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NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1996
Peter G. Angelos, the attorney who has made millions suing asbestos companies on behalf of factory workers and is taking on the tobacco industry, yesterday pledged $1 million for lung research in Maryland.The gift is the largest in the history of the American Lung Association of Maryland. It will go toward a $3 million endowment campaign to support research into preventing, curing and treating pulmonary diseases.In presenting a check for $350,000 as the first installment, Angelos said, "Every business, individual and professional has an obligation to give back to the community."
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HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2013
Johns Hopkins Medicine announced Friday that it is temporarily halting its practice of giving second opinions in possible "black lung" cases, after ABC News reported that Hopkins doctors usually side with the coal mining companies paying for the service. In thousands of cases, X-ray readers at Hopkins have "almost unwaveringly" sided with the companies seeking to defeat the claims of coal miners seeking benefits, according to the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit investigative reporting outlet that teamed with ABC on the report.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1996
Predictions that a new prescription weight-loss pill will attract millions of frustrated dieters have some doctors worrying about a potential side effect that is worse than fat -- a deadly lung disease called primary pulmonary hypertension.Lung specialists concede they have not proved that the drug, to be sold as Redux, triggers the disease. Even if the link is proved, the risk may be very small for the individual patient taking the medication.But they said the affliction is so serious that the drug should be prescribed only for the truly obese -- and even then, with extreme caution.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Dr. Wilmot C. Ball Jr., former head of the division of respiratory diseases at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, died Oct. 12 of complications from dementia at the Edenwald retirement community. He was 85. The son of a Bell Laboratories electrical engineer and a homemaker, Wilmot Coles Ball Jr. was born and raised in Paterson, N.J., and graduated in 1945 from Ridgewood High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1949 in electrical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University, he enrolled in the Cornell University School of Medicine, from which he earned a medical degree in 1954.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1997
My 8-year-old daughter has been coughing up blood. Otherwise, she seems fine.How worried should I be about this?Coughing up blood (called hemoptysis by doctors) should always be taken seriously.It is an unusual symptom in childhood. When it does occur, it may be a sign of a lung disease that requires treatment.Before listing some of the most common causes of hemoptysis during childhood, we want to point out that it is not always easy to tell whether the blood is coming from the lungs or the stomach, but both are important.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | September 6, 2007
The world's largest producer of microwave popcorn, ConAgra Foods Inc., said yesterday that it plans to eliminate from its Orville Redenbacher and Act II brands a butter flavoring linked to severe lung disease in popcorn factory workers. That announcement comes a week after Indianapolis-based Weaver Popcorn Co. said it had stopped using the same flavoring: diacetyl. The companies' decisions coincide with the announcement by a doctor at a leading lung research hospital that a man who ate microwave popcorn daily might have developed the lung disease, which was previously thought to be limited to food plant workers.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHNEIDER and ANDREW SCHNEIDER,SUN REPORTER | June 3, 2006
A federal health agency says it is "greatly expanding" an investigation of the potential hazards of diacetyl and other flavoring chemicals that have been linked to nearly 200 cases of lung disease among factory workers who make or use the chemicals. In related moves, some members of Congress are accusing agencies responsible for worker health of not doing their jobs. And public health professionals nationwide are being told how to identify and report the disease. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health has assigned additional teams of physicians, toxicologists and industrial hygienists to work with the industry and with state and local health departments that have identified workers who might have contracted the disease, bronchiolitis obliterans, which can destroy lungs.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
A Baltimore County man won an $814,500 judgment in Baltimore County Circuit Court after claiming he contracted a rare lung disease known as "popcorn lung" from breathing a chemical used to make food taste buttery. A jury awarded Brian Hallock $5.4 million last month from Polarome International Inc., a New Jersey-based chemical manufacturer and distributor. But a judge said Friday she would reduce the amount because Maryland has a cap on non-economic damages, Hallock's attorney confirmed Tuesday.
