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By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing WriterUnited Feature Syndicate | March 23, 1993
You needn't worry about cold air damaging your lungs when you exercise in cold weather. The only reports of lung damage from cold air are in people who were unable to get out of the cold, such as American gunners who lay unconscious in the frozen turrets of high-flying World War II bombers or people who were injured in automobile accidents and lay unconscious for hours in the cold.During exercise, your muscles produce so much heat that air inhaled at 40 degrees below zero will be warmed more than 100 degrees before it reaches your lungs.
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NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Orioles have already given Baltimore much to be proud of this week by clinching the American League East division title. Not as well known is another reason for Baltimore to be proud of this amazing organization - for the role that they are playing in the fight against lung cancer ( "Reflecting on memorable scenes from the Orioles' celebration Tuesday," Sept. 17). When Orioles Public Relations Director Monica Barlow died this February of lung cancer, she was only 36 years old. She had spent much of her four-and-a-half-year fight against lung cancer sharing her story in the hope of bringing attention to the critical need for research, some of which helped extend her own life.
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NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1997
Timothy Hutton wanted to be a cartoon artist. Also on his wish list was to play basketball, football and softball.Most of all, he wanted to live -- and his doctor had said that only his strong will to survive kept him going before he received a double-lung transplant last year at the Johns Hopkins Hospital.But on Sunday night, after months of complications, his body rejected the transplanted organs and the Pasadena eighth-grader, who had been in foster care for most of his life, died at age 14.Timothy's problem was bullous emphysema, a severe chronic disease that destroyed his lungs and forced him to often rely on a ventilator to breathe.
SPORTS
September 3, 2014
Weeks after falling awkwardly against the Dallas Cowboys and coughing up blood, Ravens starting cornerback Jimmy Smith proclaimed that he's made a full recovery. Smith suffered a chest contusion against the Cowboys and also had lung issues, but has been practicing since last week and says he's on track to play Sunday against the Cincinnati Bengals at M&T Bank Stadium. Smith said he won't need any extra padding to protect his chest. "I'm absolutely fine," said Smith, who's not listed on the first injury report released Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | June 19, 2008
It was November 2006, and Tim Askew had his hands full just dealing with the idea that his new company's technology could treat esophageal cancer. He hadn't even launched his first product, he had few employees, and revenue was still months away. But then he got a call from Dr. William Krimsky, and his world got a lot more complicated "He single-handedly changed the course of the company," said Askew, who is chief executive of CSA Medical Inc.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2003
Heather Marie Beacham picked up the phone two years ago and heard the words she hoped for and feared most in this world: "We've got some lungs for you." The Dundalk teen-ager, whose lungs were scarred from cystic fibrosis, was so unnerved that she accidentally hung up the phone and began to shake. Her mother wrapped her arms around her 15-year-old daughter's tiny frame, holding Heather and crying, "Oh, my God, you're going to do it." But hours later, at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, Heather was told what almost every transplant patient is told at some point: The donated organ wasn't suitable.
NEWS
By www.water.com | July 13, 2003
Up to 60 percent of the human body is water. The brain is 75 percent water. Blood is 82 percent water, and the lungs are nearly 90 percent water.
SPORTS
By Michael Hirsley and Michael Hirsley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 28, 2004
CHICAGO - Reggie White probably died of a mysterious inflammatory disease of unknown origin that can strike any organ in the body, exist without detection and disappear without treatment in many cases, according to a preliminary autopsy report. Sarcoidosis in White's lungs and heart was the likely trigger that "resulted in a fatal cardiac arrhythmia," Dr. Mike Sullivan, medical examiner of Mecklenburg County, N.C., said yesterday. "Sleep apnea may have been a contributing factor." Sullivan's is the jurisdiction where White died at 7:51 a.m. Sunday after being taken from his home in Cornelius, N.C., to Presbyterian Hospital in Huntersville, N.C. He was 43. Though sarcoidosis is lethal in only 5 percent of cases and is reported in only one of every 2,500 U.S. residents, its insidious nature apparently has been revealed again in White's case.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 21, 1990
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. -- Aerosolized pentamizine, used to prevent recurrence of a pneumonia that is a major killer of AIDS patients, appears to be inadequate, according to new studies at the University of Southern California.Dr. Narsing Rao, director of Ophthalmologic Pathology at the Doheny Eye Institute in Los Angeles, yesterday urged eye exams by physicians every three months for longtime users of aerosolized pentamizine, which is inhaled into the lungs. Rao said the exams are necessary for early detection of signs in the eye that the pneumonia has spread from the lungs to other organs.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff writer | June 26, 1991
