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NEWS
January 15, 2007
Craig Herbert Lundberg, a retired Anne Arundel County high school principal, died of emphysema Wednesday at his Odenton home. He was 71. Born in Duluth, Minn., he moved to Maryland in late 1940s. He received his bachelor's degree and a master's degree in education from the University of Maryland, College Park. He began teaching choral music at Arundel High School in 1957 and later went into administrative work at Brooklyn Park High School. In 1984 he retired from the county public school system after serving as vice principal and principal at Glen Burnie High School and principal of Northeast High School in Pasadena.
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FEATURES
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun Reporter | May 17, 2008
Virginia Lee Burton had a way of making the complex seem simple. The author and illustrator who created such children's classics as Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel and The Little House explored themes of friendship, urbanization and democracy in ways children could understand. "She was far ahead of her time," said Rawn Fulton, an award-winning filmmaker whose documentary Virginia Lee Burton -- A Sense of Place tells the story of one of the most important children's book authors of the 20th century.
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NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | June 20, 2000
Research by two University of Washington economists strongly suggests that men not only work longer hours after the birth of a child, they work harder still if that child is a son. The researchers are stumped to explain why and have witnessed some serious head-scratching from fellow economists. "Their response has been, `I love my daughter as much as I love my son,'" said Shelly Lundberg, a UW economics professor who conducted the research with fellow UW economist Elaina Rose. Lundberg and Rose's findings do not suggest that hard-working fathers love a son more than a daughter, said Lundberg, the study's principal investigator.
NEWS
January 15, 2007
Craig Herbert Lundberg, a retired Anne Arundel County high school principal, died of emphysema Wednesday at his Odenton home. He was 71. Born in Duluth, Minn., he moved to Maryland in late 1940s. He received his bachelor's degree and a master's degree in education from the University of Maryland, College Park. He began teaching choral music at Arundel High School in 1957 and later went into administrative work at Brooklyn Park High School. In 1984 he retired from the county public school system after serving as vice principal and principal at Glen Burnie High School and principal of Northeast High School in Pasadena.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, a vice dean at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, said yesterday that she agreed to edit the American Medical Association's prestigious journal only after receiving assurances that the AMA would not meddle in editorial decisions."
NEWS
August 10, 1995
John Patrick DevlinMass scheduledA Mass of Christian burial for John Patrick Devlin, a contractor and longtime East Baltimore political activist, was to be offered at 10 a.m. today at Holy Rosary Roman Catholic Church, 400 S. Chester St.Mr. Devlin, who was 58, was struck fatally by a pickup truck Sunday afternoon as he crossed the street in the 2000 block of Eastern Ave., near his home.A Baltimore native, Mr. Devlin enlisted in the Air Force after graduating in 1955 from Patterson High School.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun Reporter | May 17, 2008
Virginia Lee Burton had a way of making the complex seem simple. The author and illustrator who created such children's classics as Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel and The Little House explored themes of friendship, urbanization and democracy in ways children could understand. "She was far ahead of her time," said Rawn Fulton, an award-winning filmmaker whose documentary Virginia Lee Burton -- A Sense of Place tells the story of one of the most important children's book authors of the 20th century.
NEWS
By Faye Flam and Faye Flam,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 20, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - Science has only just discovered the Chiapas catfish, but the people of remote southern Mexico have known it for years - as dinner. Scientists at Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences recently declared the Mexican catfish not only a new species but the lone representative of an entirely new family of fish - one of only half a dozen new fish families identified over the last century. `Striking discovery' "It's a very striking discovery," said Richard Vari, a zoologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | October 13, 1992
CHICAGO -- The "act of God," as Francis Harty calls it, struck when he and his wife, Lorree, were snuggled in their living room watching a small black-and-white television during a raging spring storm."
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
Recently, child psychiatrists at the University of Chicago completed a study on a fad treatment for autism. They found that the drug secretin did nothing to help autistic children speak or interact with others, contradicting claims that had been made on a network television show.Dr. Edwin Cook, a well-known psychiatrist involved in the study, knew the results weren't going to make anyone happy. But he thought it was important to get the news out fast, if only to calm the hopes of desperate parents.
