war, the Nazi occupation of his homeland and the friends and neighbors who disappeared into concentration camps and were never seen again.
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NEWS
December 2, 2013
BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Luxembourg City's mayor Xavier Bettel is slated to become the country's next prime minister, following the end of coalition talks on Friday that usher in a Liberal government for the first time in decades. Bettel's swearing-in on December 4 will be part of a week that includes a meeting of a national Malay organization, a campaign-style visit to South Carolina by Texas Governor Rick Perry and the lighting of the Capitol Christmas tree in Washington. Stories related to this gallery: Liberals to lead Luxembourg as coalition talks succeed Underwood getting 'hate tweets' over 'Sound of Music' role When life spirals out of control, Salvation Army helps provide stability In the Gandhi political bastion, India's rural poor eye Modi's promise The agreement between Bettel's Democratic Party, the Socialists and the Greens brings an end to the 19 years in office of Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Union's longest-serving head of government.
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NEWS
By Jeff Gerth and Jeff Gerth,New York Times News Service | July 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bank of Credit and Commerc International, which was seized last week by international regulators, was used for Central Intelligence Agency operations, according to U.S. government and bank documents as well as current and former government and bank officials.The bank was also involved in secret arms deals, including the covert sale of American arms to Iran in 1986, according to the documents and the officials.Before its collapse, the banking company used its Luxembourg license to offer private financial services to individuals and, at its peak, operated in more than 70 countries, many of whose governments were customers of the bank.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 3, 2009
Poor Nelly. She's 13, hopelessly in love with the prince of Luxembourg and desperately in need of a good jump shot. What's a girl to do? In Anna Justice's delightful Max Minsky and Me, Sunday's offering in the 21st annual Baltimore Jewish Film Festival, the answer is clear: get someone to teach her how to play basketball, so she can get on her school team and make it to the big tournament in Luxembourg, where the hunky 16-year-old prince, a big-time hoops...
TRAVEL
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Chicago Tribune | May 13, 2007
OK, so it isn't Paris. This city -- one of two European Cultural Capitals for 2007 and capital of the richest per-capita-income country on the planet -- is pretty nice. Like all worthwhile European cities, this is a center of commerce -- but also a city of beautiful fruit stands and pastry shops, of historic churches and requisite statues and back streets worth poking around in, and of outdoor places to sip a cup of coffee or a glass of wine or a local brew while furtively enjoying the passing scenery.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1994
BCCI creditors offered paymentThe government and ruling family of Abu Dhabi, the biggest shareholder in now-collapsed BCCI, yesterday offered a new $1.8 billion proposal to pay creditors of the rogue bank.A previous offer valued at $1.7 billion was approved by a big majority of BCCI shareholders. But a court in Luxembourg killed the deal because the terms seemed too favorable to Abu Dhabi, an oil-rich member of the United Arab Emirates.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | October 23, 1991
PARIS -- Europeans took a decisive step yesterday toward building a unified Europe, agreeing to create the world's largest trading bloc, embracing 380 million Western European consumers from the Arctic Circle to the shores of the Mediterranean.The 12-nation European Community, now the world's largest trading bloc, and the seven-member European Free Trade Association concluded two years of negotiations in Luxembourg early yesterday.
NEWS
August 27, 2007
ROBERT H. JOHNSON, 84 Associated Press executive Robert H. Johnson, a champion for open government and a former Associated Press executive who during a 42-year career wrote AP's first bulletin on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, died Saturday in New Mexico. After retiring from the news cooperative in 1988, Mr. Johnson helped start the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government and made a new career out of fighting for public access to government meetings and records. Mr. Johnson suffered a stroke Saturday morning as he prepared to go to work at the foundation, where he served as executive director.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 27, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Iceland has no military. Luxembourg has no air force. Greece doesn't want to bomb a neighbor. And the three other nations not contributing forces to the NATO air war against Serbia have only been alliance members for two weeks.But those six countries, including the new members -- Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic -- bridle at the suggestion that they are not full partners in the allied attack."What Greece is doing," said Alexander Philon, the Greek ambassador to the United States, "and what we decided a long time ago to do with the full agreement of NATO, is to open all of our ports, roads and airfields to the mission but not get involved directly in the actual bombing of our neighbor.
SPORTS
July 13, 1992
LUXEMBOURG -- The Tour de France keeps moving around, jumping from one country to another. However, the contenders remain the same.After the eighth stage finished at Koblenz, Germany, the cycling race made a quick jump to Luxembourg last night for today's time trial as all the contenders jockeyed for position.Three-time champion Greg LeMond, 1991 winner Miguel Indurain and world champion Gianni Bugno kept one eye on the route and one on each other during yesterday's eighth stage, and more of the same was expected in today's 41-mile time trial.
