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NEWS
August 9, 2000
Student: Albert K. Luo, 17 School: Centennial High School Special achievement: Selected as a candidate in the Presidential Scholars Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education based on SAT scores, recommendations from his principal and counselor, high school transcript and activities. What he says about it: "I was honored because I see it as recognition of all the work and effort I have put in throughout high school. To be chosen as a candidate reflects not only academic achievement, but also participation in music and student organizations.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 23, 2013
Amateur Golf Joiner, Luo win titles at Turf Valley Resort; Md. golfers dot top 20 Tyler Joiner of Albany, Ga., won the JoS. A. Bank/David Leadbetter Championship in Ellicott City after a 3-under-par 210 forced a sudden-death playoff against Kevin Conners of Downington, Pa. In the girls division, Julie Luo of Centreville, Va., won with a tournament total of 6-over-par 219. Jake Leavitt of Woodstock tied for fourth with a...
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BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | August 15, 2007
Like many people these days, I have a Facebook account, which I mostly use to stay connected with high school chums and other friends. In the last six months, though, I've also established a professional online presence through LinkedIn.com, a popular career-oriented network. (The site has 13 million members, who can establish a personal account free. LinkedIn charges fees for extended services.) While it's nice to reconnect with old co-workers and see what they're up to career-wise, the idea behind LinkedIn is to help professionals advance their careers.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | August 15, 2007
Like many people these days, I have a Facebook account, which I mostly use to stay connected with high school chums and other friends. In the last six months, though, I've also established a professional online presence through LinkedIn.com, a popular career-oriented network. (The site has 13 million members, who can establish a personal account free. LinkedIn charges fees for extended services.) While it's nice to reconnect with old co-workers and see what they're up to career-wise, the idea behind LinkedIn is to help professionals advance their careers.
FEATURES
By Carina Chocano and Carina Chocano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
Great political upheavals usually get the epic treatment in movies, which tends to flatten wholesale human suffering into cast-of-thousands backdrops for heroic stories of "one ordinary man's extraordinary courage." It's rarer that a film focuses on the effects of large-scale social cataclysms on individuals whose bravery consists of remaining resolutely human and true to themselves, and much more poignant. In Dai Sijie's Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress, which he based on his own best-selling semi-autobiographical novel, two well-bred city boys are shipped off for "re-education" to a remote mountain village in the Sichuan province during China's Cultural Revolution.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 29, 2001
Chinese director Zhang Yimou's "The Road Home," which begins a limited run tonight at the Charles Theatre, is a cinematic ode to the everlasting power of love that offers all sorts of pleasures - director Zhang Yimou's easy lyricism, San Bao's hauntingly evocative score, cinematographer Hou Yong's beautifully sparse images of a remote Chinese village. But perhaps most memorably, it offers the chance to see a young Zhang Ziyi before she became The Next Big Thing on the heels of her starring role in "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."
SPORTS
By PAT O'MALLEY and PAT O'MALLEY,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
COLLEGE PARK -- Senior hitter Sarah Gregorini said, "Centennial prides itself in its depth," and it showed last night in more ways than one at Ritchie Coliseum as the top-ranked Eagles swept second-year Huntingtown of Calvert County, 25-14, 25-22, 25-21, to repeat as Class 3A state volleyball champions. Centennial (19-1) showed deep scoring ability, a deep defense and even got a spark from a recent JV call-up in the third game to further a program that has gone deeper with its coach, Mike Bossom, than any other in state history.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 2004
STEELPOORT, South Africa -- Chinese businessman Hansen Luo came to Africa eight years ago to seek his fortune and found it under a mountainside in South Africa's Limpopo province. It's where his mining company each year claws out 400,000 tons of chrome ore to feed the Chinese economy's insatiable appetite for natural resources, in this case for making stainless steel. Nearby, at this rural mining town's only shopping mall, fortune also has smiled on the Ling brothers. Seven years ago, the brothers came here from China to open the Chinese Clothing Shop, where bins of underwear, racks of colorful dresses and shelves lined with discount stereos -- all made in China -- help satisfy South Africans' demand for cut-rate clothing and electronics.
BUSINESS
By IAN JOHNSON and IAN JOHNSON,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 11, 1996
SHANGHAI -- It took only a minute for 8-year-old Luo Ting to make his mother a McCormick customer."Try some of the delicious dessert jelly," he heard the McCormick hawker say at the entrance of the neighborhood grocery store.Luo took a lump of the wobbly red gelatin and slurped it down. He looked up at his mother, tugged at her sleeve and in a flash she plunked down the equivalent of $1.50 for three of the powdered gelatin mixes.Score a small victory for the world's largest seasoning company as it tries to win over China's 1.2 billion consumers -- one by one.The strategy may be costly but it is typical of how foreign companies slowly make headway in the world's most tempting -- and sometimes the most difficult -- market.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 4, 2003
CHENGLAO, China - Luo Aimei, a 33-year-old mother weakened by illness, lies listlessly in her bed, feverish and coughing. If she were even suspected of having SARS, government officials would probably take her to a hospital for treatment, though she has no money. But Luo knows no one is coming for her, because she doesn't have SARS. She has AIDS. Hundreds of others in this village of about 1,000 have AIDS or are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, and those infected include her husband and, the couple fears, the younger of their two children, a 3 1/2 -year-old boy frequently stricken with fever and coughs.
