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NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | April 14, 2004
An epidemic of lung cancer among American women has been quietly growing for decades, and an end to the upsurge appears nowhere in sight, doctors will report today. For women, deaths due to lung cancer now outstrip those caused by breast cancer and all gynecologic cancers combined, the researchers will report today. The team of medical scientists who assessed the scope of lung cancer in women say mortality has continued to climb in women even as smoking and deaths from the disease have declined in men. Deaths caused by smoking rose 600 percent in U.S. women from 1930 to 1997, and continues to rise, the team of scientists said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Orioles have already given Baltimore much to be proud of this week by clinching the American League East division title. Not as well known is another reason for Baltimore to be proud of this amazing organization - for the role that they are playing in the fight against lung cancer ( "Reflecting on memorable scenes from the Orioles' celebration Tuesday," Sept. 17). When Orioles Public Relations Director Monica Barlow died this February of lung cancer, she was only 36 years old. She had spent much of her four-and-a-half-year fight against lung cancer sharing her story in the hope of bringing attention to the critical need for research, some of which helped extend her own life.
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EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | November 27, 2012
Editor: November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month. This year, approximately 160,340 Americans are expected to die from lung cancer, accounting for 28 percent of all cancer deaths. That is why there is an entire month dedicated to this disease, raising awareness and increasing research to help put an end to it. People like to think that lung cancer is a self-inflicted disease from smoking. The truth is that radon, second-hand smoke and air pollution all can cause lung cancer.
NEWS
May 31, 2014
The U. S. Preventive Services Task Force, made up of 16 medical experts appointed by the federal government's Department of Health and Human Services, has recently recommended that former and current smokers, ages 55 to 80, receive annual CT scans to test for lung cancer. If the recommendation is put into effect, insurers, as a result of Obamacare, would be required to cover the procedure for around 10 million Americans who would qualify. To be sure, the requirement, as compared with chest rays and illustrated by a study by the National Cancer Institute, could result in a 20 percent decrease in deaths from smoking.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
The da Vinci robotic technology allows doctors to perform more precise surgeries. The technique also enables patients to recover more quickly with fewer complications in many cases. The technique is used to perform many different types of surgeries. Dr. Gavin Henry, program director of the surgical residency at Saint Agnes Hospital in Baltimore, uses it over traditional lobectomy surgery to treat patients with lung cancer. The hospital said Henry is poised to outpace every surgeon in Maryland in the use of robotic technology for this operation.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 9, 2014
Americans are being diagnosed with fewer cases of lung cancer, the most deadly type of the disease, largely because of efforts to curb tobacco use, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  The report comes during on the 50th anniversary of the first U.S. surgeon general's report linking smoking to lung cancer. Though smoking has grown worldwide, the incidence of lung cancer in the United States went down 2.6 percent a year among men and 1.1 percent among women.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Orioles have already given Baltimore much to be proud of this week by clinching the American League East division title. Not as well known is another reason for Baltimore to be proud of this amazing organization - for the role that they are playing in the fight against lung cancer ( "Reflecting on memorable scenes from the Orioles' celebration Tuesday," Sept. 17). When Orioles Public Relations Director Monica Barlow died this February of lung cancer, she was only 36 years old. She had spent much of her four-and-a-half-year fight against lung cancer sharing her story in the hope of bringing attention to the critical need for research, some of which helped extend her own life.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2010
At first glance, the scene looked like the start of an ordinary, if rather large, yoga class. Dozens of women and a few men sat on yoga mats, preparing to inhale and exhale and greet the sun. But messages affixed to the backs of many participants made clear this was a special event. "I am doing yoga in memory of Deborah Goodman, my mom," read Marjorie Goodman's message. "My mom died of lung cancer 16 years ago," she explained. "It's an insidious disease. I'm here to support this cause.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2010
CT scans can reduce deaths by 20 percent in older, heavy smokers by detecting tumors earlier, according to results released Thursday from an eight-year-long national study. The study, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and launched in 2002, aimed to see if the tests, which are more sensitive than X-rays, would affect the outcomes for those with lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the country. The disease was estimated to have killed 159,390 people in 2009, according to the institute — more people than killed by breast, prostate, colon and pancreatic cancer combined.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2013
