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NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- After a lengthy and difficult search, President Bush has tapped a three-star Army general as his new "war czar," with full White House authority to pull together increasingly frayed federal efforts to deal with protracted military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Lt. Gen. Douglas Lute, the operations director for the Pentagon's Joint Chiefs of Staff, will fill the job, which is part of the White House National Security Council, administration officials said. He would be an assistant to the president, empowered by Bush to secure cooperation, support and personnel for the Pentagon's war efforts from across the federal government.
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NEWS
By William Pfaff | August 20, 2007
PARIS -- The question of reviving military conscription in the United States made a fleeting reappearance in the American national debate recently, with thus far curiously little reaction. Lt. Gen. Douglas Lute, named in June as President Bush's "war czar," gave his first interview Aug. 10, to National Public Radio, subsequently re-broadcast on international television. But his remarks on the draft seem to have vanished into the void of news Washington does not want to hear. Questioned about manpower constraints in the two wars he oversees, General Lute said that future manpower demands, in given circumstances, might make it necessary to resort again to the draft, last used in the Vietnam War and ended by Richard Nixon in 1973: "I think that it makes sense, certainly, to consider [conscription]
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 22, 2007
William Robinson Cook, a retired French horn and lute player who also restored and repaired instruments, died Sunday of a heart attack at his Towson home. He was 76. Mr. Cook was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1949 graduate of City College and attended Western Maryland College. During the Korean War, he enlisted in the Navy and served aboard the battleship USS Missouri as a member of the ship's band. "He also told stories of being a gunner and an ammunition passer working far below the waterline of the ship," said his wife of eight years, the former Nedra Poe. "Wherever he was and whatever he did, Bill could find the quixotic and interesting to remember and relate."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | June 22, 2007
William Robinson Cook, a retired French horn and lute player who also restored and repaired instruments, died Sunday of a heart attack at his Towson home. He was 76. Mr. Cook was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1949 graduate of City College and attended Western Maryland College. During the Korean War, he enlisted in the Navy and served aboard the battleship USS Missouri as a member of the ship's band. "He also told stories of being a gunner and an ammunition passer working far below the waterline of the ship," said his wife of eight years, the former Nedra Poe. "Wherever he was and whatever he did, Bill could find the quixotic and interesting to remember and relate."
NEWS
April 17, 2004
Joseph Iadone, 89, an early-music specialist and recording artist who was among the first in postwar America to popularize the lute, died March 23 in New Haven, Conn. Largely self-taught, Mr. Iadone was a master on the lute, the delicate ancestor of the guitar that was common in Europe into the 18th century but had become obscure by the 20th century.
NEWS
By Charles A. Stevenson | May 25, 2007
Through a quirk in the law, the Senate has an opportunity to review White House management of the war in Iraq - and perhaps, at the same time, to institutionalize the practice of making the president's top advisers more accountable to Congress. Newly named "war czar" Lt. Gen. Douglas Lute cannot take over his duties until he is confirmed by the Senate. The other White House officials running the war, from national security adviser Stephen J. Hadley on down, are exempt from congressional scrutiny because they are considered "advisers" to the president - not accountable policymakers - and their jobs are not written into law. If the president had chosen a civilian, or even a military retiree, the Senate would have had no say. But to keep his three-star rank, which administration officials seem to believe is necessary to whip the Pentagon and State Department into line, General Lute needs another Senate vote.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
Dawn C. Culbertson, a composer and performer who had been the overnight host of a classical music radio program in Baltimore, died of an apparent heart attack Thursday after an evening of English country dancing at a Pikesville church. The Charles Village resident was 53. Born in Baltimore and raised on Glenkirk Road, Ms. Culbertson was a 1969 graduate of Towson High School and earned a bachelor's degree from what is now Towson University. She had a master's degree in composition from the Peabody Conservatory.
NEWS
April 27, 1993
The Western Maryland College Madrigal Singers will present an evening of Renaissance vocal music, lute songs and a recent piece at 7 p.m. today in Baker Chapel. The one-hour performance is free.The 12 students who make up the madrigal group will perform several selections from the Renaissance, when composers set nonreligious poetry to choral music called madrigals. These works were among the most popular of their day, and along with opera are considered to be among the most important cultural developments of the period.
NEWS
May 18, 2007
The idea of a "war czar" is so peculiar that it's hard to take seriously, but the White House has tapped a decidedly serious officer for the role, a man who seems to have a clear-eyed view of the mess in Iraq. Lt. Gen. Douglas E. Lute appears to understand that the problems the United States faces there are essentially political ones - violent, but political - and won't be solved simply by the application of more ordnance. His job is to get the Defense and State departments working together, and to identify the chief daily problem every morning and have it solved by afternoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2003
Last month, audiences at Washington's Arena Stage got to see the world premiere of Shakespeare in Hollywood, Ken Ludwig's sparkling take on the filming of Max Reinhardt's 1935 movie A Midsummer Night's Dream. Now Washington's Shakespeare Theatre is offering the inspiration for Ludwig's play and Reinhardt's movie. Mark Lamos, former longtime artistic director of Connecticut's Hartford Stage, is staging a production of Midsummer that emphasizes the theme of change. In keeping with this, designer Leiko Fuseya has created a set that deliberately muddies the boundaries between Athens and the forest, the real and the unreal.