SPORTS
By PAT O'MALLEY and PAT O'MALLEY,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
COLLEGE PARK -- Senior hitter Sarah Gregorini said, "Centennial prides itself in its depth," and it showed last night in more ways than one at Ritchie Coliseum as the top-ranked Eagles swept second-year Huntingtown of Calvert County, 25-14, 25-22, 25-21, to repeat as Class 3A state volleyball champions. Centennial (19-1) showed deep scoring ability, a deep defense and even got a spark from a recent JV call-up in the third game to further a program that has gone deeper with its coach, Mike Bossom, than any other in state history.
FEATURES
By Carina Chocano and Carina Chocano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
Great political upheavals usually get the epic treatment in movies, which tends to flatten wholesale human suffering into cast-of-thousands backdrops for heroic stories of "one ordinary man's extraordinary courage." It's rarer that a film focuses on the effects of large-scale social cataclysms on individuals whose bravery consists of remaining resolutely human and true to themselves, and much more poignant. In Dai Sijie's Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress, which he based on his own best-selling semi-autobiographical novel, two well-bred city boys are shipped off for "re-education" to a remote mountain village in the Sichuan province during China's Cultural Revolution.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 23, 2004
STEELPOORT, South Africa -- Chinese businessman Hansen Luo came to Africa eight years ago to seek his fortune and found it under a mountainside in South Africa's Limpopo province. It's where his mining company each year claws out 400,000 tons of chrome ore to feed the Chinese economy's insatiable appetite for natural resources, in this case for making stainless steel. Nearby, at this rural mining town's only shopping mall, fortune also has smiled on the Ling brothers. Seven years ago, the brothers came here from China to open the Chinese Clothing Shop, where bins of underwear, racks of colorful dresses and shelves lined with discount stereos -- all made in China -- help satisfy South Africans' demand for cut-rate clothing and electronics.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 4, 2003
CHENGLAO, China - Luo Aimei, a 33-year-old mother weakened by illness, lies listlessly in her bed, feverish and coughing. If she were even suspected of having SARS, government officials would probably take her to a hospital for treatment, though she has no money. But Luo knows no one is coming for her, because she doesn't have SARS. She has AIDS. Hundreds of others in this village of about 1,000 have AIDS or are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, and those infected include her husband and, the couple fears, the younger of their two children, a 3 1/2 -year-old boy frequently stricken with fever and coughs.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 29, 2001
Chinese director Zhang Yimou's "The Road Home," which begins a limited run tonight at the Charles Theatre, is a cinematic ode to the everlasting power of love that offers all sorts of pleasures - director Zhang Yimou's easy lyricism, San Bao's hauntingly evocative score, cinematographer Hou Yong's beautifully sparse images of a remote Chinese village. But perhaps most memorably, it offers the chance to see a young Zhang Ziyi before she became The Next Big Thing on the heels of her starring role in "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon."
NEWS
January 11, 2001
Misguided approach to drugs may explain high murder rate I was intrigued by The Sun's chart showing the city's murders and murder rate per 100,000 from 1812 to 2000 ("Fewer than 300 homicides at last," Jan. 1). The city's current population was reported as 632,681. When you look back in history for a similar population, it came about 1914. The difference is that the murder rate then was about 4.3 per 100,000 residents, as opposed to our current 48.2. The major cause for the difference is attributed to the drug trade.
NEWS
January 11, 2001
Misguided approach to drugs may explain high murder rate I was intrigued by The Sun's chart showing the city's murders and murder rate per 100,000 from 1812 to 2000 ("Fewer than 300 homicides at last," Jan. 1). The city's current population was reported as 632,681. When you look back in history for a similar population, it came about 1914. The difference is that the murder rate then was about 4.3 per 100,000 residents, as opposed to our current 48.2. The major cause for the difference is attributed to the drug trade.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | August 23, 2013
Amateur Golf Joiner, Luo win titles at Turf Valley Resort; Md. golfers dot top 20 Tyler Joiner of Albany, Ga., won the JoS. A. Bank/David Leadbetter Championship in Ellicott City after a 3-under-par 210 forced a sudden-death playoff against Kevin Conners of Downington, Pa. In the girls division, Julie Luo of Centreville, Va., won with a tournament total of 6-over-par 219. Jake Leavitt of Woodstock tied for fourth with a...
NEWS
August 9, 2000
Student: Albert K. Luo, 17 School: Centennial High School Special achievement: Selected as a candidate in the Presidential Scholars Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education based on SAT scores, recommendations from his principal and counselor, high school transcript and activities. What he says about it: "I was honored because I see it as recognition of all the work and effort I have put in throughout high school. To be chosen as a candidate reflects not only academic achievement, but also participation in music and student organizations.
BUSINESS
By IAN JOHNSON and IAN JOHNSON,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 11, 1996
SHANGHAI -- It took only a minute for 8-year-old Luo Ting to make his mother a McCormick customer."Try some of the delicious dessert jelly," he heard the McCormick hawker say at the entrance of the neighborhood grocery store.Luo took a lump of the wobbly red gelatin and slurped it down. He looked up at his mother, tugged at her sleeve and in a flash she plunked down the equivalent of $1.50 for three of the powdered gelatin mixes.Score a small victory for the world's largest seasoning company as it tries to win over China's 1.2 billion consumers -- one by one.The strategy may be costly but it is typical of how foreign companies slowly make headway in the world's most tempting -- and sometimes the most difficult -- market.
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