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By Dr. Simeon Margolis | April 2, 1991
Q: I went to my doctor several weeks ago because of a persistent rash on my face. He said the results of some blood test showed that I have lupus. My husband and I would like to know more about this disease.A: Lupus may show up in two forms. One form is a rather benign disorder limited to coin-shaped lesions of the skin. Because the second type of lupus may involve many organs throughout the body, it is called systemic lupus erythematosus or SLE. Skin lesions are also frequent in SLE; they usually occur on areas exposed to sunlight.
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NEWS
By Don Markus | don.markus@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
B y her late 20s, Perneita Farrar seemed to have overcome many of her life's earlier struggles. An unwed mother at 16, Farrar went on to graduate from the University of Maryland with a degree in public health and a minor in biology. She was working at Montgomery General Hospital in Olney, managing the health education and community outreach departments. On the side, Farrar worked as a health educator for Kaiser Permanente. But for Farrar, neither her educational background nor her professional experience prepared her for what has become a life-changing battle with lupus.
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NEWS
By NEWSDAY | February 1, 2006
NEW YORK -- For years, doctors have been vexed when it comes to treating people with the worst form of lupus, but new research suggests that temporarily obliterating the immune system, then rescuing patients with their own stem cells, can put them into long-term remission. Lupus has no cure and is an autoimmune disease, an insidious condition in which turncoat components of the immune system attack the body, zeroing in on vital organs. The disease was once invariably fatal, but since the latter part of the 20th century doctors have reduced deaths through aggressive treatments based on tamping down the immune system - therapies that have worked in all but the worst cases.
NEWS
July 20, 2009
* The Lupus Foundation of America Greater Washington Chapter will host a kickoff party from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday at Della Rose's Tavern, 1501 S. Clinton St., Baltimore. Proceeds will benefit Baltimore's second annual Walk for Lupus Now, to be held in September. Tickets are $15 per adult and $9 per child; $5 and $4 per ticket will benefit the upcoming walk. Go to baltimorelupuswalk.org. * Laurel Regional Hospital and the Laurel Lions Club will hold a blood drive in conjunction with the American Red Cross from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Aug. 4 in the hospital's J.R. Jones Conference Room at 7300 Van Dusen Road, Laurel.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1994
The only hints that Jacqueline Pressey suffers from lupus are the elbow-length white satin gloves and broad-brimmed straw hat she wears outdoors.If she didn't wear the protective clothing, a red bumpy rash would develop on her face and her hands would swell so severely that she could not comb her two daughters' hair.But after two years of adhering to a strict diet that stresses vegetables, noncitrus fruits and vitamins, the 33-year-old Elkridge woman no longer relies on medication and has returned teaching aerobics -- an activity she thought she would never do again.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
Human Genome Sciences Inc. outlined plans yesterday for taking its lupus drug LymphoStat-B into the final phase of clinical trials before year-end, putting it among a handful of so-called "genomics" drugs to reach that stage. If successful, the drug would be the first lupus treatment approved in 40 years. It's "a critically important step in the evolution of HGS," Chief Executive Officer H. Thomas Watkins said during a conference call yesterday. The 14-year-old company has struggled for years to profit from genetic information, beginning as a research and discovery business and transitioning into drug development.
NEWS
By Jodi Bizar and Jodi Bizar,Contributing writer | May 26, 1991
The painful disease Lupus hasn't held 16-year-old Andrea Y. Forde back.At the June 7 commencement for Edgewood High School, she'll bethe class valedictorian and, despite undergoing chemotherapy and missing many days of school, the young woman has managed to earn a 3.9 grade-point average. You can also catch her playing the violin in the school orchestra and helping to run the school science club."I just try and keep in mind what's important," she said, when asked how she managed to get such high grades while suffering from a degenerative disease of the kidney.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 2, 2005
WASHINGTON - An active ingredient in a new heart failure drug tailored for African-Americans can increase the risk of developing a form of lupus, a debilitating disease that strikes black women in disproportionately high numbers. BiDil was officially launched yesterday by Massachusetts-based NitroMed, Inc. as the first drug intended for use by patients in a particular ethnic group. The Food and Drug Administration approved it June 23. But one of its two key ingredients, a generic compound known as hydralazine hydrochloride, has long been known to cause lupus in some patients, according to FDA documents and interviews with doctors.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 13, 2007
Doctors first gave Karen Banfield Evans a year of chemotherapy, even though she doesn't have cancer. Then, they switched her to a drug that prevents organ rejection, though she has never had a transplant. Add into the mix several blood pressure reducers, a steroid, various nutritional supplements along with a multivitamin, and the count of pills Evans takes per day comes up to 10 - none of which was designed to treat her disease. Evans has lupus, an often debilitating illness in which the immune system attacks the body, destroying organs, tissue, joints and quality of life.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 24, 2004
MedImmune Inc. announced yesterday a drug-development partnership with Princeton, N.J.-based Medarex Inc., a deal aimed at giving the Gaithersburg company a foothold in developing treatments for autoimmune diseases such as lupus. MedImmune, one of the few Maryland biotechnology companies with substantial product sales, will be the financier and will take the lead in bringing drug candidates to market. The company derives the bulk of its sales from one product, its Synagis treatment for respiratory infection in infants, and it is trying to reposition its money-losing FluMist.
