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Luray Caverns

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TRAVEL
August 8, 2010
Discovery Day Celebration at Luray Caverns in Virginia What: This event marks the 132nd anniversary of the discovery of the Luray Caverns with a day of special events, including the official opening of the Luray Valley Museum. The highlight of the day is typically the Grand Illuminiation, a tradition dating back to 1870s in which guides, dressed in costumes of a bygone era, tell of the caverns' storied past as visitors wander through special chambers brilliantly lit by thousands of candles.
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TRAVEL
August 8, 2010
Discovery Day Celebration at Luray Caverns in Virginia What: This event marks the 132nd anniversary of the discovery of the Luray Caverns with a day of special events, including the official opening of the Luray Valley Museum. The highlight of the day is typically the Grand Illuminiation, a tradition dating back to 1870s in which guides, dressed in costumes of a bygone era, tell of the caverns' storied past as visitors wander through special chambers brilliantly lit by thousands of candles.
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NEWS
June 15, 1993
Firebombs thrown at Bates MiddleFirebombs have been tossed into a shop room at Bates Middle School in Annapolis twice in the past week, authorities said.The school's alarm went off shortly before 9:30 p.m. Sunday, police said. When firefighters and police arrived, they saw smoke pouring from the back of the building.Fire officials have ruled the fire an arson. The blaze, which was extinguished within 15 minutes, caused about $2,000 in damage.Late Wednesday night or early Thursday morning, two jars full of flammable liquids were thrown into the shop.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 4, 2000
I HAVE just returned from a visit to the famous Luray Caverns in Virginia, discovered in 1878 by a tinsmith who gazed at the awesome subterranean formations before him and thought: Someday this will be the site of a really cheesy gift shop. Actually, I hadn't been in a cave in years, not since a fifth-grade field trip to the famous Howe Caverns and its cheesy gift shop in upstate New York. But touring the Luray Caverns with my wife and 8-year-old son, I was again reminded of that old caving axiom: If you've seen one stalactite or stalagmite, you've pretty much seen them all. Oh, sure, the formations are breathtaking in their beauty.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | May 4, 2000
I HAVE just returned from a visit to the famous Luray Caverns in Virginia, discovered in 1878 by a tinsmith who gazed at the awesome subterranean formations before him and thought: Someday this will be the site of a really cheesy gift shop. Actually, I hadn't been in a cave in years, not since a fifth-grade field trip to the famous Howe Caverns and its cheesy gift shop in upstate New York. But touring the Luray Caverns with my wife and 8-year-old son, I was again reminded of that old caving axiom: If you've seen one stalactite or stalagmite, you've pretty much seen them all. Oh, sure, the formations are breathtaking in their beauty.
FEATURES
By Ronnell M. Maybank | June 18, 1995
See the cavernsImagine strolling 164 feet beneath the earth's surface to view ancient limestone caverns and sparkling pools of water.Instead of taking the family to the movies this weekend, take a trip to see the natural wonders of Luray Caverns, a registered Natural Landmark in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley.For $11 per adult, $5 per child ages 7-13 and no cost to kids under 7 the entire family can visit Luray Caverns. Guided tours, departing every few minutes, visit the Great Stalacpipe Organ, the world's largest natural musical instrument, Dream Lake, Wishing Well and Fried Eggs, a group of monumental formations sunny side up.Included in the admission fee is an exhibit of antique cars and carriages and a concert at 8 p.m. every Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday at at Luray's Singing Towers, one of the country's major carillons, with 47 bells.
FEATURES
By KATHERINE DREW DEBOALT | July 18, 1993
In the shade of the wide, arched veranda of the Luray courthouse, a notice for a senior basketball league is posted on the same bulletin board as petitions for divorce.In Luray, the seat of Page County, Va., it seems folks have better things to do than spend their days in court. The white brick courthouse has only a part-time chief prosecutor and a single criminal courtroom. There, last month, was held the first murder trial in town in five years. During the most recent term, court stayed in session the entire three months without need for a single jury.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1998
They're millions of years old, hundreds of feet below the ground and dripping with calcium carbonate formations. And many of them are just a day trip away from Baltimore.Caverns are natural wonders carved out by underground rivers millions of years ago. Water that has seeped into the limestone caves creates formations that crystallize. The crystals come in many shapes and sizes: columns, ribbons, stalactites (hanging crystals) and stalagmites (crystals that grow up from the ground).Below is a list of caverns found in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.