NEWS
By Faye Flam and Faye Flam,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 20, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - Science has only just discovered the Chiapas catfish, but the people of remote southern Mexico have known it for years - as dinner. Scientists at Philadelphia's Academy of Natural Sciences recently declared the Mexican catfish not only a new species but the lone representative of an entirely new family of fish - one of only half a dozen new fish families identified over the last century. `Striking discovery' "It's a very striking discovery," said Richard Vari, a zoologist at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | June 20, 2000
Research by two University of Washington economists strongly suggests that men not only work longer hours after the birth of a child, they work harder still if that child is a son. The researchers are stumped to explain why and have witnessed some serious head-scratching from fellow economists. "Their response has been, `I love my daughter as much as I love my son,'" said Shelly Lundberg, a UW economics professor who conducted the research with fellow UW economist Elaina Rose. Lundberg and Rose's findings do not suggest that hard-working fathers love a son more than a daughter, said Lundberg, the study's principal investigator.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2000
When Steven Lundberg was 19, he began serving a 2 1/2-year mission in Germany -- going door-to-door spreading the teachings of his Mormon religion, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Now a colonel stationed at the Army Research Laboratory in Adelphi, Lundberg, 55, serves as bishop to one of the congregations that meet at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints building in Ellicott City. The church is home to three congregations, or wards, in the area. Two wards come from Columbia and the other is from the Catonsville/Ellicott City area.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1999
Recently, child psychiatrists at the University of Chicago completed a study on a fad treatment for autism. They found that the drug secretin did nothing to help autistic children speak or interact with others, contradicting claims that had been made on a network television show.Dr. Edwin Cook, a well-known psychiatrist involved in the study, knew the results weren't going to make anyone happy. But he thought it was important to get the news out fast, if only to calm the hopes of desperate parents.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, a vice dean at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, said yesterday that she agreed to edit the American Medical Association's prestigious journal only after receiving assurances that the AMA would not meddle in editorial decisions."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 21, 1999
BOSTON -- Well, well. Here it is, the first anniversary of life with Monica and someone finally got fired on account of sex.No, not House Judiciary Chairman Henry Hyde, the corpulent adulterer lecturing us about broken oaths. Not Rep. Bob Barr, the Georgia Republican and twice-divorced champion of the Defense of Marriage Act. Not even President Clinton. Not yet.The man handed his walking papers was George Lundberg, a doctor and editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Lundberg was canned after 17 years for printing a survey in this week's JAMA showing that 60 percent of college students think oral sex isn't sex.The AMA summarily ditched the editor who brought JAMA from the medical backwaters to the too-cutting edge for "inappropriately and inexcusably interjecting JAMA into a major political debate that has nothing to do with science or medicine."
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | November 25, 1990
The repercussions from Saddam Hussein's military excursion took little time to radiate from the Kuwaiti desert to the pocketbooks of Maryland motorists and business people.Unleaded regular gasoline that sold at self-service pumps for an average of $1.08 a gallon on Aug. 2, the day Iraq invaded Kuwait, was selling for $1.13.2 just four days later, according to the Automobile Club of Maryland. By Nov. 9, it cost an average of $1.40 to buy a gallon of regular unleaded.But statistics provided by a petroleum consumption publication, the Lundberg Letter, indicate that nationwide, prices for gasoline have begun to fall, dropping an average of a penny on Nov. 16. With crude oil prices on the wane for now, could Maryland gasoline prices possibly return to pre-invasion levels?
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 21, 1999
BOSTON -- Well, well. Here it is, the first anniversary of life with Monica and someone finally got fired on account of sex.No, not House Judiciary Chairman Henry Hyde, the corpulent adulterer lecturing us about broken oaths. Not Rep. Bob Barr, the Georgia Republican and twice-divorced champion of the Defense of Marriage Act. Not even President Clinton. Not yet.The man handed his walking papers was George Lundberg, a doctor and editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Lundberg was canned after 17 years for printing a survey in this week's JAMA showing that 60 percent of college students think oral sex isn't sex.The AMA summarily ditched the editor who brought JAMA from the medical backwaters to the too-cutting edge for "inappropriately and inexcusably interjecting JAMA into a major political debate that has nothing to do with science or medicine."
NEWS
August 10, 1995
John Patrick DevlinMass scheduledA Mass of Christian burial for John Patrick Devlin, a contractor and longtime East Baltimore political activist, was to be offered at 10 a.m. today at Holy Rosary Roman Catholic Church, 400 S. Chester St.Mr. Devlin, who was 58, was struck fatally by a pickup truck Sunday afternoon as he crossed the street in the 2000 block of Eastern Ave., near his home.A Baltimore native, Mr. Devlin enlisted in the Air Force after graduating in 1955 from Patterson High School.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | August 14, 1994
The two-day nostalgic race meet at the half-mile Marlboro Racetrack in Upper Marlboro has been canceled this fall, perhaps for good.Management of the Prince George's Equestrian Center, which operates the track in conjunction with its multimillion-dollar indoor arena and fairgrounds, recently notified its racing officials and citizens board by letter of the cancellation.The meet, held on consecutive Wednesdays in October since 1988, was popular with the Southern Maryland horse community, which is bemoaning the loss.
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