NEWS
August 31, 2008
Crohn's and Colitis support group to meet The Crohn's and Colitis support group meets at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Christ Our King Presbyterian Church, 10 Lexington Road, Bel Air. The group is lead by a qualified volunteer, nonclinical facilitator. Patients, family and friends are welcome to meetings. No registration is required. The group is run under the auspices of the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America's Maryland Chapter. Information: 800-618-5583. Medical van to provide free screenings Sept.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the sun | April 30, 2008
Fourteen years ago, Julie Ostheller was struggling with her health. The stay-at-home mom - a former grade school teacher - was suffering from a type of lupus. Then a job fell into her lap that turned Ostheller's life, and health, around. A young mother with a degree in early childhood education, Ostheller was asked to be part of a talk on children's literature. "At the end of the conversation, they said, `Would you be interested in being the story lady at Owings Mills [Mall]?'
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporter | August 22, 2007
College Park -- Maryland offensive lineman Scott Burley does not want to research his mother's disease, or know any more about lupus than what she tells him and what he's seen. "As long as she's doing well," he said, "I'm happy." Sabrina Lucas is doing well - her lupus is in remission - and for the first time in a few years, everything seems to be going right for her son, too. Burley, a native of Baltimore and former Woodlawn High standout, was a freshman at Maryland when he learned his mother was diagnosed with a potentially fatal disease that attacks the immune system.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | April 7, 2007
Stacy L. Allen, an attorney who took on disability cases after her own diagnosis with lupus, died of that disease Sunday at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. The Bel Air resident was 46. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville, she was a member of the Class of 1978 at Pikesville High School. After receiving a scholarship from Baltimore Hebrew Congregation for a summer internship in Israel, she developed an interest in the Middle East and international relations. She later returned to Israel for a work-study program and lived in an underground shelter during an outbreak of hostilities with Lebanese-based forces.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 13, 2007
Doctors first gave Karen Banfield Evans a year of chemotherapy, even though she doesn't have cancer. Then, they switched her to a drug that prevents organ rejection, though she has never had a transplant. Add into the mix several blood pressure reducers, a steroid, various nutritional supplements along with a multivitamin, and the count of pills Evans takes per day comes up to 10 - none of which was designed to treat her disease. Evans has lupus, an often debilitating illness in which the immune system attacks the body, destroying organs, tissue, joints and quality of life.
NEWS
November 29, 2006
On November 20, 2006 LEONARD J. MASON, JR., of Reisterstown.M-BM- Beloved husband of the late Carolyn (nee Via) Mason.M-BM- Father of Lisa C. Philipp, Tess M. Kimbro and Cindie L. Bowser.M-BM- Brother of Lucy M. Fink.M-BM- Also survived by four grandchildren. A memorial service will be held on Friday, December 1 at 7:00 P.M., at the ELINE FUNERAL HOME, 11824 Reisterstown Road(at Franklin Boulevard).M-BM- In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Lupus Mid Atlantic, 7400 York Road, Suite 308, Baltimore, MD,21204.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | October 6, 2005
Shares of Human Genome Sciences Inc. fell nearly 30 percent yesterday, the second-biggest percentage decliner on the Nasdaq stock market, after the Rockville biotech company reported disappointing clinical trial results for an experimental lupus treatment. The company's stock closed at $9.87, down from $13.97 a day earlier. With nearly 50 million shares sold yesterday, it traded at 20 times its average volume. That made Human Genome the fourth-most-active stock on the Nasdaq, between computer giants Microsoft Corp.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | April 7, 2007
Stacy L. Allen, an attorney who took on disability cases after her own diagnosis with lupus, died of that disease Sunday at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. The Bel Air resident was 46. Born in Baltimore and raised in Pikesville, she was a member of the Class of 1978 at Pikesville High School. After receiving a scholarship from Baltimore Hebrew Congregation for a summer internship in Israel, she developed an interest in the Middle East and international relations. She later returned to Israel for a work-study program and lived in an underground shelter during an outbreak of hostilities with Lebanese-based forces.
NEWS
August 10, 2006
NATIONAL Left wing gains momentum Anger over the war in Iraq and the failure of Democrats in Washington to effectively counter President Bush and the Republican Congress are fueling a resurgence of the Democrats' liberal wing, say politicians and analysts. pg 1a WORLD 15 Israeli soldiers killed Israel suffered its worst military death toll in a month of fighting in south Lebanon when 15 soldiers were killed during ground skirmishes with Hezbollah guerrillas. pg 12a MARYLAND Steffen testifies Testifying under oath before a legislative committee yesterday, Joseph F. Steffen Jr. said he teamed with the governor's appointments office in targeting workers to be terminated and that their political affiliations informed his recommendations.
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