NEWS
January 12, 2005
Thomas S. "Hawk" Weaver Sr., a retired supervisor for the city Department of Public Works' Bureau of Solid Waste, died of pneumonia Thursday at Genesis ElderCare Multi-Medical Center in Rodgers Forge. He was 82. Mr. Weaver was born in Baltimore and raised in the Wilson Park neighborhood. He attended city public schools and later earned his General Educational Development diploma. He began working for the sanitation department in the 1940s and retired as a supervisor in the early 1980s.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1995
For the fourth consecutive year, 13-year-old Heather Schulman visited historic Jamestown, Va., but this time she didn't set foot outside her Arnold community.On Friday, Heather and 19 other Severn River Junior High School students watched a satellite broadcast of archaeologists digging the Colonial settlement from the comfortable confines of the AVCOM Center at Anne Arundel Community College."This is better because we're watching it live and we can see everything right from here," said Heather, an eighth-grader.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Forman and Judith Forman,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1998
They're millions of years old, hundreds of feet below the ground and dripping with calcium carbonate formations. And many of them are just a day trip away from Baltimore.Caverns are natural wonders carved out by underground rivers millions of years ago. Water that has seeped into the limestone caves creates formations that crystallize. The crystals come in many shapes and sizes: columns, ribbons, stalactites (hanging crystals) and stalagmites (crystals that grow up from the ground).Below is a list of caverns found in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.
FEATURES
By Ronnell M. Maybank | June 18, 1995
See the cavernsImagine strolling 164 feet beneath the earth's surface to view ancient limestone caverns and sparkling pools of water.Instead of taking the family to the movies this weekend, take a trip to see the natural wonders of Luray Caverns, a registered Natural Landmark in Virginia's Shenandoah Valley.For $11 per adult, $5 per child ages 7-13 and no cost to kids under 7 the entire family can visit Luray Caverns. Guided tours, departing every few minutes, visit the Great Stalacpipe Organ, the world's largest natural musical instrument, Dream Lake, Wishing Well and Fried Eggs, a group of monumental formations sunny side up.Included in the admission fee is an exhibit of antique cars and carriages and a concert at 8 p.m. every Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday and Sunday at at Luray's Singing Towers, one of the country's major carillons, with 47 bells.
FEATURES
By KATHERINE DREW DEBOALT | July 18, 1993
In the shade of the wide, arched veranda of the Luray courthouse, a notice for a senior basketball league is posted on the same bulletin board as petitions for divorce.In Luray, the seat of Page County, Va., it seems folks have better things to do than spend their days in court. The white brick courthouse has only a part-time chief prosecutor and a single criminal courtroom. There, last month, was held the first murder trial in town in five years. During the most recent term, court stayed in session the entire three months without need for a single jury.
NEWS
June 15, 1993
Firebombs thrown at Bates MiddleFirebombs have been tossed into a shop room at Bates Middle School in Annapolis twice in the past week, authorities said.The school's alarm went off shortly before 9:30 p.m. Sunday, police said. When firefighters and police arrived, they saw smoke pouring from the back of the building.Fire officials have ruled the fire an arson. The blaze, which was extinguished within 15 minutes, caused about $2,000 in damage.Late Wednesday night or early Thursday morning, two jars full of flammable liquids were thrown into the shop.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Staff Writer | October 29, 1993
For 10 years, Jerome Louison built his woodworking business in the basement of his Highland home, handcrafting everything from golf clubs to bedroom sets."
NEWS
By Larry Sturgill and Larry Sturgill,Contributing Writer | March 7, 1993
A cave in Howard County? Yes, but only if you use a little imagination. It's called Camel's Den, and it's the county's only underground attraction.Let's be clear, though -- there is absolutely no similarity between this tiny cave near Marriottsville and Woodstock and an attraction such as Virginia's majestic Luray Caverns.In fact, Camel's Den is little more than a shallow rock shelter, 6 feet wide, 8 feet high and 15 feet long, carved from a highly crystallized sedimentary rock known as Cockeysville marble.
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