An influential U.S. health care panel's recommendation for lung cancer screening of high-risk patients could fortify Baltimore-area hospitals' efforts to prevent deaths from the disease, which kills more each year than the next four deadliest cancers combined. Patients ages 55-80 who are or have been heavy smokers will likely be able to get insurance coverage for preventive CT scans examining their lungs for abnormalities. Some patients have been paying up to $300 out-of-pocket for the procedures, and several local hospitals have invested in performing them more frequently as research indicated a possible benefit.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Columbia resident Michael Osborne couldn't process the news when he was first diagnosed with a rare form of lung cancer back in May 2008. "It was horrifying," he said. "I called my wife, and we cried a lot. I was thinking 'You die of this disease, period.' " But after nearly a year of treatment, which included multiple surgeries and the removal of a portion of his right lung, Osborne, 57, has been cancer-free since March 2009. Now he is organizing the second annual Breathe Deep Columbia 5K Walk, to raise awareness of the disease, collect funds for lung cancer research and create a community of survivors and their loved ones.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Amid last year's Opening Day fanfare there was a somber feeling in the press box at Camden Yards -- a reminder we had lost some old friends the previous offseason, including a longtime sportswriter, an Orioles superfan and Hall of Fame manager Earl Weaver. That day stung a little bit. In comparison, I imagine this year's opener will feel like the business end of a swarm of angry wasps. Since the end of the 2013 season, the Orioles family lost, among others, former minority owner Tom Clancy and Gold Glove stalwart Paul Blair.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
Lots of varied things coming out of manager Buck Showalter's evening session with the media: Roughly 30 players and staff will leave Friday's 1:05 p.m. game at about 3 p.m. - after about four or five innings -- to board a charter plane for Virginia to attend a memorial for late public relations director Monica Barlow, who passed away on Feb. 28 after a protracted battle with lung cancer. Showalter said the club originally was going to use a smaller plane, but he didn't want to turn anyone away, so owner Peter Angelos has chartered a larger one. The group will fly back by approximately 10:30 p.m. Friday, Showalter said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Hans C. Kliemisch, a 10th-degree black belt who established three karate studios, died Feb. 25 of lung cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Essex resident was 84. Mr. Kliemisch was born and raised in the Bronx, N.Y., where he attended public schools. "He lied about his age and served in the Army during World War II," said his daughter, Kimberly Moss of Virginia Beach, Va. "He later served in the Navy during the Korean War. " In 1954, Mr. Kliemisch moved to Baltimore and went to work at Sparrows Point in Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s tin mill, from which he retired in 1999.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. - Even though Monica Barlow was the Orioles public relations director - and as part of her job she was the link between Baltimore's baseball team and its fans and media - she never liked the spotlight. I can just imagine what she would think about the fitting tributes she's received since her death Friday morning at the age of 36. “Really?” I could imagine her saying in a high-pitched voice. Monica's battle with Stage IV lung cancer ended Friday after more than four years.
NEWS
February 9, 2014
As a lung cancer survivor who began smoking as a teenager because it was cool, I know the dangers of smoking first hand. I volunteer for the American Cancer Society as a recovery coach for lung and esophageal cancer patients. In addition, I work as a cancer registrar at MedStar Franklin Square Hospital and record tumor statistics for the many lung cancer diagnoses. I was diagnosed at age 49 with lung cancer and had both the fright and fight of my life. Luckily, I'm still here and can enjoy my beautiful little grandson, although, because I also have COPD as a result of my smoking, I have trouble keeping up with him. We've made a lot of progress against tobacco, but there is still work to do in Maryland.
HEALTH
By Elaina Clarke and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
Monica Barlow hates being asked whether she is a former smoker. To her it doesn't matter. To the people she meets who hear she is battling Stage 4 lung cancer, it seems the only possible explanation. "The answer is no, but that kind of frustrates me, because that's not to say that if I did smoke I deserved cancer," said Barlow, 35, director of public relations for the Orioles. The stigma behind her disease is one reason she is participating in the Breathe Deep Baltimore 5K Walk/Fun Run around the warning track at Oriole Park at Camden Yards on Sept.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Charlie Zill, the popular long-time usher at Camden Yards who entertained Orioles fans with his “Zillbilly” dance during the seventh-inning stretch, died late Saturday night of lung cancer. He was 56. Zill, who had been diagnosed with cancer three and a half years ago, attended his final Orioles game April 17 as a guest of the club.  Wearing an Orioles cap and jersey over his trademark “Zillbilly” overalls, he threw out the first pitch from his wheelchair before the Orioles took the field against the Tampa Bay Rays.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
It's been half a century since the first U.S. surgeon general's report appeared linking smoking to lung cancer. In the decades that followed, federal and state health officials waged a vigorous public information and education campaign that convinced millions of Americans to kick the habit. But as a new surgeon general's report this month warned, smoking remains the leading cause of preventable deaths in the U.S., and its health consequences for individuals are even more lethal than previously believed.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 23, 2014
It was gratifying to us to have seen the timely feature story that appeared on Jan. 15, following our recent news release about newest DHMH Cancer Report data that reflect increased rates of cancer of the lung and bronchus in the County. However, I was delighted to see your editorial, "Still Smoking?" appear as a follow-up in the Friday, Jan. 17, edition of The Aegis . Your simple, but cleverly worded, message reiterates an obvious, but very critical public health message as to the deadly relationship between tobacco smoking and increased risk of lung cancer.
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