NEWS
By Charles A. Stevenson | May 25, 2007
Through a quirk in the law, the Senate has an opportunity to review White House management of the war in Iraq - and perhaps, at the same time, to institutionalize the practice of making the president's top advisers more accountable to Congress. Newly named "war czar" Lt. Gen. Douglas Lute cannot take over his duties until he is confirmed by the Senate. The other White House officials running the war, from national security adviser Stephen J. Hadley on down, are exempt from congressional scrutiny because they are considered "advisers" to the president - not accountable policymakers - and their jobs are not written into law. If the president had chosen a civilian, or even a military retiree, the Senate would have had no say. But to keep his three-star rank, which administration officials seem to believe is necessary to whip the Pentagon and State Department into line, General Lute needs another Senate vote.
NEWS
May 18, 2007
The idea of a "war czar" is so peculiar that it's hard to take seriously, but the White House has tapped a decidedly serious officer for the role, a man who seems to have a clear-eyed view of the mess in Iraq. Lt. Gen. Douglas E. Lute appears to understand that the problems the United States faces there are essentially political ones - violent, but political - and won't be solved simply by the application of more ordnance. His job is to get the Defense and State departments working together, and to identify the chief daily problem every morning and have it solved by afternoon.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- After a lengthy and difficult search, President Bush has tapped a three-star Army general as his new "war czar," with full White House authority to pull together increasingly frayed federal efforts to deal with protracted military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Lt. Gen. Douglas Lute, the operations director for the Pentagon's Joint Chiefs of Staff, will fill the job, which is part of the White House National Security Council, administration officials said. He would be an assistant to the president, empowered by Bush to secure cooperation, support and personnel for the Pentagon's war efforts from across the federal government.
NEWS
September 6, 2006
A section of Crownsville has been transformed into the 16th-century English village of Revel Grove for the Maryland Ren aissance Festival. On weekends through Oct. 22, visitors to the fair can enjoy games, music, crafts and other attractions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 16, 2005
You say you want to learn to play the piano? No problem! Find dozens of qualified instructors right in the phone book. How about flute -- or guitar, or clarinet, or bass fiddle or accordion? No problem! Somewhere, somebody is teaching just about any instrument you can name. And that's not even mentioning all the specialty shops that sell everything from sheet music to self-help manuals, guitar picks to drumsticks, saxophones to sousaphones. Now put yourself back 500 years or so to the High Renaissance, when every knight and swain yearned to woo his lady with soulful riffs on the lute.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
TUCSON, Ariz. -- Arizona coach Lute Olson has kidded this season that he finally got to put his master's degree in educational psychology to use, largely from coaching Salim Stoudamire the past four years. Of all the players Olson has coached in a 32-year career on the college level, the 6-foot-1 senior guard certainly has been the most challenging. Olson tried everything from tough love to an occasional soft touch, but little seemed to work. It finally took an ultimatum from a coach known to be frosty to a player known to be surly to finally get Stoudamire to fulfill his potential.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | June 19, 1991
The International Brass Quintet Festival holds Maryland Brass Days, a free weekend workshop for high school, college and adult amateur brass players, at the Peabody Conservatory Friday through Sunday.The event ends with a free concert involving 60 players at 3:30 p.m. Sunday at the Friedberg Concert Hall. The workshop allows players to rehearse and learn with The Annapolis Brass Quintet. The quintet itself will play new works for brass at 2 p.m. Saturday in Peabody's North Hall. Interested players should call 235-4302 for information and registration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 16, 2005
You say you want to learn to play the piano? No problem! Find dozens of qualified instructors right in the phone book. How about flute -- or guitar, or clarinet, or bass fiddle or accordion? No problem! Somewhere, somebody is teaching just about any instrument you can name. And that's not even mentioning all the specialty shops that sell everything from sheet music to self-help manuals, guitar picks to drumsticks, saxophones to sousaphones. Now put yourself back 500 years or so to the High Renaissance, when every knight and swain yearned to woo his lady with soulful riffs on the lute.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 1, 2004
Dawn C. Culbertson, a composer and performer who had been the overnight host of a classical music radio program in Baltimore, died of an apparent heart attack Thursday after an evening of English country dancing at a Pikesville church. The Charles Village resident was 53. Born in Baltimore and raised on Glenkirk Road, Ms. Culbertson was a 1969 graduate of Towson High School and earned a bachelor's degree from what is now Towson University. She had a master's degree in composition from the Peabody Conservatory.
NEWS
April 17, 2004
Joseph Iadone, 89, an early-music specialist and recording artist who was among the first in postwar America to popularize the lute, died March 23 in New Haven, Conn. Largely self-taught, Mr. Iadone was a master on the lute, the delicate ancestor of the guitar that was common in Europe into the 18th century but had become obscure by the 20th century.
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