Two short months free from an oxygen tank were enough time to complete what Charles W. "Bud" Groft Jr. wanted to do.Family members say the 51-year-old Manchester resident never regretted the double-lungtransplant he received in August that indirectly took his life Saturday.Groft had developed stomach ulcers from the medication he took tofight organ rejection and died from an infection after ulcer surgeryat Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.However, the avid outdoorsman was able to drive to visit friends, take his grandsons hunting and enjoy time with his horse Echo between the time he regained his strength from the transplant and became ill again in February.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Columbia resident Michael Osborne couldn't process the news when he was first diagnosed with a rare form of lung cancer back in May 2008. "It was horrifying," he said. "I called my wife, and we cried a lot. I was thinking 'You die of this disease, period.' " But after nearly a year of treatment, which included multiple surgeries and the removal of a portion of his right lung, Osborne, 57, has been cancer-free since March 2009. Now he is organizing the second annual Breathe Deep Columbia 5K Walk, to raise awareness of the disease, collect funds for lung cancer research and create a community of survivors and their loved ones.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Amid last year's Opening Day fanfare there was a somber feeling in the press box at Camden Yards -- a reminder we had lost some old friends the previous offseason, including a longtime sportswriter, an Orioles superfan and Hall of Fame manager Earl Weaver. That day stung a little bit. In comparison, I imagine this year's opener will feel like the business end of a swarm of angry wasps. Since the end of the 2013 season, the Orioles family lost, among others, former minority owner Tom Clancy and Gold Glove stalwart Paul Blair.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 9, 2014
Americans are being diagnosed with fewer cases of lung cancer, the most deadly type of the disease, largely because of efforts to curb tobacco use, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  The report comes during on the 50th anniversary of the first U.S. surgeon general's report linking smoking to lung cancer. Though smoking has grown worldwide, the incidence of lung cancer in the United States went down 2.6 percent a year among men and 1.1 percent among women.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Peter Angelos, the personal injury lawyer who owns the Baltimore Orioles, donated $2.5 million to MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center to establish a lung disease treatment center in his name, he and hospital officials announced Wednesday. The gift, the largest single donation in the hospital's 115-year history, will more than pay for renovating a 3,000-square-foot space where doctors from various disciplines related to lung disease will collaborate and see patients. Those diseases include cancers like mesothelioma that are caused by asbestos exposure, the specialty of Angelos' Baltimore law firm.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Johns Hopkins Medicine announced Friday that it is temporarily halting its practice of giving second opinions in possible "black lung" cases, after ABC News reported that Hopkins doctors usually side with the coal mining companies paying for the service. In thousands of cases, X-ray readers at Hopkins have "almost unwaveringly" sided with the companies seeking to defeat the claims of coal miners seeking benefits, according to the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit investigative reporting outlet that teamed with ABC on the report.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
An influential U.S. health care panel's recommendation for lung cancer screening of high-risk patients could fortify Baltimore-area hospitals' efforts to prevent deaths from the disease, which kills more each year than the next four deadliest cancers combined. Patients ages 55-80 who are or have been heavy smokers will likely be able to get insurance coverage for preventive CT scans examining their lungs for abnormalities. Some patients have been paying up to $300 out-of-pocket for the procedures, and several local hospitals have invested in performing them more frequently as research indicated a possible benefit.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHNEIDER and ANDREW SCHNEIDER,SUN REPORTER | November 2, 2005
The asbestos contaminating the vermiculite ore from the W.R. Grace & Co. mine in Libby was tremolite. Its fibers are far more toxic, and it produces 10 to 100 times more scarring, than the more widely used chrysotile asbestos. The fibers are like microscopic needles or spears, which, because of their sharpness, become imbedded in lung tissue. Over time, the fibers become infected and create scar tissue in the lungs and the pleura, which is the lining of the lungs and the chest cavity. The pleura, when healthy, is thinner than a balloon and as flexible.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Charlie Zill, the popular long-time usher at Camden Yards who entertained Orioles fans with his “Zillbilly” dance during the seventh-inning stretch, died late Saturday night of lung cancer. He was 56. Zill, who had been diagnosed with cancer three and a half years ago, attended his final Orioles game April 17 as a guest of the club.  Wearing an Orioles cap and jersey over his trademark “Zillbilly” overalls, he threw out the first pitch from his wheelchair before the Orioles took the field against the Tampa Bay Rays.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
Charlie Zill got his wish - and then some. The long-time usher at Camden Yards, who has stage 4 lung cancer, watched his beloved Orioles play one more time Wednesday night. Wearing an Orioles cap and jersey over his trademark "Zillbilly" overalls, he also threw out the first pitch from his wheelchair to new Orioles pitcher T.J. McFarland. "Sinkerball," Zill said in a weak voice of the pitch that was low and away and drew a nice ovation from the crowd. "Incredible. I didn't think this was going to happen.
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