NEWS
August 27, 2007
ROBERT H. JOHNSON, 84 Associated Press executive Robert H. Johnson, a champion for open government and a former Associated Press executive who during a 42-year career wrote AP's first bulletin on the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, died Saturday in New Mexico. After retiring from the news cooperative in 1988, Mr. Johnson helped start the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government and made a new career out of fighting for public access to government meetings and records. Mr. Johnson suffered a stroke Saturday morning as he prepared to go to work at the foundation, where he served as executive director.
TRAVEL
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Chicago Tribune | May 13, 2007
OK, so it isn't Paris. This city -- one of two European Cultural Capitals for 2007 and capital of the richest per-capita-income country on the planet -- is pretty nice. Like all worthwhile European cities, this is a center of commerce -- but also a city of beautiful fruit stands and pastry shops, of historic churches and requisite statues and back streets worth poking around in, and of outdoor places to sip a cup of coffee or a glass of wine or a local brew while furtively enjoying the passing scenery.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 10, 2006
LONDON -- Mittal Steel may be finished with the friendly approach. Mittal, the world's largest steel company, said yesterday that it planned to take its $27 billion bid for its rival Arcelor directly to shareholders as soon as next week, after an offer to sweeten the deal received no response from Arcelor's management. Mittal said it was open to reducing family control over the company, splitting management and the board evenly with Arcelor, and sweetening the price if Arcelor's management would discuss a deal.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | December 24, 2005
At Christmas 1944, World War II Sunpapers correspondent Lee McCardell found himself reporting the largest land battle of World War II, when 25 German divisions attacked six U.S. divisions. The furious battle for the Ardennes, the last great German thrust against Allied forces, exploded along the Belgian border early in December and was fought during one of the worst European winters in memory. On Dec. 23, McCardell's thoughts traveled some 3,000 miles across the Atlantic to his family on Wilmslow Road in Roland Park, warm and safe from the horrors of war. It had been three years since he had left Baltimore, and as the war ground on, he was assigned to cover Gen. George S. Patton's 3rd Army.
NEWS
By Lauren Harner and Lauren Harner,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2004
When sportscaster Jim McKay went to barber George Pinsch for his monthly haircut, there was one topic Pinsch always liked to discuss -- Luxembourg's one-man Olympics team. McKay, a former ABC announcer best known for his Olympics commentary and as the voice of ABC's Wide World of Sports, was always tickled by Pinsch's interest in the Olympics program of Luxembourg, the country where Pinsch grew up. "He liked to talk about sports in Luxembourg," McKay said. "It was just a great place to get your hair cut."
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2002
During World War II, in a last desperate move to the west, 25 German divisions hurled themselves through a 60-mile front that was barely held by six divisions of U.S. troops. The battle for control of the front that extended from Monschau to Luxembourg began in the early morning of Dec. 16, 1944. For George J. Pinsch, 73, a Baltimore barber and Luxembourg native, December brings back memories of the war, the Nazi occupation of his homeland and the friends and neighbors who disappeared into concentration camps and were never seen again.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | August 31, 1991
Winter always puts a chill on the pocketbooks of airlines as business slips in the off-season, but Icelandair announced yesterday fall and winter fare discounts that it hopes will warm up its business at Baltimore-Washington International Airport."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | December 24, 2005
At Christmas 1944, World War II Sunpapers correspondent Lee McCardell found himself reporting the largest land battle of World War II, when 25 German divisions attacked six U.S. divisions. The furious battle for the Ardennes, the last great German thrust against Allied forces, exploded along the Belgian border early in December and was fought during one of the worst European winters in memory. On Dec. 23, McCardell's thoughts traveled some 3,000 miles across the Atlantic to his family on Wilmslow Road in Roland Park, warm and safe from the horrors of war. It had been three years since he had left Baltimore, and as the war ground on, he was assigned to cover Gen. George S. Patton's 3rd Army.
SPORTS
By Bonnie DeSimone and Bonnie DeSimone,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 8, 2002
LUXEMBOURG - As expected, the yellow jersey changed backs yesterday. Unexpectedly, it passed from cycling's biggest star to a virtually unknown young pro. Swiss rider Rubens Bertogliati sprinted across the finish ahead of Lance Armstrong and the rest of the main pack to win Stage 1, a tedious, hilly 119.4-mile leg that began and ended in Luxembourg. Bertogliati, who streaked past star German sprinter Erik Zabel with less than one mile remaining, also took the leader's yellow jersey from Armstrong, who won Saturday's prologue.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
BIGOTRY among public officials is shocking. But that's the only way to explain why five Republican senators blocked the appointment of James C. Hormel as U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg for a year and a half.It wasn't that Mr. Hormel lacked qualifications. He's a former dean of the prestigious University of Chicago Law School. No, Mr. Hormel's "sin," in the eyes of Majority Leader Trent Lott and four other Republicans, was his sexual orientation: He's openly gay.That didn't bother the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which approved the Hormel nomination, 16-2.
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