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,Sun reporter | August 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Millions of Americans are exposed regularly to vapors released when they heat products containing the same synthetic butter flavoring blamed for destroying the lungs of workers in popcorn and flavoring factories. But public health activists say no one in government has stepped up to assess whether consumers are at risk. The Food and Drug Administration has jurisdiction over products people ingest but reports it has no plans to investigate. Critics say the agency's response reflects a pattern of governmental indifference to the possible threat posed by breathing diacetyl, a butter flavoring agent.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Johns Hopkins researchers, in the largest study to date, will map the genetic code for asthma in people of African descent in hopes of better understanding why the disease and other allergy-related ailments disproportionately afflict that population. Until now, the link between genetics and asthma has been studied using mostly men and women of white European descent. The Hopkins researchers announced Thursday that they will leverage data from other genome projects to take the first wide-scale look at how hereditary factors affect African-Americans who have the disease, which causes wheezing and difficulty breathing, and which can lead to death if not treated.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Naylor W. "Bill" Ruppert, a retired machinist who also had owned and managed a trash-removal business, died Tuesday of lung disease at his Stevensville home. He was 86. Naylor Wilbert Ruppert was born in Baltimore and raised in Garrison. He attended Baltimore County public schools. During World War II, he served with the 82nd Airborne Division until being honorably discharged in 1946. In the late 1940s, he worked as a painter for Thompson's Trailers in Pikesville, and later drove a school bus for Baltimore County public schools.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Air quality will be poor in Baltimore on Sunday, according to state officials. Higher than normal air pollution concentrations could threaten sensitive groups like children, the elderly and people with asthma, heart disease or lung disease. People who may fall into these categories should avoid strenous activity or exercise outdoors. Late Saturday, the Maryland Department of the Environment issued Sunday's code orange air quality alert for the Baltimore metro region. More information about the alert can be found on the Department of the Enviornment's website or by calling the Maryland Air Quality Hotline at 410-537-3247.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Johns Hopkins researchers, in the largest study to date, will map the genetic code for asthma in people of African descent in hopes of better understanding why the disease and other allergy-related ailments disproportionately afflict that population. Until now, the link between genetics and asthma has been studied using mostly men and women of white European descent. The Hopkins researchers announced Thursday that they will leverage data from other genome projects to take the first wide-scale look at how hereditary factors affect African-Americans who have the disease, which causes wheezing and difficulty breathing, and which can lead to death if not treated.
NEWS
September 12, 2011
I couldn't agree more with Rena Steinzor's commentary on air pollution ("Breathing uneasily," Sept. 8). President Obama's decision to reject his own Environmental Protection Agency's recommendation to strengthen air quality standards for ozone is a bad decision for anyone with lung and/orheart disease. Major ground-level ozone sources are motor vehicles, fossil fuel-driven power plants and other industrial sites. If President Obama is not responding to the public health needs of the millions of heart and lung disease sufferers who are affected by ozone pollution, it must be because he is only listening to the cries of the corporate CEOs of the above industries.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
A Baltimore County man won an $814,500 judgment in Baltimore County Circuit Court after claiming he contracted a rare lung disease known as "popcorn lung" from breathing a chemical used to make food taste buttery. A jury awarded Brian Hallock $5.4 million last month from Polarome International Inc., a New Jersey-based chemical manufacturer and distributor. But a judge said Friday she would reduce the amount because Maryland has a cap on non-economic damages, Hallock's attorney confirmed Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | October 18, 2007
When the fall air turns brisk, you know that flu season is just around the corner. And when flu is rampant, doctors typically also see an increase in the number of patients with pneumonia, says Dr. Louis Domenici, chief of the division of general internal medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Neither illness is anything to sneeze at. Together they are listed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the sixth leading cause of death among adults in the United States (behind heart disease, cancer, stroke, accidental death and lung disease)
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
In 1991, Martine Rothblatt got some jarring news from doctors: Her 8-year-old daughter, Jenesis, suffered from primary pulmonary hypertension, a rare lung disease that is difficult to treat and can be fatal.A bibliophile, Rothblatt plowed into everything she could read on the subject. "I was really scared by what I read," she recalled.Only about 5,000 cases of the disorder a year are diagnosed in the United States and Europe. In these patients, the blood pressure in the pulmonary artery connecting the heart to the lungs becomes abnormally high.
NEWS
October 24, 1990
Baltimore Oriole shortstop Cal Ripken Jr. and his wife, Kelly have been named honary chairmen for the American Lung Association of Maryland's 1990 Christmas Seal Campaign.The Ripkens will be featured in a television public service announcement and will be honored at the Christmas Seal Ball Nov. 30.Association officials said 90 percent of the funds raised by the campaign remain in Maryland to support the association's fight for clean air and against lung disease and their other services and programs.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | September 6, 2007
The world's largest producer of microwave popcorn, ConAgra Foods Inc., said yesterday that it plans to eliminate from its Orville Redenbacher and Act II brands a butter flavoring linked to severe lung disease in popcorn factory workers. That announcement comes a week after Indianapolis-based Weaver Popcorn Co. said it had stopped using the same flavoring: diacetyl. The companies' decisions coincide with the announcement by a doctor at a leading lung research hospital that a man who ate microwave popcorn daily might have developed the lung disease, which was previously thought to be limited to food plant workers.
NEWS
By Andrew Schneider and Andrew Schneider,Sun reporter | August 30, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Millions of Americans are exposed regularly to vapors released when they heat products containing the same synthetic butter flavoring blamed for destroying the lungs of workers in popcorn and flavoring factories. But public health activists say no one in government has stepped up to assess whether consumers are at risk. The Food and Drug Administration has jurisdiction over products people ingest but reports it has no plans to investigate. Critics say the agency's response reflects a pattern of governmental indifference to the possible threat posed by breathing diacetyl, a butter flavoring agent.
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